Arlene Foster on verge of facing DUP leadership challenge

first_img An estimated 75 per cent of Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) Members of the Legislative Assembly (MLAs) have reportedly signed a letter calling for Arlene Foster to face a leadership contest. (Getty Images) Also Read: Arlene Foster on verge of facing DUP leadership challenge An estimated 75 per cent of Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) Members of the Legislative Assembly (MLAs) have reportedly signed a letter calling for Arlene Foster to face a leadership contest. (Getty Images) “So we’ll just deal with it and move on because I’ve bigger things to do, including getting us through this Covid pandemic, including listening to the concerns of working class communities,” she said. whatsapp The future of the protocol may rest with Foster’s successor as leader of the DUP. Arlene Foster on verge of facing DUP leadership challenge Experts said long simmering sectarian tensions, combined with social deprivation in some communities, were at the root of the riots and that the Brexit Withdrawal Agreement’s Northern Ireland Protocol effectively lit a match on the situation. Share The protocol sees Northern Ireland follow the EU’s customs union and single market rules, unlike the rest of the UK, placing a so-called border in the Irish sea. Tuesday 27 April 2021 4:36 pm This separation from the rest of the UK has infuriated some parts of the unionist community. It comes just weeks after Belfast was hit by days of rioting and violence started by a small section of Northern Ireland’s unionist community.center_img An estimated 75 per cent of Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) Members of the Legislative Assembly (MLAs) have reportedly signed a letter calling for Foster to face a leadership contest. It has been reported by Northern Ireland daily newspaper The News Letter that half of the party’s Westminster MPs have also signed the letter. More From Our Partners Native American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgKamala Harris keeps list of reporters who don’t ‘understand’ her: reportnypost.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgMark Eaton, former NBA All-Star, dead at 64nypost.comRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgPuffer fish snaps a selfie with lucky divernypost.com Foster today played down reports that she could be ousted as Northern Ireland’s First Minister. Show Comments ▼ Arlene Foster is on the verge of being removed as the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) leader and Northern Ireland’s First Minister in a move that could jeopardise the Good Friday Agreement and the Brexit treaty’s Northern Ireland Protocol. whatsapp Stefan Boscia An estimated 75 per cent of Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) Members of the Legislative Assembly (MLAs) have reportedly signed a letter calling for Arlene Foster to face a leadership contest. (Getty Images) Also Read: Arlene Foster on verge of facing DUP leadership challenge last_img read more

