News / How a fake boycott set air cargo carrier and shipper relations back two decades

first_img Shippers and airlines have been calling for greater collaboration – but at no threat to forwarders in the air cargo chain.As Jason Frerich, Nike’s director global logistics infrastructure, noted at the WCS in Shanghai last week: “Forwarders serve a purpose. We couldn’t handle getting involved with all the airlines. The maritime side is different – there are fewer, larger players and it’s less fragmented.”There still seems, however, to be reluctance on the part of 3PLs to allow a stronger relationship between airline and shipper. And airlines – possibly for historical reasons – may have allowed that to happen.KLM Cargo’s reported foray into shipper talks in the 1990s has become the stuff of urban legend. At the time, the carrier was led by industry stalwart Jacques Ancher, who tasked Stan Wraight with the role of VP global cargo sales and marketing. By Alex Lennane and Stan Wraight 20/03/2015 Here, Mr Wraight explains what KLM was trying to do – and why it all went wrong.“At the time, all major airlines were talking directly to shippers, including Lufthansa, BA, AF, SAS, Swissair and many more. It was the norm.“The forwarder would direct cargo to the shipper or consignee’s favourite airline, so you needed to influence the shipper. This was less prevalent in Asia, but was certainly the rule in Europe and North America. So to say KLM Cargo was doing anything different is totally false – and it still irritates me to this day.”How did it all start?“KLM realised Europe’s carriers were heading into a brick wall on costs versus income. LH realised it too, but was less vocal. Integrators were taking the higher-yielding cargo, leaving scheduled carriers with low-yielding consolidations.“On a typical KLM 747 Combi flight from the Americas or Asia to Amsterdam in the late 80s to early 90s, we would see between 125 and 150 air waybills on board, with an average shipment weight below 300kg. This rapidly changed to around 20 air waybills with a much higher average weight, and much lower yield, as all the smaller high yielding traffic disappeared.“We were carrying the tonnage, but the yield was getting to the point where we could not sustain the costs.“Something had to be done. KLM’s answer was to separate the cargo into segments: one was called Business Unit Cargo – the bulk – for low-value commodity traffic. The rest would be segmented by product type – live animals, valuables, pharma, dangerous goods, etc.“It was exactly what LH Cargo was thinking too, and it introduced its TD line of products. It went one step further by ordering a huge fleet of MD11Fs, with less capacity than the 747F but providing the ability to offer a daily service to major points to make its product line competitive.“Make no mistake, the products were never targeted just at forwarders. The hope was it would be used by anyone, including shippers and consignees looking to integrators or consolidations for solutions.“LH progressed its strategy in public, but in a much stealthier way, with little controversy. KLM Cargo went public through its popular magazine Cargovision. In trying to be honest about the market changes, we set ourselves up for a backlash, which in actual fact had nothing to do with talking to shippers.”Why was KLM so transparent?“We honestly believed there were enough people out there who would understand what was happening, and would accept that things had to change. We had excellent relations with the likes of Panalpina, DHL, and MSAS in the UK, AEI in the US and many others that really counted. Our global market share was huge, and the yield very respectable for the times.“99.9% of everything we carried involved a forwarder; the few that didn’t insisted on dealing direct with all carriers, not just KLM, and had deals with all the major airlines. There were a lot of ‘triangle deals’ where all three parties (shipper, airline, forwarder) would sit together and work out accountabilities to make it work. It was open and transparent.”So what went wrong?“One day I started getting phone calls from a few major forwarders in the UK and Switzerland. They were being asked to comment by a prestigious air cargo journal on a boycott of KLM due to us talking to shippers directly. The forwarders called me because they valued the relationship we had.“This was not totally unexpected as we had been open about where the industry should go. But a boycott was ridiculous as we had a real partnership with the forwarders.“I quickly found out the true motives behind the story. The journal’s sources were two European forwarders who were in a dispute with us over commissions. The turnover and tonnages they provided did not warrant the commissions they had been receiving, so we had stopped them.Stan Wraight“But the ‘boycott’ was a good story, and I am sure a lot of readers believed it – although it would have been illegal.“But it never happened. We continued to grow, while the two forwarding managers who made up the story no longer work there.“It’s worth remembering that forwarders also had to deal with the attack on business from integrators, and they couldn’t stop using scheduled airlines. The dialogue had to continue, and it did.”What impact did the news have on the industry?“It probably made some of the less-professional airlines very wary of making any bold steps. And as change requires investment in both people and infrastructure, it probably set them back years.“The forwarders that counted for KLM at the time rallied around us, and their support was unwavering. But one airline cannot change an entire industry’s mindset, unfortunately, and what was true in Europe was not necessarily true elsewhere.”Is that still being felt now?“It is: just look at what is happening to legacy airlines in Europe. Jacques Ancher tried to warn everyone about what was coming, and for the most part it has all come true. Scheduled airlines, especially in Europe, are faced with a tremendous cost burden that Middle Eastern and Asian carriers don’t have. North American airlines solved their cost issues through consolidation and Chapter 11, and great names like Pan Am, TWA, Northwest, Continental are now gone as a consequence. European airlines don’t have that option and are struggling, and cargo seems to be taking the greatest hit.”Jaques AncherDo carriers’ current fears of speaking directly to shippers stem from the KLM story?“The problem today is not about talking directly to shippers or consignees. That ship has passed, and eventually the internet will take care of it. The issue today is that scheduled airlines cannot compete unless they create new markets, and make air cargo more accessible to principals.“Air cargo’s focus should not be on higher-yield commodities only. It should open up via a transparent pricing platform that serves the airlines’ and principals’ needs. The larger customers can access pricing that recognises their value to airlines, but in general it should be as easy to book air cargo as it is to book a passenger ticket.“It will happen, the only question is when. At some point, scheduled airlines’ cargo divisions will become nothing more than contribution margin suppliers, especially in Europe.“The world changes so fast – ecommerce changed retail outlets in the blink of an eye. Change will be through further consolidation in the industry and that will force some airlines that don’t invest in cargo to participate through offering capacity via the internet at the lowest cost possible.“All cargo airlines, and those that still want to participate in the scheduled airline segment, might make it a good point in the coming months to dig out old copies of KLM’s Cargovision.“Everything that was said in there has come true, and it still has a good insight into what the future holds. And that message is for airlines and forwarders alike.”last_img read more

