25th G&S fest

first_img[tag – entertainment]25th G&S fest[43]The 25th International Gilbert and Sullivan Festival will take place in Harrogate on 8-27 August.The festival organisers say it is their most ambitious programme to date, with performances from the entire Gilbert and Sullivan repertoire of comic operas. Groups are welcome. gsfestivals.org/group-bookingslast_img

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UK Holiday Group concern: Non-bonded operators not regulated

first_imgHarold Burke, Sales Director of the UK Holiday Group, has written an open letter to the trade associations and press to air concern that non-bonded tour operators are not being regulated.Shrewsbury office of Group Travel, which closed suddenly leaving customers out of pocketHis letter comes after the failure of Stourbridge-based Group Travel, which was not bonded and has left customers unsure of whether they will get their money back, “despite their brochures assuring their customers they were financially protected”.The letter says: “This is not just a case of whether this tour operator’s customers will get some recompense in the future. It is a more a question of how could a tour operator have possibly been allowed to trade making the reported, false, brochure claims, and without a financial bond in place.“As an industry we should all be deeply concerned about this situation, and ask ourselves who actually regulates independent operators and questions the integrity of their bonding and brochures?“Those of us who are members of recognised bodies, such as ABTA or BCH, know these bodies provide our customers with an independent means to question our financial status in this respect. But how undermining is it to our ‘book in confidence’ cause when tour operators are allowed to trade without a regulator ensuring they have adequate bonding in place?“I do hope this particular case is isolated, but it is one too many in my eyes and we need to question what can be done in the interest of the consumer to ensure this does not happen again.”Mr Burke also raised concern that “a significant number” of GTOs are still booking ‘package’ holidays for their groups, by making independent arrangements with accommodation and transport suppliers, without realising they legally need to be bonded to do so.The full text of the letter is as follows:Dear colleagues,A personal and open letter to the Association of Group Travel Organisers and the Coach Tourism Association and their members.The industry and group organisers need to be wary!As an industry I am proud of what we do, as responsible tour operators, to ensure we work within the guidelines of the European Package Travel Regulations, which are in the best interest of our customers, without whom none of us would be in business.As we are all aware this regulation applies to the sale of a package to a consumer and all group organisers should know that a package constitutes a booking that involves two or more travel elements, such as the flight and hotel, or the hotel and transport for example.The regulation requires operators like ourselves, selling the package to a consumer, to have guarantees in place that should they, or any of their suppliers cease to trade, the customer gets a full refund of monies paid or the holiday they purchased. It also covers repatriation if the customer is on holiday.Recent events, however, should act as an alarm bell to our industry and group organisers.The first concern is that there are still a significant number of group leaders who are booking a ‘package’ holiday for their members by making independent arrangements directly with the accommodation and the transport suppliers without being aware they are in breach of the EU Directive on what constitutes as ‘booking a package holiday’.In such circumstances their members’ money is also at risk. We continue to see the failure of independent coach operators and hotels which, in some instances, have resulted in groups losing any deposits or pre-payments they have made. The likelihood of having this money returned is minimal as there is little or no financial protection in place for them in cases where they book directly with a business that is not bonded.As an industry I believe it is essential that we continue to ensure that associations, group organisers and their members are made fully aware of the legal and financial risks they face when not booking a ‘fully bonded package holiday’.Of even greater concern to me, however, is the recent failure of a tour operator in the West Midlands. This operator appears to have been trading without a bond in place despite their brochures assuring their customers they were financially protected.I find this to be quite shocking and worrying having heard the stories from their customers, many of whom are pensioners, who have been told they may not get their money back.This is not just a case of whether this tour operator’s customers will get some recompense in the future. It is a more a question of how could a tour operator have possibly been allowed to trade making the reported, false brochure claims, and without a financial bond in place.As an industry we should all be deeply concerned about this situation and ask ourselves who actually regulates independent operators and questions the integrity of their bonding and brochures?Those of us who are members of recognised bodies, such as ABTA or BCH (Bonded Coach Holidays), know these bodies provide our customers with an independent means to question our financial status in this respect. But how undermining is it to our ‘book in confidence’ cause when tour operators are allowed to trade without a regulator ensuring they have adequate bonding in place?I do hope this particular case is isolated, but it is one too many in my eyes and we need to question what can be done in the interest of the consumer to ensure this does not happen again.In what appears to be the absence of any effective regulating control, other than those of us who are members of recognised bodies, I would urge group organisers to proceed with caution. They should be taking steps to ensure they obtain evidence that the companies they are working with are fully compliant in every aspect of the EC Directive on Package Holidays and never take this information on face value, as is the current case in question.I hope our industry trade bodies and representatives will share my concern and that together we can take steps to ensure those in higher authority take measures to cover any loop holes. This is essential so that our customers can travel in confidence knowing that it will not be possible for a tour operator to trade in the future without having an adequate bond in place.last_img read more