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It Was 50 Years Ago Today

first_imgUncategorizedIt Was 50 Years Ago TodayHalf a century ago, the Beatles arrived in America. A new book talks to the fans, who have loved them the longestBy Julia St. Pierre – February 7, 2014634ShareEmailFacebookTwitterPinterestReddItI was born in 1963, and for as long as I can remember I have been a huge Beatles fan. I was playing my older siblings’ 45s on a Show N Tell record player instead of the Winnie the Pooh EPs that came with it. While I’ve seen and read countless rock n roll documentaries and biographies where musicians explain how seeing the four lads from Liverpool on The Ed Sullivan Show that night in 1964 set them on their career path, for me there was never a “Where were you?” moment. The Beatles were always a part of my life. It’s been a revelation to read The Beatles Are Here!, a series of essays edited by Penelope Rowlands (Algonquin Books) in which fans, DJs, photographers, writers, and musicians recount how life changing that moment truly was.  Rowlands was one of those hysterical teenagers who tried to catch a glimpse of the Fab Four outside their hotel in New York, her face clearly visible in the photo on the book’s cover (It ran in the New York Times in September of 1964). Gathering stories from Fran Lebowitz, Billy Joel, Renee Fleming, Cyndi Lauper, Joe Queenan, Peter Duchin and many others, she delves into so many aspects of the era that I had never considered, reminding me how different life was in the ’60s.John F. Kennedy’s assassination had occured just three months prior and the country desperately needed something to smile about. The civil rights movement divided the nation with mainstream radio stations refusing to play “black” music. Instead, they stuck to “safe music”: Steve Lawrence and Eydie Gorme, Frankie Avalon, Fabian, Lawrence Welk on television, and Elvis Presley in silly movies. So when American ears heard these songs for the first time, they were ready for something happy and fun. And teenagers were ready for something different—something their parents didn’t listen to.The lyrics of the first songs you heard were simple and sweet and spoke straight to teenagers: “I want to hold your hand,” “She loves you, yeah yeah yeah.” The music was fresh and different with a danceable beat, unique chords and strong harmonies.  TV was in its infancy. You got most of your media—news, entertainment and music—from the radio, so there was a good chance you didn’t know how John, Paul, Ringo, and George looked. Part of the hysteria surrounding the Beatles, which hadn’t occurred to me, was based on teens starving for the chance to see them.Through these entertaining anecdotes, even stories that detail how the girls in the photo on the cover of the book all find each other again, The Beatles Are Here! explores how the Fab Four affected people from vastly different walks of life. There was the photographer who shot pictures of them at that first press conference in New York and realized how intelligent they were, the DJ who watched armed guards arrive with their new records, the Catholic school girl who was crestfallen to find out Paul was Church of England and would have to convert to marry her, Cyndi Lauper’s mother screaming at her daughter while pointing to the pictures of the Beatles on the walls, “I want you and all your friends to clean this room up right now.” Ever the contrarian, Fran Lebowitz says it had no affect on her at all.These personal stories explain how Beatlemania changed everything. Not just music, but hair, clothes, attitudes, media, stardom, and even how people talked. For the subjects of this book, as for many, February 1964 was when their lives truly began. TAGSL.A. CultureMusicThe BeatlesThe Beatles Are Here!Previous articleL.A. by the Slice: How to Process Warm-Weather GuiltNext article#SaveRufus: The Legendary 38-Year-Old Pacu Fish From Bahooka Needs a New HomeJulia St. Pierre RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORA Hip-Hop and R&B Fest Coming to L.A. in December Has a Ridiculously Stacked LineupSong Catalogs Are Selling for Big Bucks, but Will the Trend End on a Bum Note?Coachella Sets a Date for Its 2022 Comebacklast_img read more

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Amec to complete £2bn Foster Wheeler deal by next Tuesday

first_img whatsapp Share by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeSerendipity TimesThe Truth About Why ’40s Actor John Wayne Didn’t Serve In WWII Has Come To LightSerendipity TimesIkaria Beauty2 Effective At Home Face “Lift” Methods (10 Seconds)Ikaria BeautyYeah MotorCheck Out These Car Wraps, 20 Car Wraps That Had Us LaughingYeah MotorTaonga: The Island FarmThe Most Relaxing Farm Game of 2021. No InstallTaonga: The Island FarmPost Fun25 Worst Movies Ever, According To Rotten TomatoesPost FunBetterBe20 Stunning Female AthletesBetterBeDefinitionHistorians Doubt These 21 Famous People Ever ExistedDefinitionNoteableyKirstie Alley Is So Skinny Now And Looks Like A BarbieNoteableytigerscroll.comHere’s What The Black Diamond On Measuring Tape Really Meanstigerscroll.com Amec to complete £2bn Foster Wheeler deal by next Tuesday Wednesday 5 November 2014 8:34 pm Joseph Millis center_img More From Our Partners Brave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgSupermodel Anne Vyalitsyna claims income drop, pushes for child supportnypost.comRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgBiden received funds from top Russia lobbyist before Nord Stream 2 giveawaynypost.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.com980-foot skyscraper sways in China, prompting panic and evacuationsnypost.comKiller drone ‘hunted down a human target’ without being told tonypost.comMatt Gaetz swindled by ‘malicious actors’ in $155K boat sale boondogglenypost.comI blew off Adam Sandler 22 years ago — and it’s my biggest regretnypost.comMark Eaton, former NBA All-Star, dead at 64nypost.comInside Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis’ not-so-average farmhouse estatenypost.comUK teen died on school trip after teachers allegedly refused her pleasnypost.com‘Neighbor from hell’ faces new charges after scaring off home buyersnypost.comKamala Harris keeps list of reporters who don’t ‘understand’ her: reportnypost.com whatsapp Show Comments ▼ Tags: Amec Foster Wheeler Company Engineering and project management company Amec yesterday said it has extended the acceptance period for its £2bn take­over of Foster Wheeler until the end of New York trading on 12 November.Amec has also filed a post-effective amendment to the registration statement with the US Securities and Exchange Commission.The company said the offer for the US-based engineering and construction contractor had been extended to provide Foster Wheeler shareholders with an opportunity to review the post-effective amendment, which includes Foster Wheeler’s third quarter results, released on Monday.In a statement, Amec said it had acceptances for 94.291 per cent of Foster Wheeler shares on Tuesday.“I am delighted that the acquisition process is now nearing the end and completion is expected very soon. With integration planning well underway, we believe the creation of Amec Foster Wheeler is a compelling proposition for our shareholders, our customers and our employees,” Amec chief executive Samir Brikho said. last_img read more