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Premium / Q&A with Dan Gardner – carriers must hunker down, hope ‘manipulation of supply does the trick financially’

first_imgBy Alessandro Pasetti 09/03/2020 Subscription required for Premium stories In order to view the entire article please login with a valid subscription below or register an account and subscribe to Premium Premium subscriber LOGIN I recently asked Dan Gardner, president of Los-Angeles based Trade Facilitators, to expand on some of the very pertinent topics that he nailed down in a white paper headed “The Novel Coronavirus: China’s ’Standing 8-Count’”, with a strong focus from me on the prospects and current dealings of the container shipping companies, in particular.Here is a link to Mr Gardner’s paper – outlining key characteristics of Chinese supply chains and the probability of supply chain bottlenecks, as well as others of great interest … Password* Forgotten your password? Please click here Reset New Premium subscriber REGISTER Please either REGISTER or login below to continue LOGIN Please Login Email* Email* Reset Your Password << Go backlast_img read more

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Pharmalot, Pharmalittle: Merck drug wins FDA nod as first-line lung cancer treatment

first_imgPharmalotPharmalot, Pharmalittle: Merck drug wins FDA nod as first-line lung cancer treatment [email protected] Pharmaceutical and alcohol companies are donating to anti-marijuana campaigns in five states — Arizona, Massachusetts, Maine, Nevada and California — where votes will be held next month on whether to legalize marijuana, the Guardian writes. Drug makers fear that fewer prescriptions may be written for their painkillers. One recent study found fewer Medicare prescriptions were written in states where marijuana is legalized.The Sarepta Therapeutics drug for Duchenne muscular dystrophy has provided “a worrisome model for the next generation of molecularly targeted therapies,” write two Harvard Medical School professors in JAMA. The FDA approval may embolden drug makers to “demonstrate a slight difference in a laboratory test, activate the patient community, win approval, and charge high prices, while relying on limited regulatory follow-up.”advertisement About the Author Reprints Ed Silverman Pfizer cut the price of its Enbrel rheumatoid arthritis and psoriasis treatment by 20 percent in Ireland, the Irish Times reports. The move is part of a agreement reached between the government and the pharmaceutical industry to cut prices for biologics by 20 percent once they lose patent protection and face direct competition. Enbrel lost patent protection in Europe earlier this year, and Biogen introduced Benepali into the Irish market in September.The Food and Drug Administration is planning a study to determine whether animation may distort how consumers perceive the risks and benefits of a medicine, but some drug makers are unhappy with the questions the agency plans to ask, according to Regulatory Focus. Remarks filed by some companies suggest they are hesitant to see how such limited research could actually lead to new policies or guidance.Concordia International, which has gained a reputation for aggressively hiking prices of its medicines, says its chairman and chief executive, Mark Thompson, is resigning, Pharmafile writes. The drug maker, whose stock has been plummeting, drew attention last May for increasing the price fourteenfold of eye drops that the UK’s National Health Service relies on to treat bacterial conjunctivitis.India’s Supreme Court will hear the government’s petition to transfer cases filed against its ban on hundreds of fixed dose combination drugs, the Economic Times tells us. The government, which banned drugs that were alleged to be irrational, unsafe for patients, and lacking scientific validation, filed petitions against several drug makers that are contesting the ban. A hearing is set for Nov. 7.Indian regulators caught Wanbury relabeling the diabetes drug metformin hydrochloride that was made at a third-party site and illegally exporting it as its own product to Bangladesh, Pakistan, Brazil, and