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Staying strong in times of adversity

first_imgVaried work has been the key to success for Hunters Executive Coaches as it looks to continue future-proofing its business, with a formidable father and daughter team behind itBased in Tullibody in the Central Lowlands of Scotland, Hunters Executive Coaches has never been known to put all its eggs in one basket.In 1983 the Hunter family went into business, running ice cream vans, fish and chip shops, pubs, and clubs. At the helm was John Hunter – a firefighter who began driving minibuses for a friend and decided to set up his own coach company in 1997.Director John Hunter who established the firm in 1997 with his grandson CallenFast forward 23 years and John continues to run the firm along with his daughter, Julie Jack, who joined the family business when she was 16 years old.“My family eventually gave up the other businesses, bought land and started focuses on building up the coaching business,” says Julie.“We had around five or six coaches and continued to expand over the years. We then bought another depot in Clackmannan and up until five years ago we were running two depots because we had increased the fleet.”Hunters todayHunters Coaches sold its Clackmannan site and now operates its 40-strong fleet from its purpose-built depot in Tullibody.The business is run from Hunters Coaches’ purpose-built depot in TullibodyAlong with 45 drivers and workshop and office staff, John and Julie are joined by Julie’s husband, Paul, who is the workshop manager, and Paul’s son, David, 23, who also works in the workshop and passed his PCV licence two years ago.The firm runs a mixed fleet of predominantly coaches with several minibuses, midibuses and service buses, which allows them to run a range of services.Says Julie: “We do a bit over everything. We do school contracts, private hires and coach trips. We also operate a park-and-ride service in Stirling and a local town centre contract, which we’ve operated for several years and they do very well.”Effects of COVID-19It’s this variety of work and “not putting all its eggs in one basket” that Julie attributes to being “fairly fortunate” during COVID-19.That’s not to say the firm hasn’t been affected.“Private hires have fizzled out,” explains Julie. “And, we have seen a slight decline in passengers on our town centre bus service, which we continued to run throughout lockdown. A lot of elderly passengers were, and still are, using the service to get to the supermarkets and pharmacies though.“The number of passengers on our park-and-ride service has also dropped, which is to be expected.”Feeling hopefulDespite this, Hunter Coaches remains positive about the future.Stirling Council has introduced a free fare scheme to get people using the park-and-ride service again – one that is said to continue until March next year.“It’s a great initiative to get people back on the buses and using the local amenities,” says Julie.The firm’s school contract work has also restarted, as schools in Scotland reopened on 11 August, and a few coach trips a week are back in the diary.“We are certain private hires will pick up again,” Julie says. “It will take time for people to feel reassured that it’s safe to travel again, but it will get better and we have all the safety measures in place to reassure passengers.”Investment in safety measuresHunters Coaches has spent tens of thousands of pounds putting measures in place to keep staff and passengers as safe as it possibly can.Julie explains: “I really feel we have gone above and beyond to make our depot and vehicles safe for our staff and customers. Anything we can do, we have done.”This includes temperature checks, social distancing and sanitising stations on-site, and everything from face masks for drivers and hand sanitiser as you board, to signage and sanitiser sprayers for surfaces on-board vehicles.Coach operator supportThe last six months have undoubtedly been a challenge for the coach industry. But Julie says the support operators have given each other has been “fantastic”.“Coach operators across the UK have really come together to help each other as much as they can,” she says.“Even in our local area, operators are trying to work together because we are all in the same situation. It’s all about trying to help each other as much as we can in this very difficult time.”Hunters Coaches also took part in the Honk for Hope protest in Edinburgh, with Julie involved behind the scenes helping to organise it.“We can’t believe the turnout we got in Edinburgh,” she says. “We were hoping for 100 coaches, but it ended up being much more than that. There are a lot of operators out there that want to be heard – and need to be heard.”Hunters Coaches is proud to have taken part in the Honk for Hope protest in EdinburghDefinitive answers neededHowever, when it comes to the government, Julie feels the support hasn’t been so forthcoming.She explains: “It’s disappointing that we can have a coach with 70 schoolchildren on it, but we’ve not been given a straight answer about how many people we can get on a coach trip. For coach operators that only operate tours, it’s definitely a real challenge.”Hunters Coaches is working around this by seating coach trip passengers from different households a minimum of 1-2m apart.“We work with our customers to figure out who can sit with who to make sure everyone is seated at a safe distance,” explains Julie.But, the firm – and other coach operators – can’t continue to run at half capacity.“If we don’t get more definitive answers from the government about coach holiday passengers, the prices are going to have to go up for our customers,” she adds.“We can’t afford to reduce the costs and then we risk losing them. This isn’t an option for us – we can’t afford to go backwards.”Keep moving forwardContinuing to move forward and adapting the business with changing demands has been pivotal to keeping the wheels turning at Hunters Coaches.Along with its coach and bus services, the firm operates MoTs and servicing for cars and light vehicles from its workshop.“It’s about adapting and making sure we have other revenue streams, which is why we’re building up the workshop while continuing to build up the coach side of the business,” explains Julie.This includes an ongoing fleet investment plan to keep its vehicles current. Hunters Coaches has sold three coaches via routeone’s online Trader and is having two new coaches – both Scania Irizar i6S – delivered in October.“We need to stay positive and we need to keep moving forward,” Julie adds.“There’s a lot of uncertainty in the industry and we want to reassure our staff and customers that we will still be here next year and beyond.”Coming back strongerWe’re more determined than ever to improve what we do and focus on where we want to’Like many, the pandemic has allowed Julie to spend more time with her family, which she says has been great, but has also strengthened her resolve to make the business even stronger with her father.“We’re more determined than ever to improve what we do and focus on where we want to be as a business,” she says. “We’ve really seen the loyalty of our staff during this time and it’s about making our business stronger for them, as well as our family and customers.“Next year is looking good with bookings already made for the summer and we’re in talks with tour operators about work for 2021.“So, it’s about keeping going, strengthening our business and making it safe for people to travel – and that’s what we’ll continue to do.”last_img read more