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News / Former SwissWorldCargo chief Oliver Evans takes up role at drone logistics company Matternet

first_img Oliver Evans, former chief cargo officer of SwissWorldCargo and chair of TIACA, has made a decision on his future – he has become the head of global business development for Matternet.Mr Evans has made no secret of his desires to explore new technologies which could change logistics – and Matternet fits the bill perfectly.The company, which provides drone delivery services for groups such as the World Health Organisation and Doctors Without Borders, is now marketing a product for logistics by drone to pharmaceutical and logistics companies, as well as humanitarian groups. As such, Mr Evans’ experience in the Swiss healthcare industry will fit well.His aim for Matternet will be to make the market aware of the product, build customer relations and work with regulators. The regulatory environment for drones is still immature, and remains one of the biggest barriers to successful drone logistics. By Alex Lennane 12/11/2015 Matternet was recently given the plaudit Technology Pioneer 2015 by the World Economic Forum, for its significant impact on business and society. The title has previously been awarded to Google and Wikipedia, among others.Mr Evans, happily, is to remain in his beloved Switzerland – something he has said he would not give up for any job.last_img read more

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LongRead / Maersk Line introduces remote container management “game-changer”

first_imgBy Gavin van Marle 26/04/2016 Maersk Line has formally unveiled its remote container management (RCM) system for advanced monitoring of the line’s fleet of reefer containers, wherever they are in the world.The project is detailed in The inside story on how to keep it cool, a new LongRead published by The Loadstar today.The RCM project, which was five years in the making, saw the line’s entire fleet of 270,000 reefers equipped with a remote container device that utilises a 3G sim card and GPS unit, as well an antenna.In addition, around 400 vessels – every one of its 270-owned and 130 long-term chartered containerships – have been equipped with a VSAT dome on the roof of the bridge, which receives data sent by a reefer’s antennae. This data is then transmitted to orbiting satellites and retransmitted to Maersk HQ in Copenhagen and back to the vessel.Once the container is on land, it links with the local mobile phone network and transits data across that.The RCM system means huge amounts of data on the condition of a reefer is now available to Maersk Line, giving it huge potential advances in equipment positioning, maintenance and repair, and leading to substantial cost savings in areas such as inspections.For example, Maersk Line’s project head, Catja Rasmussen, told The Loadstar that the time required for pre-trip inspections (PTIs) had been reduced “from up to six hours to 12 minutes”, because so much data was available before the inspector even looked at the box.Maersk’s head of reefer management, Shereen Zarkani, told The Loadstar: “The starting point for this project was to obtain visibility at a very granular level – knowing where each container is; including when it is en route to the port, on the sea, in the terminal, or at the terminal gates – and being able to aggregate all the bits and pieces of data.“The data has always been there, but it has been difficult to bring it together. Now that we can do that; it is a game-changer,” she added.Although the line has yet to formally unveil it as a commercial service to shippers of perishable cargo, the potential for hugely increased levels of cargo care is obvious.Chayenne Wiskerke, is the managing director of Wiskerke Onions, the largest onion exporter in the Netherlands, with an annual volume of around 5,000 40ft boxes a year – much of which is transported to Africa, Asia and Latin America and which sees the boxes being transported through a wide variety of different climates.“If you can keep the onions at the most optimal setting, then you have higher quality at the end destination, but you need to have the right data to make the best decisions, and that comes through monitoring the live flows,” she said.The full report can be downloaded free for Loadstar readers herelast_img read more