Mexico, the Economic Times tells us. The Maharashtra Food and Drug Administration says it is looking into other companies that could be engaging in the same practice. Alex Hogan/STATcenter_img Hello, everyone, and how are you today? We are just fine, thank you, despite overcast skies hovering above the Pharmalot campus. Our shortest person has trotted off to the local schoolhouse, the official mascots are happily snoozing here and there, and we are quaffing cups of stimulation. What could be better? We hope your own day is getting off to a good start and, on that note, here are some tidbits to help you along. Hope all goes well and do keep in touch …Merck won earlier-than-expected US regulatory approval for its Keytruda drug as a first-line treatment in lung cancer patients, cementing its lead over rivals. Separately, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network rejected Merck’s bid to list a combination of Keytruda and chemotherapy in its compendia of treatment guidelines. Sanford Bernstein analyst Tim Anderson wrote the decision was not a surprise, since Merck submitted a small Phase 2 study.The pharmaceutical industry trade group is requiring members to pay an additional $100 million per year to fund a post-election battle over drug prices, Politico reports. The Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America is hiking membership dues by 50 percent in order to have $300 million on hand annually. The trade group is gearing up to spend hundreds of millions on ads pushing back against politicians from both parties who have attacked pricing.advertisement By Ed Silverman Oct. 25, 2016 Reprints Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. @Pharmalot Tags cancerdrug pricesMercklast_img read more

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Manulife to provide Vitality members with Garmin fitness-tracking devices

first_img Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Toronto-based Manulife Financial Corp. has partnered with Olathe, Kan.-based Garmin International Inc. to provide the wearable fitness-tracking devices that will be used in the insurance firm’s new “Vitality” program. The initiative is meant to reward individuals with select new life insurance policies for healthy living and is slated to launch later this year. Manulife will provide Vitality program members with a free Garmin “vívofit 3” wearable activity device that will track physical activities that can include running, biking and swimming, according to an announcement released Thursday. Those physical activities — in addition to other health-related activities, such as receiving a flu shot or a undergoing a health screening — will help the program member earn points over the course of a year. Those points will determine their status in the program, which, in turn, can lead to rewards and benefits for the member. Manulife announced in February that it would partner with Chicago-based Vitality Group Inc., a wellness program provider, to make the program available in Canada. The Canadian firm’s U.S. subsidiary, Boston-based John Hancock Life Insurance Co., had launched a similar initiative for the U.S. market in April 2015. “Vitality research shows that wearable technology is effective when paired with the right incentives,” says Alan Pollard, CEO of the Vitality Group, in a statement. “Combining the features of a free Garmin device with Vitality incentives is a strong motivator to help people get active and improve their health.” Manulife’s program is currently targeted to those with individual life insurance policies, but the firm states in its announcement that it is investigating opportunities to make the program available through other products. Insurance: Tracking clients Manulife program focused on rewarding healthy living Photo copyright: Bloomberg Tessie Sanci Wealthsimple’s peer-to-peer app goes national Keywords Mobile applications and devicesCompanies Manulife Financial Corp. center_img RBC adds AI-powered budgeting feature to mobile app Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Related news Digital identity verification comes to Canadian financial institutionslast_img read more