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Former Elkhart Sheriff’s Captain pleads guilty to false informing

first_img Facebook WhatsApp Former Elkhart Sheriff’s Captain pleads guilty to false informing By Brooklyne Beatty – September 25, 2019 0 517 (Photo supplied/ABC 57) A former Elkhart Sheriff’s Department Captain has pleaded guilty to false informing.James Bradberry was put on administrative leave in January, and his resignation was accepted in March, after he was accused of telling process servers to clock hours they didn’t actually work.Bradberry was charged with three counts of false informing on March 5.RELATED: Charges filed against former Elkhart Sheriff’s Captain James Bradberry Wednesday, Bradberry accepted a plea agreement and pleaded guilty to one count of false informing. The other two counts were dismissed.ABC 57 reports he was sentenced to one year with the year suspended, 30 hours of community service and ordered to pay a $100 fine in addition to court costs.Bradberry admitted in court that he left out information in statements related to the investigation. Google+ Google+ Previous articleWashington plunges into Trump impeachment investigationNext articleRodeway Inn Murder Suspect Arrested in Detroit Brooklyne Beatty TAGSElkhart Sheriff’s Departmentfalse informingformerguiltyJames Bradberrypleaded center_img IndianaLocalNews Facebook Twitter Pinterest Pinterest Twitter WhatsApplast_img read more

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Sports betting at Indiana casinos attracts $34M in first month

first_img Pinterest Twitter By Associated Press – October 10, 2019 1 417 In this June 27, 2019 photo, a gambler places a bet at the new sportsbook at Bally’s casino in Atlantic City, N.J. New Jersey surpassed Nevada in terms of sports betting volume in May, taking the national lead for the first time. (AP Photo/Wayne Parry) The Indiana Gaming Commission says the opening month of sports betting at Indiana casinos attracted $34.5 million in wagers.Data released Thursday by the commission showed football was the most popular sport with $20.7 million in bets, or 60% of the wagers. The (Northwest Indiana) Times reports football was followed by parlay wagers on the outcome of multiple games or sports (28), baseball (10%), and other sports (2%).Not all casinos started accepting sports wagers on the first day available for betting, so the amounts wagered no doubt will grow in coming months. Also, online sports betting began this month in Indiana through two companies with mobile sports wagering apps, and several more are set to go online soon.Indiana’s share of the sports betting proceeds in September was $813,000. Google+ Google+ Twitter IndianaLocalNews Facebookcenter_img Previous articleUPDATE: One arrested for St. Joseph, Michigan YMCA bomb threatNext articleNotre Dame fan arrested after allegedly injuring reserve officer Associated PressNews from the Associated Press and its network of reporters and publications. Sports betting at Indiana casinos attracts $34M in first month WhatsApp WhatsApp Facebook TAGSbettingcasinosIndianasports Pinterestlast_img read more