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News / Idle containership fleet falls below 100 as demand for tonnage remains tight

first_img© Eq Roy By Mike Wackett 18/01/2018 The number of containerships in lay-up has dipped below 100, according to Alphaliner.Its latest survey reveals strong demand and tightening availability of tonnage which is putting the brakes on vessel scrapping.As at 8 January, there were 99 vessels, equating to 377,784 teu, anchored in hot or cold lay-up. This compares with 351 ships for 950,000 teu a year ago.At 1.8% of the global cellular fleet, idled container tonnage is at its lowest level since mid-2015.“The availability of tonnage is tightening for all sectors below 6,000 teu, and this has been reflected in strengthening charter rates,” said the consultant.In particular it noted that there had been a “remarkable change in fortunes” for the panamax sector, with only 13 3,000-5,100 teu ships still seeking employment, against the 99 unemployed units of 12 months ago.Indeed, one broker source told The Loadstar today that finding a spot panamax vessel in Europe was “becoming increasingly difficult”.He said: “Most of the available ships are at anchor in Asia, and even some of those would need at least a couple of weeks to be reactivated.”He added that on the plus side, charterers were extending available options which, he suggested, would mean daily hire rates increasing.Reports are also coming in of charterers talking again of 12-month or even 24-month hires, a sign that cargo owners believe they need to lock into today’s rates rather than stick to their previous strategy of fixing for three-month-plus options.In the past month, the market rate for panamax ships has jumped by $1,000 to some $9,000 per day, and the broker said he expected a further surge in the weeks before the Chinese New Year holiday in mid-February.Demand is also strong in the 5,000-7,500 teu sizes, but brokers are reporting “mixed fortunes” for owners of 7,500 teu vessels and above.Alphaliner noted “healthier” charter rates for certain higher-specification vessels, but suggested the environment remained “fragile” for the sector, due to the large number of newbuild ultra-large container vessels (ULCV) slated for delivery in the first six months of the year.Their arrival will cause significant cascading, particularly of the 8,000-10,000 teu sizes, warned the consultant.And with the supply/demand balance for tonnage tilting back in their favour, owners of older containerships are adopting a ‘wait and see’ approach to recycling, despite improving scrap rates. London shipbroker Braemar ACM reported this week that so far this year there has not been a single container vessel sold for demolition, compared with 20 of 60,500 teu sold for scrap in the same period of 2017.Meanwhile, in the first two weeks of this year, 13 newbuild vessels, with a nominal intake of 118,500 teu, have been delivered, most being phased into the Asia-Europe tradelane.last_img read more

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Cambridge researchers wade into gene-editing debate

