For the Love of Hiking

first_img Stay Connected with the Daily Roundup. Sign up for our newsletter and get the best of the Beacon delivered every day to your inbox. The annoying whir of a fly or mosquito in my ears, the tug of my pack on tight shoulders, the burn in my calves and lungs as I push up a steep hill, the step-after-step pounding on my soles and occasionally on my soul — these aren’t my favorite things about hiking.And yet I’m addicted. At the end of the day, it feels so great to peel off soggy socks and dusty shoes and feel the strange buzz of exhaustion, which is adrenalized by both the relief and exhilaration of finishing a formidable hike. And the cold microbrew pulled out of a cooler in the car has never tasted so good.But it’s not just the rewards at the end of the hike that make it so intoxicating. Within the hard work are magical moments. The suspense and surprise of rounding a corner that reveals another dramatic peak, a glistening lake below the trail, or wildflowers spattered across meadows like paint on an artist’s palette. The snow patches blanketing rose-colored rock slabs, streams of clear water racing down mountainsides through feathery ferns and cushy moss, and the dew-kissed morning air taking on aromas of dry grass and dirt as the noon sun beats down on the trail. The rigors of hiking fade into the background when I remember the good times — the spectacular scenery and the memorable events that unfold in the unpredictable natural world. Here are a few of my favorite things about hiking.Piegan Mountain view. The views are specular at the top of this Glacier Park mountain where snow lingers into summer. All photos by Kay BjorkSummitsMost of our hikes are destination driven, and some of the most rewarding run out at the top of a mountain. Mountain summits can vary dramatically from a mellow ridge walk to a technical climb over vertical rock. I’m not fond of the more treacherous summits but have found plenty of moderate ascents that still offer the thrill of getting to the top, with virtually unobstructed views of mountains and valleys.Two of the most memorable summit hikes offer very different experiences because of location and accessibility affecting their popularity. Reynolds Mountain in Glacier Park is a seven-mile hike with a 2,500-foot elevation gain to reach the summit at 9,125 feet. It’s popular because it’s less technical than many of the summits in Glacier Park that are characterized by unstable sedimentary rock and routes with exposure.When we went, the first 1 ½ miles were more like hiking in the city, weaving through a crowd on the boardwalk, but changed quickly when we left the Hidden Lake trail at the high point, where we walked through a meadow splashed with colorful wildflowers, careful to avoid the fragile vegetation. We followed a primitive trail to reach the easiest route up the southwest side of Reynolds Peak, where the hike intensified. I became jittery as we started up a fairly steep talus slope and hikers above us kicked loose scree, which bounced wildly down the slope like popping corn. I was actually more at ease when we reached the narrow ledge along rock cliffs where I felt more protected. When we arrived at the top, I felt both relieved and ecstatic, surrounded by the spectacular views of Glacier Park circled by layers of craggy mountains spattered with snow, ice and turquoise lakes.At the south end of the Mission Range, Lindy Peak answered my love for solitude with its vague and often disappearing trail through forest, along a rock ridge and up a band of cliffs. Early on, a portion of the hike passed through heavy timber and turned into the notorious bushwhacking that seems to be inevitable on most of our hiking escapades. Finally, I was surprised and elated when we broke into a casual saunter through wildflowers and snowfields up a broad ridgeline to reach the top. The views were magnificent.The views seem endless from the top of Reynolds Mountain in Glacier Park.More Favorite Mountain PeaksMount Aeneas – Jewel BasinElevation – 7,525’Elevation gain – 1800’Distance – 6 miles* A busy trail, so it’s best if you go early in the morning or off-season. Highlights include great views of the basin and surrounding mountain chains and a good chance of seeing mountain goats.Sixmile Peak – Swan RangeElevation – 7,406’Elevation gain – 3,400’Distance – 9 miles* A steady and moderate grade gets you to the top, where you can see views of Swan and Flathead lakes, Glacier Park, Great Bear Wilderness, Bob Marshall Wilderness, Hungry Horse Reservoir and the Mission Mountains on the west side of the Swan Valley.Nasukoin Mountain – Whitefish RangeElevation – 8,086’Elevation gain – 3,000’Distance – 11.6 miles round trip* The highest point in Glacier View Ranger District with great views of the North Fork and Glacier Park.Pyramid Peak – Swan RangeElevation – 8,309’Elevation gain – 3,100’Distance – 12 miles* You reach Pyramid Lake before heading up the slope on the west side of the lake. It’s a nice place to take a break or have lunch.Warrior Mountain – Swan RangeElevation – 7,903’Elevation gain – Nearly 4,000’ on a roller coaster trailDistance – 12 miles* The Napa Point Trailhead is a scenic trail that rolls up and down an open ridgeline and affords great views of Swan Peak and the surrounding area. Warrior Mountain is reached by a relatively mellow ascent off of scenic Alpine Trail No. 7.Information on how to get there, plus other details are found on the U.S. Forest Service website: www.fs.usda.gov/activity/flathead/recreation/hiking. Click on the day hiking link for specific hike details.WildflowersWildflowers are like nature’s exclamation point. Even though they normally peak in July in subalpine country, the mountainside is usually peppered with some kind of flowers at various elevations from April into September. There are hundreds of wildflower species in Montana. One of the first to pop up in the spring is the glacier lily, which I think of as an excited child who can’t wait to see what’s next, because it often pushes its yellow blossom up through the snow. The arrowleaf balsamroot is another favorite, with its yellow daisy-like flowers and arrow-shaped leaves. They’re frequently found on sunny slopes. Bear grass is probably my favorite, with its star-like blossoms circling a tall stalk. It is a mystical experience to wade through flowers so deep and so tall that you can lose children and dogs in them.Indian paintbrush and fleabane daisy spill down the mountainside along the Birch Lake trail in the Jewel Basin.Favorite Wildflower LocationsWild Horse Island — Look for the arrowleaf balsamroot in May.Glacier Park — Logan Pass, the Highline Trail and the east side of Logan Pass are just a few of the places you can find dozens of wildflower varieties that dot the landscape throughout the summer.Napa Ridge in the Swan Range — Bear grass, Indian paintbrush and fireweed are three favorites that cover the mountainside.Peters Ridge in the Swan Range — Wildflowers seem to flow down the open slopes as you wind up to the ridge and access to Alpine Trail No. 7.WildlifeGoing into the wild often includes exciting — and