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Parliament threatens Australia’s access to news

first_imgParliament threatens Australia’s access to news The Australian Taxpayers’ Alliance, the nations’ largest grassroots advocacy group representing taxpayers, today condemns the News Media and Digital Platforms Mandatory Bargaining Code before parliament which if passed will legislate that Facebook and Google pay media outlets for access to their news stories.“The Mandatory Bargaining Code if enacted would force platforms like Google and Facebook to subsidise Australian media,” said ATA Policy Director, Emilie Dye. “In political circles that’s called protectionism.”“The last thing we need in a post-covid economy is more unfair regulation. The ACCC basically wants to force successful companies to use their profits to support less successful companies.”“If this bill passes it puts these platforms between a rock and a hard place. They must decide between giving their profits to Australian media outlets or getting rid of Australian news content completely.”“This blll is unjust and short-sighted. It will hurt the Australian people the most. If Facebook and Google refuse to pay up and forego sharing Australian news, it is the Australian people who will become less informed about today’s world.”“The Australian government must resist kowtowing to Australian media and recognise that you cannot punish platforms for profiting from a changing media landscape. It is not Facebook’s fault that print media is out of vogue. The Australian parliament needs to come to it’s senses and say no to Mandatory Bargaining Code Bill.” /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:ACCC, Australia, Australian, Australian Government, Australian Taxpayers Alliance, digital, Economy, Facebook, Force, Google, Government, Media, parliament, protectionism, regulation, worldlast_img read more

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Ministerial appointment: Stuart Robert

first_imgMinisterial appointment: Stuart Robert To serve the Australian people as a minister in the Morrison Government is a great honour. I thank the Prime Minister for the opportunity to serve as Minister for Employment, Workforce, Skills, Small and Family Business.As the Prime Minister has said, a key priority for the government is to cement our economic recovery to create more jobs.Australia’s comeback is well under way. We need to ensure it continues.As Minister for Employment, Workforce, Skills, Small and Family Business, my priority will be to continue the comeback through building a workforce that can drive Australia’s prosperity.Workforce participation for women, a care workforce for our aged, our people with disability and our veterans is critical to the success of this prosperity. We also need to ensure Australians have the skills to build this workforce.We also need to ensure the backbone of Australia’s economic prosperity-small and family business-are given every opportunity to thrive.I look forward to continuing the great work of Senator the Hon Michaela Cash to ensure everyone has the opportunity to get a job, train for a job or build a business.To serve as Minister for the National Disability Insurance Scheme and Minister for Government Services has been both rewarding and challenging. The NDIS is now available everywhere across Australia. There are now over 430,000 Australians in the Scheme. In 2020, 100 per cent of access decisions to the NDIS were made within the 21 day timeframe-in June 2019, it was taking an average of 42 days to make an access decision.I am incredibly proud of transformation in Services Australia towards delivering a simple, helpful, respectful and transparent service for all Australians. Its success can be measured-the days of spending hours on the phone waiting to speak to Centrelink are over. The average speed of answer in July-February 2019-20 was 15 minutes with 13 million busy signals. For July-February 2020-21 it was 4 minutes average speed of answer and only 706 busy signals.Throughout bushfires, a pandemic and floods, all my departments and agencies have excelled and delivered during time in need and I thank everyone for their hard work and service.I congratulate Senator the Hon Linda Reynolds ASC on her appointment as Minister for the National Disability Insurance Scheme and Minister for Government Services. I am confident Senator Reynolds will continue to deliver on the Morrison Government’s priority to guarantee the essential services Australians rely on.I want to also thank the people of Fadden for their continued faith in me to deliver as their local Member of Parliament. It is that faith that enables me to continue to deliver for the Gold Coast whilst acting to cement our economic recovery by creating more jobs in today’s challenging world. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:AusPol, Australia, Australian, bushfires, disability, employment, Gold Coast, Government, insurance, insurance scheme, Morrison, Morrison Government, National Disability Insurance Scheme, NDIS, parliament, Prime Minister, Skills, social serviceslast_img read more