first_img Tags CRISPRembryonic stem cellsgene editing By Andrew Joseph Dec. 2, 2015 Reprints @DrewQJoseph About the Author Reprints Related: General Assignment Reporter Andrew covers a range of topics, from addiction to public health to genetics. [email protected] BusinessCambridge researchers wade into gene-editing debate center_img Kendall Squared brings you dispatches from the world’s epicenter for biotechnology and drug discovery.Hundreds of scientists are gathered in Washington D.C. this week to wrestle with the issues of if and how human genomes should be edited — a conversation that has far-reaching implications for researchers in Kendall Square.The International Summit on Human Gene Editing is giving particular attention to the topic of editing genes in reproductive cells and embryos. That approach could prevent certain inherited diseases, but it remains controversial because the changes would be transmitted to future generations.A panel on Wednesday highlighted another important role for such research: understanding more about the basics of human genetics and embryonic development.advertisement Andrew Joseph Feng Zhang of the Broad Institute participates in a panel discussion this week at the National Academy of Sciences international summit on the safety and ethics of human gene editing. Susan Walsh/AP Gene-editing superstars to tackle tough ethical questions at global summit Rudolf Jaenisch, a founding member of the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research and an MIT biologist, is one scientist invested in this kind of research. Jaenisch, who has studied embryonic stem cells, said at the summit he thought editing embryos’ DNA as a way of curing diseases would have limited effects for most genetic disorders at this point. But he argued that researchers could make great strides in understanding how humans develop by editing DNA in embryonic cells. How does CRISPR work? Feng Zhang explains with a nursery rhymeVolume 90%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard ShortcutsEnabledDisabledPlay/PauseSPACEIncrease Volume↑Decrease Volume↓Seek Forward→Seek Backward←Captions On/OffcFullscreen/Exit FullscreenfMute/UnmutemSeek %0-9 facebook twitter Email Linkhttps://www.statnews.com/2015/12/02/cambridge-gene-editing-debate/?jwsource=clCopied EmbedCopiedLive00:0001:5201:52  Studying animals like mice and monkeys can provide some insight, Jaenisch said, but “it’s important to really confirm that in human embryos.”advertisement However, “to work with human embryos doesn’t mean we want to implant them,” he emphasized.Gene editing in humans has garnered lots of attention lately because of a new technology called CRISPR that makes the process faster, easier, and more precise. Jaenisch said that his lab can use CRISPR to genetically alter mice in a matter of weeks when previously it could have taken two years.The technology has been embraced by thousands of researchers, in local labs in Kendall Square and around the world. Companies, including Cambridge, Mass.-based Editas Medicine and CRISPR Therapeutics, are also trying to leverage the method to improve drug discovery.One concern nagging CRISPR has been that, despite its improvements over other methods, it still leads to errors in the editing process. Researchers have been working to refine the tool, and on Tuesday, scientists at the Broad Institute, including CRISPR pioneer Feng Zhang, debuted their latest finding, a slightly tweaked version of the key enzyme that cuts down on what are known as “off-target effects.”Labs around the world will have access to the enzyme, according to the Broad, which will further aid basic research. But at the same time, as the technology improves and CRISPR becomes safer to use in people, it seems likely that the ethical debate will only intensify.last_img read more

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5 top blunders life science startups make on the road to clinical trials