potentially frightening — encounters with wildlife. I have been lucky enough to see many of our native species from the wee pika to the gigantic grizzly, and I’ve even spotted the elusive wolverine in Glacier Park three times. When we reported a wolverine sighting at Piegan Pass to a park ranger, he said, “You are lucky. You should buy a lottery ticket.” Glacier Park is one of the best places to view wildlife, with bighorn sheep and mountain goats often spotted at Logan Pass and along many of the alpine trails. We have seen a variety of other wildlife, including moose, elk, deer, mountain lions, eagles, and both black and grizzly bears, some from the road and others on the trail.Mountain goats are a common sight on Mount Aeneas in the Jewel Basin, and they’re habituated to people, so don’t be surprised if they show up for lunch. We have had many meals with goats looking over our shoulders, probably hopeful that someone might leave a crumb, but from my experience they keep a polite distance.Bear stories usually trump all. We have seen quite a few bears over the years, and most of the time we only see their rump as they’re making a hasty exit. But I have also had closer encounters. One was along Six-Mile trail when I was snapping photos of bear grass and was separated from my group. I felt a little uneasy by myself so I started singing “hi ho, hi ho” (you know, the one the seven dwarves in Snow White sing). Shortly afterward, I spotted my family waiting at a trail junction. When I reached the group, my husband pointed up the trail to where a little black bear was peering around a larch tree. The cub paused for a few more seconds before he scrambled up the tree, signaling that we should all hustle down the trail before mama bear showed up. In our future storytelling, he became the “peek-a-boo bear” who liked my singing (or at least the song.)Another incident that occurred in Glacier Park involved a much larger and more frightening grizzly. We were on the last leg of our hike above Two Medicine Lake, and, once again, I fell behind taking photos. I was framing a photo of wildflowers against a mountain peak when a large animal suddenly appeared in my viewfinder. I thought, perhaps wishfully, “oh, a dog,” though it wasn’t very logical, since dogs aren’t even allowed on park trails. But I quickly ascertained that it was a bear casually coming down the trail toward me. I know you aren’t supposed to turn your back or run, but I wasn’t about to wait for him to reach me. My instinct was to make a calm but brisk retreat down the trail, looking frequently over my shoulder until I caught sight of my family and motioned them ahead, silently mouthing, “Bear!” They caught sight of him, and we quickly moved down the trail to reach the boat dock where several hikers were waiting for the Two Medicine shuttle boat. They told us they had watched the bear follow us down the trail. We don’t know where the bear ended up, but we were sure happy to be headed home on a boat.Favorite Wildlife SpotsLogan Pass and along Going-to-the-Sun Road in Glacier Park — A wide variety of wildlife.Jewel Basin in the Swan Range — Deer, elk and mountain goats.Highway 83 — Famous for its deer population, we have also seen a variety of other wildlife on our way to a hiking destination, including elk, bears, coyotes, foxes, and mountain lions.Napa Point Trail — Plenty of wildlife, including grouse, deer, elk, mountain goats, wolverines, and bears.Wild Horse Island — This 2,164-acre island state park has walking trails that offer great opportunities to observe various wildlife, including bighorn sheep, mule deer, eagles, hawks, and wild horses.WaterCooling off. Sisters Kelsey and Risa share a little sibling rivalry and cold water at Rockwell Falls in Glacier Park.A hot day feels a lot hotter when you’re on a strenuous hike, so my favorite warm weather adventures are often along creeks, waterfalls or alpine lakes. A stream provides a refreshing face wash, while a lake offers a great way to cool off before the trip back down. I have swum in over a dozen alpine lakes, and I love when I can lure someone else to join me for a plunge into water that can barely melt an ice cube. My friend Mary grew up in California but is a farm girl and always game for fun, so she happily agreed to follow me into Turquoise Lake in the Mission Mountains, even with the north shoreline still draped in snow. She launched into the lake with aplomb and then popped up like a cork, first gasping and then laughing uncontrollably. She scrambled out of the water to a warm rock, still laughing.Another favorite moment occurred in the Two Medicine area of Glacier Park when my daughters had a water fight beneath Rockwell Falls on our way to Cobalt Lake. A photo captured the sparring, joyful camaraderie of the two sisters. Cold water and warm memories.Favorite LakesCold LakeMission Mountain WildernessCedar LakeMission Mountain WildernessDucharme LakeMission Mountain WildernessUpper Whitefish LakeWhitefish RangeHidden LakeGlacier ParkSummer SnowSnow lingers well into summer in high mountain country and never leaves in glacier country. On a trip to Mount Aeneas with visiting family members, while eating lunch, we watched a herd of mountain goats frolic in the snow, their white shaggy coats contrasted against deep blue skies. When we headed down the ridge to complete the loop past Picnic Lakes, a few members of the group followed my husband’s glissade down a snowfield, snow spraying and feet flying as they learned a new sport. For those not ready for a potential spill down the mountain, a snowball toss was plenty of excitement, while a niece built a hobbit-sized snowman.Snow slide. Glissading down a snowy ridge in the Swan Range contrasts a sunny summer day.Favorite Snowy High PlacesLogan PassGlacier ParkJewel BasinSwan RangeGlacier ViewGlacier View Ranger DistrictLunchThe lunch break is a highlight of our hiking routine — from a sandwich garnished with wild onions picked in a soggy meadow, to my trademark double chocolate brownie, to a handful of fragrant huckleberries picked along the trail. The “lunchroom” is usually pretty spectacular, too — on a perch above lakes and valleys with endless views, a warm rock alongside a gurgling creek or a glistening lake, or maybe on a smooth log that lost its bark long ago.Lunch provides a welcome break. Some may wander off to explore the area while others take a nap in the sun. My husband pulls out his maps, and where there is a lake, I go for a swim, followed by a sunbath to dry off before we head down the trail.I always feel wistful when it’s time to go home, reluctant to leave a special place, view and time. But reaching the end of the trail presents its own reward and satisfaction. When we get to the car, I like to yell, “I’m alive!” Then we peel off our boots and grab a cold drink from the cooler, followed by a high-spirited toast with family and friends who shared a day of hiking — and a whole lot more.* Read more of our best long-form journalism in Flathead Living. Pick up the summer edition for free on newsstands across the valley. Or check it out online at flatheadliving.com. Emaillast_img read more