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Turning the Tables on Ray Fister

first_imgHome Wine Business Editorial Turning the Tables on Ray FisterWine Business EditorialTurning the Tables on Ray FisterBy Expert Editorial – October 5, 2020 396 0 Share Facebook Twitter ReddIt Advertisement TAGSCarl GiavantiCarl Giavanti ConsultingfeaturedRay FisterTurning the Tables – Interviewing the InterviewersWine Writing center_img AdvertisementBy Carl Giavanti, Carl Giavanti Consulting“Turning the Tables – Interviewing the Interviewers” is a Q&A series profiling Wine Writers. We hope you’ll discover more about the wine writers you know, and learn about many others. The objective of this project is to understand and develop working relationships with journalists. They are after all, those that help tell our stories, review our wines and potentially provide media coverage. You can do this by learning their wine and writing backgrounds, story and personal interests, palate preferences, writing challenges and pet peeves. This is part of an ongoing series that will be featured monthly by Wine Industry Network.RAY FISTER is the creator and producer of the podcast, Life Between the Vines, which has been in production since 2008.  He can certainly be referred to as chief-cook-and-bottle-washer as he writes, interviews, records, videos, edits and produces each program. Mr. Fister was born and raised in Cleveland, Ohio with a love for Indians baseball as well as watching Jim Brown play football in the 1960’s.  He has been a musician since his early teens and still performs in bands to this day.  Ray is a professional audio engineer for over 40 years and is owner of 5th Floor Recording Company which is located in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, his current home. Wine is a great passion for Ray.  His first trip to Napa Valley back in 2001 took that passion to higher level.  He started Life Between the Vines podcast in 2008 and has recorded interviews with over 600 wine industry professionals.  The podcast focus has always been to make wine “less scary”. Ray wanted to let winemakers tell their own stories in their own words, humor and style.  Podcast #400 will run in mid-summer of this year. Ray is the wine contributor to Milwaukee’s NPR station WUWM Lake Effect program.He has hosted countless charity tastings and wine events. Ray lives with his life partner Kathryn, on a horse ranch, south of the city of Milwaukee. When he is not enjoying his humble wine collection, he writes songs, chases his cats and dog and does a bit of editing.You can follow Ray and Life Between the Vines on Facebook and Instagram, and watch and listen on his YouTube site. Professional BackgroundHow did you come to wine, and using video and podcasts as your medium?  I learned a bit about wine in the late 70’s working at a grocery store in the beverage aisle.  From there, wine got it hooks in me.  You never stop learning and wine provides a fun and educational challenge.  As an audio professional, I wanted to let winemakers and vintners tell their stories.  On two occasions I was able to work for a week during crush (Napa Valley and Anderson Valley) to peek “behind the curtain” and document what that life is all about.  What are your long-range plans for “Life Between The Vines”?  To grow the podcast and videos while becoming a household name in wine.  I am living my dream producing this podcast.Is it possible to make a living as a wine videographer today? If so, how have you succeeded? If not, why not? What are the primary challenges and hurdles you face?  I have to say it would be difficult to make a full time living as a videographer in this industry seeing how the tools are accessible to most everyone these days.  I have succeeded because I have been in the production industry for over 40 years. As well as producing the podcast for 12 years.  Experience pays off.   I genuinely like people.  The major challenges are lighting, noisy set and airplanes on outdoor interviews.  Personal BackgroundWhat would people be surprised to know about you?  First, I engineered all the audio for the Jeffrey Dahmer trial for Court TV.  Second, I am a rabid Beatles fan and collect records and memorabilia.  