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Rome warns of threat to EU farming from free trade

first_imgCountering arguments that the damage to agriculture is perceived rather than real, the paper stresses that the exclusion of farming from the terms of such deals “can only be partial and temporary”, because of pressure from industrial interests and the need for pacts to be compatible with the GATT agreement.If things remain as they are today, Italy argues, any benefits accruing from closer trade ties with non-EU countries “willbe relatively limited and will be faroutweighed by the cost to our agriculture”.Ministers will be asked to consider whether free trade areas are an appropriate policy direction for the Union to pursue, or whether a less wide-ranging extension of existing cooperation would not be more appropriate. Italy believes there may be insufficient coordination between Commission departments dealing with external relations and development policies on the one hand, and Directorate-General VI, responsible for agriculture, on the other.The Mediterranean states also feel that DGVI’s internal policies fail to reflect concessions made to third countries sufficiently.But Italy’s contribution to the debate is unlikely to find much favour with the more ‘liberal’ northern member states, who point out that, as often as not, agricultural products are left out of the terms of such agreements. “Obviously there’s a need for coordination, but the effects have hardly been massive, so we need to get things in perspective,” said one official.Italy’s caretaker Farm Minister Walter Luchetti will stress that following the GATT agreement and the reform of the Common Agricultural Policy, EU farming is at “a delicate stage of transformation”.While his memorandum admits that the reform has had largely beneficial effects for Europe’s farmers, Luchetti doubts the wisdom of opening up markets too rapidly.Although political and commercial issues are accepted as valid grounds for policy decisions, “they cannot be considered sufficient to justify the establishment of a free trade area or a customs union”, Rome argues, adding that free trade areas do not automatically bring advantages. In a toughly-worded paper to be presented at an informal meeting of EU agriculture ministers in Otranto next week, the Italians ask whether the Union “can allow itself the luxury of sacrificing even parts of its agriculture on the altar of free trade, either at a regional or world level”.The meeting will provide southern member states with their best opportunity yet to bang the drum over their concern that the liberalisation of global trade threatens the existence of EU agriculture.Time and again, ministers from France, Spain, Italy and their southern neighbours have fought Commission initiatives to negotiate preferential trade agreements with countries as diverse as Morocco or South Africa.last_img read more

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Powerful tandem is en route for Dublin

first_imgThe Commission itself is expected to take offence at the Franco-German suggestion that it should share its right to initiate draft legislation with member states. Although the proposal is carefully restricted to some third pillar judicial and interior issues, and would be strictly limited to a specific transitional period, the Commission is known to be suspicious of any attempt to water down its exclusive right to table legislative proposals.Despite the potential powder kegs in the Franco-German initiative, Paris and Bonn share the Irish presidency’s view that issues of direct concern to citizens, rather than institutional or foreign policy matters, should be at the centre of summit talks.In his own pre-summit letter to fellow leaders, Bruton states: “The message from Dublin must be that the Union is serious about fighting drug trafficking and organised crime and, equally, is responsive to the demands of our citizens that we protect the most vulnerable in our society, especially children.”A taste of things to come p11 In contrast to the Irish presidency, which has tried consistently to avoid any direct confrontation in the Intergovernmental Conference, Paris and Bonn have deliberately mapped out parts of a clear route to reform the EU’s institutions and strengthen its internal and external security.Many of their ideas, particularly in the area of judicial and police cooperation, directly challenge the views of other member states.As a result, their joint initiative could sour the atmosphere of the Dublin summit this weekend(13-14 December), despite Irish Prime Minister John Bruton’s intention not to allow any options to be closed off at the meeting. The Franco-German tandem is pressing for more majority voting, an end to border controls, a timetable to transform Europol from an intelligence gathering centre into an effective police force, the harmonisation of drugs legislation and a cut in the number of Commissioners.French President Jacques Chirac and German Chancellor Helmut Kohl prepared the ground for this weekend’s talks in their traditional pre-summit joint letter to fellow Europeanleaders.Bonn and Paris have also consulted two of the three other largest Union members – Spain and Italy – on a more detailed 15-page memorandum.That the UK was not involved is hardly surprising, given its government’s firm opposition to ending border controls or giving up national vetoes in a range of policy areas.But the Netherlands, which takes over the EU presidency from Ireland at the end of this year, is also expected to object to Franco-German efforts to clamp down on its liberal approach towards soft drugs by harmonising anti-narcotics legislation throughout the Union.Many smaller member states are also likely to be alarmed by the view expressed in the Kohl/Chirac letter that, in the context of enlargement, “it is unthinkable to maintain the present composition” of the Commission.last_img read more