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Chicago mayor Rahm Emanuel says ‘our souls are burdened’ over city’s latest deadly weekend

first_imgJoshua Lott/Getty Images(CHICAGO) — Chicago mayor Rahm Emanuel and the city’s police superintendent made an emotional plea for help in holding repeat gun offenders accountable after a deadly weekend in the Illinois city.“We have a heavy heart,” Emanuel said at a news conference Monday. “Our souls are burdened. What happened this weekend did not happen in every neighborhood of Chicago but it is unacceptable in every neighborhood of Chicago. We are a better city.”There were 12 people killed in shootings and at least 54 others injured this weekend, according to the latest police figures obtained by ABC station WLS.While shootings in many cities, including Chicago, tend to spike in the summer amid higher temperatures, Emanuel said that the temptation to place the blame there is misguided.“You can talk about the weather but the weather didn’t pull the trigger,” Emanuel said, making the same point about questions of jobs and unemployment.“There are too many guns on the street, too many people with criminal records on the street, and there is a shortage of values about what is acceptable,” he said.He said what needs to be changes is “the culture that condones rather than condemns.”“All of us know that this is not Chicago — what we saw — therefore all of us who love this city and call it home have a responsibility to heal our neighborhoods,” he said.Chicago Police Department superintendent Eddie Johnson echoed those ideas, noting that while police “have really good leads on quite a few” of the suspects, there have been no arrests in connection to the shootings, which were largely contained in four districts in the South and West sides of the city.“It is the same people who are pulling the triggers in some of these communities,” Johnson said at the press conference. “This isn’t a widespread issue among citizens of the city. This is a small subset of individuals who think they can play by their own rules because they continue to get a slap on the wrist when we arrest them.”“The city isn’t on fire,” Johnson said. “We just have to do what we have to do in those challenged areas to make it better.”“What we saw this weekend, it just it rips at everything that I believe in because I know, as a city and as a neighborhood… we can do better,” Johnson said.“We need everyone to come to the table with less talk and more action,” Johnson said.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Vermont Council on World Affairs to lead trip to China in March 2015

first_imgThe Vermont Council on World Affairs (VCWA) is pleased to announce that it will be leading an all-inclusive trip to China from March 22-30, 2015 in partnership with the Lake Champlain Regional Chamber of Commerce. “Experience China” made its first journey in 2010, when around one hundred travelers left a cold and dreary Vermont March for the allures of China. The trip, an “affordable, stress-free way of seeing China and all it has to offer,” was such a success that VCWA has decided to organize the trip again.  The nine-day trip begins in Beijing, where visitors will explore the 2008 Summer Olympic Games venues. A tour of the Ming Tombs introduces ancient Chinese history, while the Tian An Men Square is a reminder of the more recent 1989 conflict. Travelers will discover landmarks like the Forbidden City and the Temple of Heaven where emperors prayed for a fruitful harvest. The Suzhou segment introduces visitors to China’s renowned needlecraft through tours of the Suzhou Silk Factory and the National Embroidery Institute. A day in Hangzhou includes a morning boat ride on West Lake in Hangzhou and an afternoon at the Longjing Green Tea Plantation and Lingyin Temple, where a 64ft.-high camphor-wood carved Buddha resides. As the trip draws to a close, the group visits the Yu Garden as well as the Bund, a waterfront park historically known as the symbol of Shanghai.In the words of 2010 participants: “Our trip to China was incredible! The accommodations and food were spectacular and we thoroughly enjoyed our two travel guides. The camaraderie of the group was a bonus we didn’t expect, and we felt a guided tour of a place as different as China was the only way to see the country.  You get a lot of value for the money.”The all-inclusive trip includes all excursions, round-trip airfare, stays at 4- and 5-star hotels, three meals a day and English-speaking tour guides for only $2,499 (double occupancy). Additional side trips are available for $25-45 per person and business briefings may be included depending on interest. Pay by December 15, 2014, to guarantee your spot.Source: Burlington, VT October 27, 2014 — TVermont Council on World Affairs. To learn more, see the VCWA website (www.vermont.org/vcwa/china(link is external)). For more information, contact VCWA Executive Director Gail Stevenson at [email protected](link sends e-mail) or 861-2343 x. 3.last_img read more