Third, I’ve recorded segments for the Simpsons and Family Guy tv shows.  Fourth, I play the ukulele…poorly.What haven’t you done, that you’d like to do?  Meet George Harrison What’s the best video you have done? Please provide a link. My favorite videos are from Premiere Napa Valley.  I’ve attended PNV 10 times and I do brief interviews with as many as 30+ winemakers during the barrel tasting.  I shoot video with an SLR camera, record audio on a Zoom unit all while trying to keep the same wine glass I started the morning with.  It keeps me on my toes and I have more fun than I can say doing these.  I usually choose a subject and main question which sets up the video.  Fours hours and I’m knocked out.  Here is the link to PNV 2020:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6GshUzgNIQ8&t=20s What’s your primary business occupation? Will you ever transition to wine only?  I own a small commercial post production audio studio and yes, it is my intention to transition to wine full time.Writing ProcessCan you describe your approach to doing interviews?  I love interviewing winemakers.  I am a people person and that gives me the ability to communicate easily.  I do minimal prep so I can make the interview a conversation.  It is super important to listen to my guest’s answers!  I will be self-deprecating to have a bit of fun as we go and get my guest to open up with more interesting and fun stories.  I can be a bit silly.There are many winemaker podcasts and videos out there. What makes your special? We focus on top audio quality recordings for all our programs.  That is a high priority.  We maintain that attitude for every single program.Do you work on an editorial schedule and/or develop story ideas as they come up? Generally, no.  Some of my guests are referred and some I find after I’ve tasted their wines.  I am lucky to have a great support network of PR folks that are simply fantastic and help find interesting people for me to chat with.Do you post your content on social media? Why is that important? Yes, I use social media constantly.  Specifically, Facebook and Instagram and YouTube.Working RelationshipsWhat are your recommendations to wineries when working with media?  Have fun and try not to take an interview too serious.  Don’t ask for questions in advance so you can be spontaneous. Be sincere.What advantages are there in working directly with winery publicists?  Many of the PR firms I work with do a great job of setting up interviews for me in advance.  They solve location issues as well as introduce our podcast to prospects.Which wine personalities would you most like to meet and taste with (living or dead)?  Robert Mondavi.  John Daniel Jr.  Andre Tchelistcheff.  Gerald Casale.  Sam Neill.  Steven Spurrier.  Gustavo Brambila.  Leisure TimeIf you take days off, how do you spend them? Writing music, bicycling, reading and recording music.What is your most memorable wine or wine tasting experience?  There are so many.  Tasting Mouton Rothschild with friends for the first time…that was nice. Really, the best is with some dear friends who live in Napa and are in the industry.  We eat, we laugh, we make fun of each other.  Life is good.What’s your cure for a wine hangover?  Sleep and Tylenol.What’s your favorite wine region in the world? Napa and Sonoma.Do you have a favorite wine and food pairing? Favorite recipe/pairing? Best pairing, Sauvignon Blanc and scallops.  Fav recipe, home-made pizza and Cabernet Sauvignon.Read more stories in the series “Turning the Tables – Interviewing the Interviewers.”Expert Editorialby Carl Giavanti, Carl Giavanti ConsultingCARL GIAVANTI is a Winery Publicist with a DTC Marketing background. He’s going on his 10th year of winery consulting. Carl has been involved in business marketing and public relations for over 25 years; originally in technology, digital marketing and project management, and now as a winery media relations consultant. Clients are or have been in Napa Valley, Willamette Valley, and the Columbia Gorge. (www.CarlGiavantiConsulting.com/Media). Pinterest Linkedin Previous articleAfternoon Brief, October 2Next articleLineage Wine Company Releases 100-Point 2017 “Lineage” Cabernet Blend  Expert Editorial Emaillast_img read more