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Hislop’s EU hiccup

first_imgHave we got news for Ian Hislop, editor of Private Eye and regular on UK TV show Have I Got News For You. The news is, Ian – check your facts.In the latest show, Hislop went on a long anti-EU rant, in which he stated that Commission President Romano Prodi was part of the disgraced 1999 Commission which resigned en masse. For the record, the four survivors from 1999 are Neil Kinnock, Franz Fischler, Erkki Liikanen and Mario Monti.last_img

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Too late to change tactics?

first_imgGermany’s Chancellor Angela Merkel has said she wants to help the UK overcome its problems with the Union, so what should the EU do? Once Jean-Claude Juncker and Donald Tusk have settled into their new roles as presidents of the Commission and European Council, should they propose a process for launching negotiations? Or should they do and say nothing until after the British elections and deny Nigel Farage any opportunity to claim that a sell-out is underway.The judgment is a difficult one. Brussels must not lose sight of the strong indications from the polls that it could well be dealing with a Labour government determined to avoid the precipice of an in/out vote. It may, therefore be better to wait and see how far the political dynamics are changed next May. But how should the Commission and Council react if Cameron requests the start of exploratory talks before May in a move to calm his party’s fevered spirits and sideline relations with Europe as an election issue? In the short term, the politics are complicated. They could be much less so if Labour is voted in. It may be too late for Cameron to change his tactics of appeasing Tory anti-Europeans: his grass-roots are either panicking or shuffling over to UKIP. He may even feel the need to signal that he would recommend withdrawal if the 2017 in/out referendum ever happens. Increasingly, the present danger for Cameron is that Farage’s party will divide the Tory vote and usher in a Labour government or a Lib-Lab coalition. Hopes will cheerfully rise in Berlin, Paris and elsewhere that a change of government will make the UK an easier partner in negotiations on reforming the EU.And so it should. Labour leader Ed Miliband knows that Europe is nowhere near front of mind for the British voter – although it creeps into consciousness via widespread concern about levels of immigration. UKIP is harvesting many more protest votes than mandates for Brexit. At his party’s conference last week, Miliband repeated that as prime minister he would schedule an in/out referendum only if the UK was required to transfer more powers to the Union. Leaving the Union would be a disaster for Britain, he said, while his colleagues asserted that a Labour government would have much more important things to do than allow itself to be distracted by a referendum.Miliband has not defined what sort of expansion of EU powers he has in mind. Presumably, he is thinking of treaty changes, although he must be aware that ordinary EU legislation can have the same effect. He has not been able to avoid talking about EU reform, but he is as deliberately vague as Cameron on the changes he would be looking for. Miliband’s wish-list was aired in a speech last March and Cameron’s, two days later, in a newspaper article. At first reading, their priorities are remarkably similar.Though there are differences of emphasis and phrasing. In essence, Cameron and Miliband agree that the reform agenda should: 1. impose longer transitional controls before citizens of new member states can move freely around the EU; 2. enable member states to limit access for migrants to social security benefit entitlements; 3. allow national parliaments to work together to block EU legislation; 4. free Britain from the treaty commitment to “an ever-closer union”; 5. repatriate some EU powers; 6. promote free trade with the US and Asia and less red tape on business.Cameron also wants to end “unnecessary interference” in British affairs by the European institutions, as well as by the European Court of Human Rights, which is not such an institution.This broad and potentially significant measure of cross-party agreement on what the heads of agreement need to be should simplify the challenge facing EU partners in preparing and organising discussions with the UK. While his party would require Cameron to be tougher than Miliband in any eventual negotiations, Labour is anxious not to allow Europe to dominate its first 24 months in office and would probably take a less urgent, more gradual approach. “People feel ignored, taken for granted, overtaxed, over-regulated, ripped off and lied to.” Exaggerated but with political impact, these words raise a new banner in the United Kingdom Independence Party (UKIP) as it pursues an ambitious transition from a single-issue advocate of Brexit towards a mainstream role in British politics.Spoken by Mark Reckless, the second Conservative MP to defect to UKIP in a month, they confirm the emergence of UKIP leader Nigel Farage as a talented political strategist and prime minister David Cameron as an unusually clumsy political tactician. UKIP is playing the politics of rejection, not only of the European Union but also of Westminster-style politics. Cameron’s attempt to hold his Conservative Party together by feeding scraps to the virulent anti-European appetites of many of its members has failed to stop defections and a haemorrhage of votes to UKIP.UKIP’s national conference, at which Reckless’s defection was announced and celebrated, was the party’s first serious attempt to present a range of populist economic and social policies as solutions to the problems of “ordinary working people”. The arithmetic was vague but the message was clear: minimal immigration combined with tax cuts and welfare enhancements for low earners financed by cutting foreign aid and shutting down Britain’s contributions to the EU budget. Brexit is UKIP’s vision of a golden future for Britain. Today’s aspiration is capturing a rich harvest of votes in next May’s general election, which might even give the party a pivotal role in the new Parliament.last_img read more