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Senate Judiciary moves student loan repayment assistance bill

first_img Senate Judiciary moves student loan repayment assistance bill Endorsed by public defenders and state attorneys as a way to keep their assistants in public service jobs longer, a bill aimed at helping pay off law school debt passed unanimously out of the Senate Judiciary Committee February 3. SB 150, sponsored by Sen. Jeremy Ring, D-Margate, is similar to HB 45, sponsored by Dave Kerner, D-Palm Springs.Ring said the cost would be $5.9 million to create a student loan repayment assistance program to benefit lawyers who work as assistant state attorneys, assistant public defenders, assistant attorney generals, and assistant statewide prosecutors. The loans must have been for their law school education, not in default, and government-held.To qualify for the loan assistance, the attorney must work at least three years in one, or a combination, of the eligible positions. The bill authorizes up to $3,000 in loan payments annually for the benefit of eligible career attorneys with at least three and up to six years of employment.When an attorney reaches six years of employment, the amount authorized increases to $5,000. When the attorney completes 12 years of service, loan payments cease. Applicants must annually apply for loan repayment assistance. Total payments are capped at $44,000 per eligible career attorney. February 15, 2015 Regular Newscenter_img Senate Judiciary moves student loan repayment assistance billlast_img read more

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Michigan running backs blow by Minnesota defense

first_imgMichigan running backs blow by Minnesota defenseMinnesota allowed 371 rushing yards in the loss to Michigan.Ellen SchmidtDefensive lineman Nate Umlor and defensive back Adekunle Ayunde attempt to tackle Michigan quarterback Chris Evans on Saturday, Nov. 4, in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The Gophers lost to the Wolverines 33-10. Drew CoveNovember 6, 2017Jump to CommentsShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare via EmailPrintDue to inconsistencies in the passing game, the Wolverines have rotated in different quarterbacks throughout the season. So to beat Minnesota on Saturday, Michigan went to the ground.The Gophers lost to the Wolverines 33-10, leaving the Little Brown Jug trophy in Ann Arbor, Michigan until at least 2020, and the run defense didn’t give the Gophers enough room to retake the trophy Saturday. Minnesota allowed 371 rushing yards as the Wolverines averaged 10 yards per carry.“You have one missed tackle against this team, you’re off [of] the gate,” said head coach P.J. Fleck. “We had a lot of people miss a ton of tackles, and [we] had to make some adjustments.”The story for Minnesota was the run defense allowing yards and the unit’s difficulty making tackles was a big reason for that.“Certain players tackle better than certain other players,” Fleck said. “The runs kept spitting out because of a lot of missed tackles, that’s the big thing.”The first of the big rushes against Minnesota was the longest, a 77-yard touchdown from running back Karan Higdon.The second, a 60-yard rush by running back Chris Evans, found ways to break away from Minnesota’s defenders. Three Gophers defenders missed tackles on the play, and then the deficit was increased to 20-7. The third of the long runs against the Gophers, the fifth touchdown of the day for the Wolverines, was another run from Evans, this time for 67 yards. Three players on the defense missed tackles this time, including safety Duke McGhee. McGhee ran down Evans, but didn’t bring him down before getting into the end zone.Minnesota allowed 427 yards and five touchdowns, including four rushing touchdowns.Michigan was nine yards away from having two running backs each reach 200 yards in the game. Higdon had 200 yards and two touchdowns, while Evans had 191 yards and two touchdowns.“I would probably go back to execution,” said linebacker Blake Cashman. “I felt like maybe we were playing a little bit on our heels, and we didn’t hit them in the mouth first, and if we would have done that, who knows what would’ve happened.”Higdon’s 200 yards marked the most yards for a Michigan running back against Minnesota in a game since 1995.Minnesota got off to a similar start defensively as it did last week against Iowa. The Gophers allowed a first possession touchdown to the Wolverines, like they did against Iowa last week, putting themselves in a deficit early.“It’s not an easy place to come into and win,” Cashman said. “There’s no excuse not to get the job done.”last_img read more

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Study examines association of genetic variants with cognitive impairment

first_imgShare Of the 7,877 in the Estonian cohort, the researchers identified 56 carriers of recurrent large CNVs associated with known syndromes. Many of these individuals had phenotypic features similar to symptomatic individuals ascertained in previous clinical studies.A genome-wide evaluation of rare intermediate size CNVs (frequency ? 0.05 percent; ? 250 kb) identified 831 carriers (10.5 percent) in the tested population sample. This group of carriers had increased prevalence of intellectual disability and decreased education attainment. Eleven of 216 (5.1 percent) of carriers of a deletion of at least 250 kb and 5.9 percent of carriers of a duplication of at least l Mb had an intellectual disability compared with 1.7 percent in the Estonian cohort without detected CNVs.Of the deletion carriers, 33.5 percent did not graduate from high school while 39.1 percent of duplication carriers did not graduate high school compared to 25.3 percent in the Estonian population at large. These evidences for an association between rare intermediate size CNVs and lower educational attainment were further supported by analyses of cohorts including an intellectually high-functioning group of Estonians and 3 geographically distinct populations in the United Kingdom, the United States and Italy.“Replication of these findings in additional population groups is warranted given the potential implications of this observation for genomics research, clinical care, and public health.” LinkedIn Individually rare but collectively common intermediate-size copy number variations may be negatively associated with educational attainment, according to a study in the May 26 issue of JAMA. Copy number variations (CNVs) are regions of the genome that differ in the number of segments of DNA.The Database of Genomic Variants catalogs approximately 2.4 million DNA CNVs. Some of them have been previously implicated as causal of a wide variety of traits and conditions. According to background information in the article large (defined as larger than 500 kb), recurrent CNVs have been particularly associated with developmental delay and intellectual disability (characterized by limited intellectual functioning and impaired adaptive behavior in everyday life) in symptomatic individuals ascertained in clinical settings.Alexandre Reymond, Ph.D., and Katrin Männik, Ph.D., of the University of Lausanne, Switzerland, and colleagues used the population biobank of Estonia, which contains samples from 52,000 participants to explore the consequences of CNVs in a presumptively healthy population. General practitioners examined participants and filled out a questionnaire of health- and lifestyle-related questions, as well as reported diagnoses. For example, information was available regarding attained level of education for participants. Copy number variant analysis was conducted on a random sample of 7,877 individuals and genotype-phenotype associations with education and disease traits were evaluated. Phenotype is a characteristic of an individual that is the result of the interaction of the person’s genetic makeup (genotype) and his or her environment. Share on Facebookcenter_img Email Share on Twitter Pinterestlast_img read more