first_imgFirst Opinion5 top blunders life science startups make on the road to clinical trials By Laurie Halloran Aug. 25, 2016 Reprints @HalloranConsult Privacy Policy Misidentifying key audiencesIt’s essential to recognize that the Food and Drug Administration and other regulatory bodies are your customers right now — not investors, physicians, your board, or even patients. Focus on the relevant audience(s) in each stage of the process. Understand that as the work progresses, your targets may change. Tags biotechclinical trialsstartups Investing in a startup? Follow the data, not the herd APStock Falling in love with your dreamsA classic mistake is mistrusting or not believing that data from early-development and preclinical studies is relevant to designing clinical trials. Forging ahead while disregarding safety issues that emerged from an early development program can be a disastrous oversight. Take a lesson from the Hippocratic oath and do no harm. Ignoring safety issues sets a fragile foundation that can potentially hurt people and ultimately sink a venture.Not acknowledging that others may know betterIt’s easy for a company founder or early-development team to think they know what needs to be done. But realistic and perceptive advice offered by senior operational people — whether they are consultants or employees — can be essential. Seek feedback from anyone in the know and remain open to varied opinions, even if they don’t necessarily agree with yours. Suffering from myopiaDon’t believe that the physicians and researchers on your board (whether it’s a board of directors, a scientific advisory board, or a medical advisory board) are the only people whose opinions matter. Yes, they are experts, but they aren’t always close enough to think through the details. Seek out and listen to diverse opinions from people with related and meaningful experiences, not just those with lofty titles.advertisementcenter_img Please enter a valid email address. NewslettersSign up for The Readout Your daily guide to what’s happening in biotech. Leave this field empty if you’re human: Ignoring potential hurdlesDesigning and executing a clinical development plan is difficult work that can demand day-to-day effort. But it’s also important to look ahead and anticipate the risks inherent in early clinical development. Have a crisis management and communications plan at the ready just in case things don’t go as planned.The takeaway from these slip-ups is that people running startup ventures must be willing to be open, expect the unexpected, and think beyond their own experiences. Biotech passion projects can save and improve lives, and may even turn into big businesses. While a startup in this industry can have exciting potential, the hard work invested in it will bear fruit only if its product succeeds in clinical evaluation and clinical trials. Keep yourself on track, learn to swallow your pride, and your startup might just make it big.Laurie Halloran is founder, president, and CEO of Halloran Consulting. Hundreds of biotech companies spring to life each year in pursuit of the same basic goal: to make it big.Some succeed. Genzyme began in 1981 as a startup with a handful of employees in an old clothing warehouse on the edge of what was then known as the “Combat Zone” — Boston’s red light district. Others do well, though maybe not on the Genzyme scale. Many more startups fail.One exceedingly tricky step is designing and executing the programs needed to move a product through clinical evaluation and clinical trials. As a consultant who advises young biotech companies on regulatory and clinical strategies, I’ve seen companies execute this flawlessly and others fail miserably. Here are five of the costliest missteps that startups make.advertisement Laurie Halloran [email protected] About the Author Reprints Related:last_img read more

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Children with Down syndrome live good lives. Prenatal testing shouldn’t nudge parents toward pregnancy termination