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UK braces for first doctor strike in decades

first_imgA BMA video urges doctors how they can “safely picket.” It says picket lines will run from 8 a.m. until 12.30 p.m. to “persuade” other doctors to participate and to communicate with staff about the reasons for their action.Labour Party Leader Jeremy Corbyn | GettyCorbyn’s BBC interview comes just days after his party filed a complaint against the broadcaster for allegedly “orchestrating” the resignation of one of his shadow cabinet members live on air.The political activist would not say if he would join doctors on the picket line Tuesday though said he sent a letter of support.England goes it aloneIn an unprecedented move, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland have all taken a different stance than England over the contract negotiations.“Usually, it’s agreement on a four-nation basis,” said Tim Jays, spokesman for Scotland’s Health Minister Shona Robison. “But when it broke down, we said that we would not impose any agreement. We would then work on agreements on principles in contracts in Scotland.”Currently, there are no plans to change Scotland’s junior doctor contracts. Robison said previously, if that was the case, Scotland would welcome England’s junior doctors to work in hospitals over the border.Wales and Northern Ireland take similar positions. Neither plan to impose a contract on junior doctors unilaterally.Health care workers in Northern Ireland are also fighting with their government over pay.”I value the work of our junior doctors too much to threaten them with the enforcement of a new contract but they too have responsibilities,” Northern Ireland Health Minister Simon Hamilton, said in a statement emailed to POLITICO Monday.“Just as imposing a new contract is far from ideal, so too is maintaining a contract that is broadly regarded as being unsatisfactory,” he said in a statement.A spokesman for Mark Drakeford, the Wales health minister said: “We believe in proceeding through negotiation and partnership,” as opposed to imposing the contract. If negotiators fail to reach a deal, as many as 30,000 junior doctors are expected to go on strike Tuesday at 8 a.m. London time for 24 hours — the first of three planned actions in the coming weeks over proposed changes to their hours and pay. More senior doctors known as consultants, other health care workers and potentially military doctors are expected to fill the void.The mediator in the recent talks told POLITICO Monday there was no scheduled meeting with the involved parties before Tuesday’s strike.Prime Minister David Cameron, questioned a few hours later on the same radio program, urged the doctors to abandon what he said was a “damaging” planned strike.But a last-minute deal looks increasingly doubtful. The mediator in the recent talks told POLITICO Monday there was no scheduled meeting with the involved parties before Tuesday’s strike.The action will be the first for the nation’s doctors since November 1975. It comes years into a cost-cutting campaign under Prime Minister David Cameron that has met increasing resistance from health care workers.A second strike is scheduled for 48 hours from 8 a.m. on January 26, and a third will be a full walk-out from services, including emergency care, on February 10. LONDON — With hours to go before the first doctors’ strike in 40 years, Labour party leader Jeremy Corbyn warned that “fed up” physicians might look for work elsewhere.The Labour leader has largely avoided the escalating fight between the Conservative government and the nation’s so-called junior doctors, as he grappled with his own internal political party problems. But Corbyn, who rarely gives interviews, weighed in Monday, underlining that England was the only nation in the U.K. clashing with doctors over their contracts.“There is no doctors’ strike in Wales, there is no doctors’ strike in Scotland. They have reached sensible agreements with the junior doctors,” Corbyn told BBC Radio 4’s Today program. “How many are going to leave and go somewhere else because they are fed up with being treated by this government?” Meanwhile, health care workers in Northern Ireland are also fighting with their government over pay.Health Minister Hamilton on Monday announced a one percent pay increase, which health care unions called an “insult.” For most, it will be paid as a one-off amount, not added to the salary.This article was first published on POLITICO Pro.last_img read more

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