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Report: Teen weighing 55 lbs. hospitalized after 2 years in basement

first_img HELENA, Ala. (CBS)– Authorities say a 14-year-old boy weighing about 55 pounds is fighting for his life after spending much of two years locked in the basement of his Alabama home, Al.com reports.The website quotes Shelby County authorities as saying that the child is in critical condition at an undisclosed hospital. The report also says his adoptive parents, Richard and Cynthia Kelly, have been charged with aggravated child abuse. Bond for each is set at $1 million.The investigation began Sunday when Helena police were notified of the boy’s arrival at the hospital.The website reported the boy weighed only 55 pounds, but investigators would not confirm that information to CBS affiliate WIAT.According to arrest warrants, the couple is accused of denying food, nourishment and medical care to the boy, who was “subjected to forced isolation for extended periods of time.”The boy was severely malnourished, dehydrated, was experiencing shock and was “close to death” when he was admitted to the hospital, Helena Police Chief Pete Folmar told reporters. He remains “gravely ill,” Folmar said.Folmar said it’s the most disturbing case many of his investigators have seen in their careers.“You just struggle to wrap your head around it,” he said.Two young adults, 19 and 21, one of whom is an adoptive sibling, were also living in the home. Folmar said they are employed and there is “no harm” to them, and said they are not being charged in connection to the case.“The victim continues to get medical care and we at the Helena Police Department wish him a speedy recovery and our prayers are with him,” police said in a statement released on Facebook. Published: November 15, 2016 11:58 PM EST Report: Teen weighing 55 lbs. hospitalized after 2 years in basement SHARE Do you see a typo or an error? Let us know.last_img read more

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Leafs shutout Castlegar 3-0 behind 23-save performance of goalie Brett Soles

first_imgWhile most fans of the Nelson Leafs were enjoying a day at the turkey buffet table, the Green and White were making up of a hiccup Friday at home.Nelson rode the 23-save performance of Brett Soles to shutout the Castlegar Rebels 3-0 Sunday afternoon in Kootenay International Junior Hockey League action in the Sunflower City.The win gained some revenge for the Leafs after the Green and White dropped a 3-1 decision to the Rebels Friday in Nelson.A goal by Michael Crawford in the second period stood up as the winner as Nelson, 7-2-2-1, stretched its lead over Murdoch Division rivals Castlegar and Beaver Valley to four points.Nolan Percival, on the power play, and Aaron Brewer added some third-period insurance for the Leafs, winners of two straight games and four of their last six.Brewer, Nelson’s game star, led the Leafs in scoring with two points.Soles, outstanding between pipes, lowered his goal average to 1.96, good for second in the entire KIJHL behind Alex Kong of Summerland.Nelson, which invited players parents in for the weekend games, now takes to the road for a trip to the BC Interior. Friday, the Leafs meet 100 Mile House Wranglers before taking on Revelstoke Grizzlies Saturday and Sicamous Eagles Sunday.Next home game for Nelson is Saturday, October 25 against Golden Rockets at 7 p.m. in the NDCC Arena.Leafs outlast Braves at home SaturdaySaturday, Matt MacDonald and Rayce Miller each had two points as the Nelson Leafs edged Spokane Braves 3-1.The win lifted Nelson into sole possession of top spot in the Murdoch Division, two points in front of second place Castlegar and Beaver Valley.Castlegar defeated Revelstoke 4-2 while Beaver Valley lost to Kimberley 7-1.Coming off a loss the night before against Castlegar, in a game the Leafs scored only one goal, Nelson once again struggled to find the net against the Braves.Despite firing 17 shots at Spokane netminder Jon Manlow, all the Leafs could muster was a power play goal in the final minute by MacDonald.Nelson continued to hold the one-goal lead until Miller, named Home Star in the game, put the home side up by two with a third-period marker.Jake Toporowski cut the lead in half in the final minutes of the game on the power play.But Sam Weber secured the win with his second goal as a junior into an empty net goal.Nelson finished the game out shooting the Braves by a whopping 38-10 margin making a winner of Soles in the Leaf nets.last_img read more

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Connacht Homecoming – The Fans

first_img Galway Bay FM Sport Connacht Homecoming – The Fans Connacht Homecoming – The Fans The Fans at the Sportsground gave their thoughts to Norma Burke Back 15 seconds Connacht Homecoming – The Fans Galway Bay FM Sport The Connacht rugby team were given a heroes’ welcome in Galway city centre on Sunday following their victory in the Pro 12 tournament. Forward 60 seconds Galway Bay FM Sport Back 15 seconds Currently Playing 更多 Forward 60 seconds The province won the European Pro12 final with historic 20-10 victory over Leinster in Saturday’s decider at Murrayfield in Scotland. Audio Playerhttps://s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/sports.podcast/GBFM+RUGBY+VOX.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.print WhatsApp Facebook Twitter Emaillast_img read more