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One Killed, Seven Injured In Motor Vehicle Accident

first_imgRelatedOne Killed, Seven Injured In Motor Vehicle Accident RelatedOne Killed, Seven Injured In Motor Vehicle Accident FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Forty-one year-old Devon Morris of Race Course, Clarendon was killed and seven others injured after the vehicles in which they were passengers crashed on the Spur Tree main road in Manchester last night.The ages of the injured seven – all men – range between 19 and 55.Information received is that about 8:00 p.m., a GMC motor truck with six passengers aboard, was heading towards St. Elizabeth. On reaching the Spur Tree main road the driver lost control of the vehicle which overturned and crashed into a Mercedes Benz motor car which was traveling in the same direction. The impact caused the Benz to overturn also. Morris, the driver of the Benz and the other six passengers of the truck were all injured. They were taken to the Mandeville Hospital where Morris died; another was treated and released while the other six were admitted in stable condition.The Mandeville Police are investigating Advertisementscenter_img One Killed, Seven Injured In Motor Vehicle Accident TransportJune 19, 2010 RelatedOne Killed, Seven Injured In Motor Vehicle Accidentlast_img read more

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Major Investment Projects in Shipping and Logistics

first_imgRelatedMajor Investment Projects in Shipping and Logistics By Allan Brooks, JIS Senior Reporter RelatedMajor Investment Projects in Shipping and Logistics FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail A package of investment projects, for the development of the country’s shipping and logistics industry is to be facilitated by the Government of Jamaica. This was announced by Minister of Industry, Investment and Commerce, Hon. Anthony Hylton, as he presented the Ministry’s “integrated 10-point strategy” on Tuesday (February 28), during a media briefing at his New Kingston offices. Mr. Hylton stated that the investment opportunity is “considerable” and involved a number of projects that have the potential to transform the country’s economic landscape.  These comprise: dredging of the Kingston Harbour and expansion of the port facilities; establishing a dry dock facility at Jackson Bay in Clarendon and a bunkering facility at Cow Bay in Yallahs, St. Thomas; construction of a cargo and maintenance, repair and operations (MRO) facility at Vernamfield in Clarendon; and the development of the Caymanas Economic Zone. “Altogether, these projects represent a potential investment effort that will drive growth and employment for many years, positioning Jamaica as the logistic hub for trade in the Americas,” the Minister declared. The Minister observed that major developments in the global shipping and logistics industry and the geography of global trade have created an enviable economic opportunity for Jamaica.  He said that despite the challenges presented by the economic environment, “Jamaica is poised to take advantage of the window of opportunity to establish itself as a major hub for shipping and logistics in the Western Hemisphere.” He explained that the Ministry’s role is to help in “defining the investment opportunities and to work across ministries to implement this vision.” Major Investment Projects in Shipping and Logistics CommerceMarch 1, 2012 RelatedMajor Investment Projects in Shipping and Logistics Advertisementslast_img read more

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Deutsche Telekom slates EC Dutch merger concerns

first_img Previous ArticleMeituan Dianping raises $4B via IPONext ArticleInterview: Wipro Deutsche TelekomECNetherlandsTele2 European Commission (EC) objections to a proposed merger of T-Mobile Netherlands and Tele2 Netherlands centres on a belief the deal will ultimately lead to higher prices, Deutsche Telekom revealed.T-Mobile’s parent announced it had received a statement of objections from the EC which, at heart, argues the reduction in the number of mobile operators in the Netherlands from four to three would impact competition, particularly in the consumer segment, and so increase prices.Deutsche Telekom said it and Sweden-based Tele2 disagree with the EC’s objections, noting the merged entity would have a market share of around 25 per cent, still well behind the country’s top two players KPN and VodafoneZiggo.The companies also noted discounts offered by rivals as part of their fixed-mobile bundles are the key drivers of competition in the market. T-Mobile acquired Vodafone’s fixed assets in the country in 2016, a requirement imposed on the latter as part of its merger with Ziggo.UntraditionalDeutsche Telekom and Tele2 also said EC concerns over the reduction in operator numbers are somewhat unfounded: the merger “is not a traditional” four-to-three deal “since Tele2 NL is, to a large extent, dependent on the network of T-Mobile NL to offer its mobile services”. As a result, the tie-up would create a “third sustainable player in the key segment of fixed-mobile services” without reducing competition.Finally, the pair again argued combining their Netherlands operations would deliver the scale required to “counter the dominance of KPN and VodafoneZiggo”, which currently face no resistance to increasing fixed broadband prices.WindowDeutsche Telekom noted Netherlands competition regulator ACM had expressed concern about the dominance of KPN and VodafoneZiggo. It also criticised the EC for failing to recognise the benefits the operators say the merger will create “despite all the time the process has taken and the voluminous amount of information provided”. The window of opportunity for the combination is “closing fast”, it added.The EC opened a probe into the deal in June. While it initially targeted a completion date of 17 October, the deadline was subsequently extended for an unspecified period. Subscribe to our daily newsletter Back Home Deutsche Telekom slates EC Dutch merger concerns Operators back Qualcomm role in open RAN path Michael Carroll Author AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 13 SEP 2018 Deutsche Telekom eyes 5G, fibre lead Deutsche Telekom, SoftBank tipped for T-Mobile trade Related Michael doesn’t want to admit that he has been a journalist and editor for close to 20 years covering a diverse set of subjects including shipping and shipbuilding, fixed and mobile telecoms, and motorcycling…More Read more Tags last_img read more

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