first_imgTesting for danger. Medical professionals typically do not offer tests for conditions that are innocuous or beneficial. Prenatal tests for Down syndrome — especially new ones of the noninvasive variety — are often offered to women in the first trimester of pregnancy. Tests for hepatitis B and C, rubella, rhesus sensitization, and sexually transmitted infections such as syphilis and HIV may be discussed at the same prenatal appointment. This practice conveys a message that Down syndrome is pathological, something to be avoided. In sociologist Gareth Thomas’s study of Down syndrome screening in the United Kingdom, he quotes a midwife who observes, “I think people have a tendency to accept what is offered to them because they think you wouldn’t offer it if there wasn’t a good reason to have it.” Offering a test for Down syndrome alongside tests for conditions like HIV reinforces the idea that this syndrome is hazardous.Standard of care. To make matters worse, physicians, midwives, and other prenatal caregivers are virtually required to offer all pregnant women prenatal testing for Down syndrome, since that is the current standard of care. The courts have defined standard of care as the obligation of health care providers to practice in accordance with the conduct of other qualified care providers in similar circumstance; these practices are often reflected in clinical guidelines. Failing to follow the standard of care opens prenatal caregivers to being sued for malpractice. So they offer these tests even though people with Down syndrome tend to lead good lives.In an ideal world, open and comprehensive communication between caregivers and prospective parents could help avoid the influence of subtle negative messages about Down syndrome. Parents should make the decision to have prenatal testing for Down syndrome only after being provided accurate information about the condition and about prenatal testing. It should be clear to parents that testing is not mandatory. Care providers should also present a realistic and non-demeaning portrayal of people with Down syndrome. By Chris Kaposy May 18, 2018 Reprints Newsletters Sign up for First Opinion A weekly digest of our opinion column, with insight from industry experts. New genetic technologies. Abortion. Who gets to be born and who doesn’t. Ethical issues at the beginning of life are some of the things I think about as a bioethicist. They took on new significance for me when prenatal testing revealed to my wife and me that our baby would have Down syndrome. Three months later, Aaron was born. As I wrote recently in the New York Times, it was a joyous occasion for us. Now 9 years old, Aaron approaches life with an infectious smile and laughter.Parents like us who choose to continue a pregnancy after learning their child has Down syndrome are in the minority. Most such prospective parents choose instead to terminate the pregnancy.When I share those statistics with friends and colleagues, they are often surprised, even shocked. Many people don’t see Down syndrome as a condition so dire that it warrants abortion. For them, individuals with Down syndrome tend to have good, happy lives, and their families do just as well as families that don’t have kids with disabilities. Somehow these beliefs about Down syndrome co-exist in our culture with beliefs that motivate most prospective parents to end such pregnancies.advertisement Leave this field empty if you’re human: My wife and I were given sensitive and helpful information throughout the prenatal testing process. Our experience was positive, which made it easier to welcome the idea of parenting a child with Down syndrome. But our experience might not reflect the reality of what many prospective parents go through. The discussion about consent for prenatal testing is often rushed, and the information presented about Down syndrome can be overly negative, focusing on the medical complications and cognitive limitations associated with it. Some studies show that the consent discussion is excessively devoted to explaining the complicated technical details of prenatal screening, with less time devoted to useful information about Down syndrome. Health care providers frequently expect their patients to get the necessary information about Down syndrome from pamphlets, which themselves can be inadequate or overly negative about Down syndrome.The prenatal testing industry is booming, with tests for more genetic indications continually being introduced to the health care market. As the parent of a child with Down syndrome, it troubles me to think that these tests contribute to the stigmatization of people like Aaron. They have the potential to institutionalize and embody a set of harmful values about what our children should be like, and who should walk this earth.Access to prenatal genetic information can be a good thing if it is done with sensitivity. The ability to choose abortion is a necessary right. But in our family, Aaron’s presence brings us joy every day.Chris Kaposy is an associate professor of bioethics at Memorial University in Canada and the author of “Choosing Down Syndrome: Ethics and New Prenatal Testing Technologies” (MIT Press, April 2018). Related: @ChrisKaposy Chris Kaposy [email protected] Tags children’s healthethicsgeneticscenter_img I believe that the widespread use of prenatal testing for Down syndrome is one reason behind the high termination rates. What is supposed to be a test that gives parents useful information has also, perhaps inadvertently, turned into an institutionalized signal to prospective parents and the wider culture that Down syndrome is something a family ought to avoid. This message persists in spite of the evidence of stability and well-being in families that include children with Down syndrome. Several features of prenatal testing suggest that the availability of these tests signal the undesirability of having a child with Down syndrome:advertisement Privacy Policy Please enter a valid email address. BERTRAND LANGLOIS/AFP/Getty Images The aging of the population with Down syndrome is a positive sign About the Author Reprints First OpinionChildren with Down syndrome live good lives. Prenatal testing shouldn’t nudge parents toward pregnancy termination last_img read more

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At Sanofi, a flu expert sees potential for improved vaccines

first_imgHealth At Sanofi, a flu expert sees potential for improved vaccines @HelenBranswell Tags businessinfectious diseaseSTAT+ Sanofi is one of the world’s leaders in influenza vaccine production, through its vaccine arm Sanofi Pasteur.And if anyone at Sanofi knows vaccines, it’s Dr. Gary Nabel, the company’s chief scientific officer, who happens to be a former head of the National Institutes of Health’s Vaccine Research Center. Helen Branswell What’s included? Dr. Gary Nabel, Sanofi’s chief scientific officer and a former head of the NIH’s Vaccine Research Center. Hyacinth Empinado/STAT STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Log In | Learn More Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Unlock this article — and get additional analysis of the technologies disrupting health care — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTED About the Author Reprints By Helen Branswell July 31, 2018 Reprints Senior Writer, Infectious Disease Helen covers issues broadly related to infectious diseases, including outbreaks, preparedness, research, and vaccine development. GET STARTED What is it?last_img read more

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