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Galway GAA Fixtures

first_imgWed 29 Mar Junior Hurling League Group 2Sarsfields V Pádraig Pearses 11:00, Ref: Peter MurphyCappataggle V Killimordaly 11:00, Ref: Gerry Donoghue Minor B2 Football League – NorthCaltra V Menlough 18:45, Ref: Sean Lyons Toddie Byrne Cup – Group CVenue: Clarinbridge, Turloughmore V Clarinbridge 12:00, Ref: Ronan StankardVenue: Clarinbridge, Clarinbridge V Athenry 13:00, Ref: Ronan StankardVenue: Clarinbridge, Turloughmore V Michael Cusacks 14:00, Ref: Ronan Stankard Toddie Byrne Shield – Group BPortumna V Mountbellew/Moylough 18:30, Ref: Vincent BurkeAhascragh/Fohenagh V Mícheál Breathnach 18:30, Ref: David Staunton Justin Cheevers Cup – Group CVenue: Ballyloughnane Cois Fharraige V Liam Mellows 12:00, Ref: John KeaneVenue: Ballyloughnane, Liam Mellows V Meelick-Eyrecourt 13:00, Ref: John KeaneVenue: Ballyloughnane Cois Fharraige V Gort 14:00, Ref: John Keane Minor A Football League – NorthMountbellew/Moylough V Claregalway 18:45, Ref: Gerry DalyKilkerrin-Clonberne-Williamstown V Annaghdown 18:45, Ref: Padraic KellyGlenamaddy V Monivea-Abbey 18:45, Ref: Pj Rabbitte U14 A Hurling ChampionshipSarsfields V Kilnadeema-Leitrim 18:30, Ref: Gordon Duane Minor A Football League -WestSalthill-Knocknacarra V Barna 18:30, Ref: Ger CahillMoycullen V Oughterard 18:30, Ref: Tommy Faherty (S) John Dunne Cup – Group 6Dunmore MacHales V Caltra 20:30, Ref: Noel Dempsey Junior Hurling League Group 4Craughwell V Oranmore-Maree 11:00, Ref: John Mc DonaghArdrahan V Ballinderreen 11:00, Ref: Kevin Egan Minor B1 Football League -WestKillanin V Naomh Anna, Leitir Móir 18:30, Ref: Frank KinneenSt Michael’s V St. James 18:30, Ref: Alan Carr U16 Football Division 1 NorthLoughrea V Caherlistrane 19:00, Ref: Kevin EganCorofin V Monivea-Abbey 19:00, Ref: Austin O ConnellGlenamaddy/Glinsk V Dunmore MacHales 19:00, Ref: Pj. RabbitteSt. Gabriels V Ballinasloe 19:00, Ref: Martin Gavin Toddie Byrne Cup – Group AKinvara V Loughrea 18:30, Ref: Pakie MuldoonKilnadeema-Leitrim V Moycullen 18:30, Ref: Peter Murphy Oranmore-Maree V Barna 19:00, Ref: Paddy Ó Gríofa John Dunne Cup (Qtr Final),Tuam Stars V Killererin 20:00, Ref: Austin O ConnellJohn Dunne Cup – Group 2Killanin V Salthill-Knocknacarra 18:45, Ref: Muiris Mac Gearailt Junior Hurling League Group 1Meelick-Eyrecourt V Killimor 11:00, Ref: Peter CampbellPortumna V Mullagh 11:00, Ref: John Rosney Justin Cheevers Cup – Group DVenue: Woodford, Rahoon-Newcastle V Salthill-Knocknacarra 12:00, Ref: Pakie MuldoonVenue: Woodford, Tommy Larkins V Salthill-Knocknacarra 13:00, Ref: Pakie MuldoonVenue: Woodford, Ardrahan V Rahoon-Newcastle 14:00, Ref: Pakie Muldoon Justin Cheevers Cup – Group DArdrahan V Tommy Larkins 18:30, Ref: Kevin Egan Justin Cheevers Cup – Group APádraig Pearses V Kilconieron 18:30, Ref: Seamus GoldrickMullagh/Kiltormer V St Thomas 18:30, Ref: Vincent Earls Minor B1 Football League – NorthBallinasloe V Dunmore MacHales 18:45, Ref: Martin FlahertyCaherlistrane V St Brendan’s 18:45, Ref: TBC Toddie Byrne Cup – Group BSarsfields V Killimordaly 18:30, Ref: Christopher BrowneCarnmore V Cappataggle 18:30, Ref: Adrian Mooney Tue 04 Apr U16 Football Division 3Milltown V Killererin 19:00, Ref: TBCKilkerrin-Clonberne V Menlough 19:00, Ref: TBCAn Fhairche – Clonbur V Cortoon Shamrocks 19:00, Ref: TBC Minor B2 Football League – NorthSt Gabriel’s V Oranmore-Maree 18:45, Ref: Martin GavinHeadford V Milltown 18:45, Ref: Richard McNicholas Minor C Football League – NorthKilconly V Cortoon Shamrocks 18:45, Ref: Charlie Ward Justin Cheevers Cup – Group BBallinderreen V Abbeyknockmoy 18:30, Ref: Charlie WardCastlegar V Sylane 18:30, Ref: Paschal Sheehan Junior Hurling League Group 6Athenry V Abbeyknockmoy 11:00, Ref: Michael ConwayCarnmore V Turloughmore 11:00, Ref: Richard Mc Nicholas Minor A Hurling Championship – Group 1Venue: Ahascragh, Turloughmore V Ballygar 18:00, Ref: Christopher BrowneVenue: Loughrea, Liam Mellows V Kilnadeema-Leitrim 18:00, Ref: Derek Kelly Minor B1 Hurling Group 2Sarsfields V Abbeyknockmoy 18:00, Ref: Peter MurphySkehana-Mountbellew/Moylough V Oranmore-Maree 18:00, Ref: Richard Mc NicholasGort V Ahascragh/Fohenagh 18:00, Ref: Joe Larkin U14 Football Division 1 NorthMonivea-Abbey V Annaghdown19:00, Ref: Martin Collins Minor B2 Football League -WestCarna-Caiseal/Na Piarsaigh V Clifden 18:30, Ref: Mairtín O Curraoin (coilím) U16 Football Division 2 WestAn Cheathrú Rua V Clarinbridge 19:00, Ref: Brendan KinneavyMícheál Breathnach V St Michael’s 19:00, Ref: Máirtín Ó GríofaClifden V Naomh Anna, Leitir Móir 19:00, Ref: Noel GorhamOughterard V An Spidéal 19:00, Ref: Noel Cummins Justin Cheevers Cup – Group BVenue: Ballinderreen, Sylane V Ballinderreen 10:30, Ref: Tommy HanlonVenue: Ballinderreen, Abbeyknockmoy V Castlegar 11:20, Ref: Shane HynesVenue: Ballinderreen, Ballinderreen V Castlegar 12:10, Ref: Tommy HanlonVenue: Ballinderreen, Sylane V Abbeyknockmoy 13:00, Ref: Shane Hynes Minor B1 Football League – NorthSt Brendan’s V Athenry 18:45, Ref: Martin FlahertyLoughrea V Ballinasloe 18:45, Ref: Paul Quinn Toddie Byrne Cup – Group DCraughwell V Ballinasloe 18:30, Ref: John RosneyOranmore-Maree V Tynagh/Abbey-Duniry 18:30, Ref: Michael Connolly Mon 03 Apr U16 A Hurling ChampionshipAthenry V Kinvara 18:45, Ref: Richard Mc Nicholas Toddie Byrne Shield – Group BVenue: Portumna, Mícheál Breathnach V Portumna 10:30, Ref: Brian KeonVenue: Portumna, Mountbellew/Moylough V Ahascragh/Fohenagh 11:20, Ref: Shane CurleyVenue: Portumna, Portumna V Ahascragh/Fohenagh 12:10, Ref: Brian KeonVenue: Portumna, Mícheál Breathnach V Mountbellew/Moylough 13:00, Ref: Shane Curley Toddie Byrne Cup – Group CClarinbridge V Michael Cusacks 18:30, Ref: John Mc DonaghAthenry V Turloughmore 18:30, Ref: Shane Hynes Minor B1 Hurling Group 1Sylane V Cois Fharraige 18:00, Ref: Adrian MooneyTommy Larkins V Ballinderreen 18:00, Ref: John Rosney Minor B Hurling Championship – Group 1Ardrahan V Craughwell 18:00, Ref: Paschal SheehanSt Thomas V Mullagh/Kiltormer 18:00, Ref: Michael ConwayKillimordaly V Michael Cusacks 18:00, Ref: Leonard Fay Minor A Hurling Championship – Group 2Venue: Ballinderreen, Clarinbridge V Kilconieron 18:00, Ref: John Mc DonaghVenue: Killimor, Meelick-Eyrecourt V Tynagh/Abbey-Duniry 18:00, Ref: Shane Hynes Justin Cheevers Cup – Group CGort V Meelick-Eyrecourt 18:30, Ref: Liam Gordon Minor B Hurling Championship – Group 2Cappataggle V Loughrea 18:00, Ref: Gerry DonoghuePortumna V Killimor 18:00, Ref: Peter CampbellPádraig Pearses V Moycullen 18:00, Ref: James Lundon U16 Football Division 3Milltown V Killererin 19:00, Ref: Charlie WardKilkerrin-Clonberne V Menlough 19:00, Ref: TBCAn Fhairche – Clonbur V Cortoon Shamrocks 19:00, Ref: Peter Bane John Dunne Cup – Group 1Cárna-Caiseal V An Cheathrú Rua 18:30, Ref: Brendan Kinneavy Minor C Hurling Championship – Group 1Salthill-Knocknacarra V Mícheál Breathnach 18:00, Ref: Pat McGrathRahoon-Newcastle V Ballinasloe 18:00, Ref: Murt Ó Cualáin Sun 02 Apr Division 5 (West)An Cheathrú Rua V Moycullen 11:30, Ref: Mairtín O Curraoin (coilím)Naomh Anna, Leitir Móir V Killanin 11:30, Ref: Pádraig Mac Donncha Division 5 (West)Mícheál Breathnach V Na Piarsaigh 19:00, Ref: Frank Kinneen U16 Football Division 2 NorthTuam Stars V Athenry 19:00, Ref: Austin O ConnellMountbellew/Moylough V Headford 19:00, Ref: John CahillCaltra V St Brendan’s 19:00, Ref: Mike TarpeyKinvara V Kilconly 19:00, Ref: Brian Keon Toddie Byrne Shield – Group AKillimor V Annaghdown 18:30, Ref: Michael MeliaSkehana V Tuam 18:30, Ref: Mike Tarpey Junior Hurling League Group 3Tynagh/Abbey-Duniry V Loughrea 11:00, Ref: Liam Gordon Toddie Byrne Cup – Group DVenue: Craughwell, Tynagh/Abbey-Duniry V Craughwell 10:30, Ref: James LundonVenue: Craughwell, Ballinasloe V Oranmore-Maree 11:20, Ref: Leonard FayVenue: Craughwell, Craughwell V Oranmore-Maree 12:10, Ref: James LundonVenue: Craughwell, Tynagh/Abbey-Duniry V Ballinasloe 13:00, Ref: Leonard Fay Minor A Football League – NorthMonivea-Abbey V Corofin 18:45, Ref: Gerry GuinanClaregalway V Kilkerrin-Clonberne-Williamstown 18:45, Ref: Austin O ConnellAnnaghdown V Glenamaddy 18:45, Ref: Gerry Daly Minor B1 Football League – NorthAthenry V Loughrea 18:45, Ref: Pat Hansberry Junior Hurling League Group 7Annaghdown V Liam Mellows 11:00, Ref: Adrian MooneyRahoon-Newcastle V Moycullen 16:00, Ref: Paul Fahy Toddie Byrne Cup – Group CMichael Cusacks V Athenry 18:30, Ref: Richard Mc Nicholas Toddie Byrne Cup – Group BVenue: Bullaun, Cappataggle V Sarsfields 10:30, Ref: Gordon DuaneVenue: Bullaun, Killimordaly V Carnmore 11:20, Ref: Seamus MoranVenue: Bullaun, Sarsfields V Carnmore 12:10, Ref: Gordon DuaneVenue: Bullaun, Cappataggle V Killimordaly 13:00, Ref: Seamus Moran John Dunne Cup (Qtr Final),St. James V Corofin 19:00, Ref: James Molloy Justin Cheevers Cup – Group DTommy Larkins V Rahoon-Newcastle 18:30, Ref: David EarlsSalthill-Knocknacarra V Ardrahan 18:30, Ref: Pat McGrath Minor A Football League -WestMoycullen V Salthill-Knocknacarra 19:00, Ref: Tommy Faherty (S) U16 Football Division 1 WestAnnaghdown V Barna 19:00, Ref: John DonovanSalthill-Knocknacarra V St. James 19:00, Ref: Kieran QuinnMoycullen V Killanin 19:00, Ref: Tommy Faherty (S) Division 6 (West)Oughterard V Barna 19:00, Ref: Frank WalshSt Michael’s V Fr Griffins/Éire Óg 19:00, Ref: Alan CarrCárna-Caiseal V An Spidéal 19:00, Ref: Brendan Kinneavy Toddie Byrne Shield – Group AVenue: Killimor, Tuam V Killimor 10:30, Ref: Gerry DonoghueVenue: Killimor, Annaghdown V Skehana 11:20, Ref: Peter CampbellVenue: Killimor, Killimor V Skehana 12:10, Ref: Gerry DonoghueVenue: Killimor, Tuam V Annaghdown 13:00, Ref: Peter Campbell Sat 01 Apr Toddie Byrne Cup – Group AVenue: Kinvara, Moycullen V Kinvara 10:30, Ref: Paschal SheehanVenue: Kinvara, Loughrea V Kilnadeema-Leitrim 11:20, Ref: Tom Mc NicholasVenue: Kinvara, Kinvara V Kilnadeema-Leitrim 12:10, Ref: Paschal SheehanVenue: Kinvara, Moycullen V Loughrea 13:00, Ref: Tom Mc Nicholas John Dunne Cup – Group 3Monivea-Abbey V Oranmore-Maree 18:45, Ref: Padraic Kelly Fri 31 Mar U14 Football Division 3Tuam Stars V Kilkerrin-Clonberne 19:00, Ref: Gerry Daly U14 Football Division 1 West Justin Cheevers Cup – Group CLiam Mellows V Gort 18:30, Ref: Ronan StankardMeelick-Eyrecourt V Cois Fharraige 18:30, Ref: David Cunningham Minor B2 Football League -WestAn Cheathrú Rua V An Fhairche – Clonbur 19:00, Ref: Noel Gorham Minor B2 Football League – NorthCaltra V Headford 18:45, Ref: Martin GavinMenlough V St Gabriel’s 18:45, Ref: Austin O ConnellOranmore-Maree V Milltown 18:45, Ref: Richard Mc Nicholas Wed 05 Apr U14 Football Division 3Menlough V Craughwell 19:00, Ref: Gerry Moore Junior Hurling League Group 5St Thomas V Kilbeacanty 11:00, Ref: Ronan StankardGort V Beagh 11:00, Ref: Fergal Bermingham U14 A Hurling ChampionshipCappataggle V Loughrea 18:45, Ref: Micheal Kelly U14 Football Division 4Milltown V Barna 19:00, Ref: Noel Finnegan John Dunne Cup – Group 2Barna V Killanin 19:00, Ref: Muiris Mac Gearailt Justin Cheevers Cup – Group AVenue: Ballymacward, St Thomas V Pádraig Pearses 10:30, Ref: Tomas LallyVenue: Ballymacward, Kilconieron V Mullagh/Kiltormer 11:20, Ref: Gerry HurleyVenue: Ballymacward, Pádraig Pearses V Mullagh/Kiltormer 12:10, Ref: Tomas LallyVenue: Ballymacward, St Thomas V Kilconieron 13:00, Ref: Gerry Hurley Division 7 (West)An Fhairche – Clonbur V Clifden 11:30, Ref: Mairtin O MaininMícheál Breathnach V Gaeil na Gaillimhe 11:30, Ref: Ger CahillBarna V Oileáin Árainn 11:30, Ref: Kieran Quinn Minor B1 Football League -WestAn Spidéal V Killanin 19:00, Ref: Kieran QuinnNaomh Anna, Leitir Móir V St Michael’s 19:00, Ref: Mairtín O Curraoin (coilím) Minor B2 Football League -WestMícheál Breathnach V An Fhairche – Clonbur 19:00, Ref: Mairtin O Maininprint WhatsApp Facebook 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