Is Free Health Care Actually Free?

first_imgPosted on September 13, 2011August 15, 2016Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The financing scheme in Sierra Leone that provides free health care to pregnant women, lactating mothers and children under five is one that we’ve covered before on the blog and the MH Buzz. Many of the discussions about the program have indicated that there is greater access to maternal and child health services, but a new report from Amnesty International finds that many people are unable to access care or are being required to pay for services that should be free:But for many women and girls the promise of the free health care has not been fulfilled. In interviews, women and girls who had tried to access the health care system after the launch of FHCI told Amnesty International that they were unable to access drugs or care.Women and girls report two significant problems with the FHCI: either drugs and other essential medical supplies are simply not available at the health facilities, or they are charged for medicines and care that are supposed to be provided for free.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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8 steps to captivating clients on LinkedIn

first_imgWant to get more clients through LinkedIn?Just focus on what clients care about: what you can do for them.1. Compel clients to read your profile with your headlineMake clients want to learn more about you by focusing your headline—the most important part of your profile—on their needs and how you can help them meet those needs. If your headline is something like:“Jane Doe, independent business owner” or“Bob Smith, freelance writer,”the client won’t find you on a search or read your profile. Neither of these headlines is informative or engaging. “Independent business owner” doesn’t even tell the prospect that the person is a freelancer, and “freelance writer” is too vague.But:“Jane Doe, freelance writer helping the financial services industry win and keep customers”is a compelling headline because it focuses on the need of clients in financial services to grow their business (by getting new customers and keeping current customers).Write the rest of your profile first and then come back to your headline. Spend extra time and effort on this.2. Show you’re a pro with your photoYou’re 7 times more likely to be found on searches if your profile has a photo. Any photo won’t do. If you want clients to think you’re a competent professional, you need a professional head and shoulders shot. Don’t use a photo with your pet or your kid, a photo from a party, a photo where you’re wearing sunglasses, etc.3. Engage clients with a clear, concise summaryThe summary is the second most important part of your profile. Clearly and concisely summarize your freelance services and your experience. Your experience should cover your freelance work and other relevant experience. Focus on how you help clients in what you include and how you say it.4. Tell clients what to doInclude a call to action in your summary and again later in your profile. A call to action tells clients what you want them to do, for example, call or email, visit your website, connect on LinkedIn, or any combination of these. Put this at the end of your summary and again under additional information.5. Make it easy to contact youMake it easy for clients to contact you by including at least your email address and, if you’re comfortable, your phone number, in your LinkedIn header, summary, and under additional information. This is basic, but people often forget to do this. Include your website too so clients can easily learn more about you. Your header has a section called Contact Info just below the number of your connections.6. Make it easy to find youUse keywords in your headline, summary, and throughout your profile so that you’ll turn up more often on search results. Also include a list of keywords under additional information.On LinkedIn, people often look for keywords related to titles, so use keywords like:“freelancer” instead “freelance services”“freelance medical writer” instead of “freelance medical writing”“freelance editor” instead of “freelance editing”“freelance web designer” instead of “freelance web design.”7. Make it easy to learn moreInclude a link to your website so clients can learn more about you and see samples of your work, or at least descriptions of what you’ve done. Put the link in your header under contact information and in your call to actions (including in your summary). If you don’t have a website yet, post a few samples on your LinkedIn profile.8. Write captivating contentYour LinkedIn profile isn’t a resume. Make it easy to read (conversational) and interesting by:Writing short, action-oriented sentences and short paragraphs.Highlighting key messages with subheads, done in all caps.Using bulleted lists so clients can quickly scan your services and similar information.Get the clients you deserveDeveloping a captivating profile is the first step in using LinkedIn to get the clients you deserve.More clients will be able to find you, since you’ll rank higher on search results. And you’ll impress clients who hear about you from others and want to check you out before contacting you.What’s your compelling LinkedIn headline? Email and let me know: [email protected]last_img read more

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