This year is the jubilee 10th DM Millennium jump in Zadar

first_imgThe tenth dm millennium jump will be held on Saturday, July 30, on the Zadar waterfront, the organizers announced at a press conference held in Zadar. Anyone wishing to take part in the Tenth Millennium Jump can register from 19pm to 23pm at the National Square in front of the Lodge or at Kalelarga in front of the dm. Applications began on Monday, July 25, and in the first four hours of applications, as many as 483 jumpers were accredited.The gathering of participants begins at 12:30 p.m., and the official part of the program will begin at 14 p.m. First they will jump to their feet, and then the participants will jump a double domino jump and a ball jump. Visitors and participants will celebrate the tenth anniversary of the dm millennium jump with a TBF concert and the largest risotto on the Adriatic”Everything is ready for the jubilee tenth millennium jump, and according to the latest forecasts, it seems that we have agreed on the weather. With the help of our partner dm, the millennium leap has become an indispensable part of Zadar’s tourist offer, and it also provides an opportunity to do something good for our fellow citizens. In addition to the guaranteed dancing “mood”, all jumpers will be invigorated by the largest seafood risotto on the Adriatic coasti”, said Neven Stojakovic, organizer and member of the Propel Society.As every year, part of the income from the registration fees paid by the jumpers will be donated to the Latica Kindergarten for the Swimming School for Children with Developmental Disabilities, the establishment of which was encouraged by the organizers of the dm millennium jump. This year’s millennium jump will also help the Social Self-Service in Zadar, to which it will donate a part of the income from registration fees for the purchase of basic groceries. “Plast year 2.800 people sent one of the most beautiful postcards from Zadar. Each jumper helped the Swimming School of the Latica Kindergarten by paying the registration fee. This year we will jump three times for the Latica Kindergarten, and we will be joined by their little ones who will show how, with our help, they have become excellent swimmers and jumpers. I invite all citizens to join us on July 30 on the Zadar waterfront and help us make the jubilee 10th millennium jump the biggest so far, said Hana Matić, regional manager of dm for Dalmatia.This year, the organizers expect even more participants, and we definitely recommend that you inform your guests about this event, whether you are a tourist worker at a hotel or a host at a family accommodation. The motive for coming is not the hotel or your apartment, but the quality and content of the tourist destination.last_img read more

Read More »

Minister Cappelli: In 2017, we expect EUR 800 million in investments in the tourism sector

first_imgAs part of this year’s 19th congress of the Croatian Hotel Employers’ Association (UPUHH), a panel was held on the current state of the season and discussed trends and future developments and challenges facing the Croatian tourism system.Minister of Tourism Gari Cappelli pointed out that the hotel segment is a major driver in tourism, the importance of cooperation between the public and private sectors and how much tourism contributes to the excellent results achieved this year.In the conversation among the panel participants, the importance of focusing on quality as a precondition for achieving higher revenues and further investments that are necessary for the sustainable growth of Croatian tourism was mentioned. It was also pointed out that one of the conditions for intensifying investments is resolving the Tourist Land Act and the Maritime Property Act. One of the topics also discussed at the panel was the challenge of a skilled workforce in places where tourism takes place, emphasizing that certain projects have been launched this year and that the focus in the coming years will be better connecting employers with the CES. and enabling retraining. Explaining the importance of investments, Minister Cappelli pointed out: “According to our data, around 800 million euros should be invested in the tourism sector in Croatia next year, ie more than 40 new hotels should be opened. As a ministry, we will place a stronger emphasis on some of the key issues for both investment and season extension, such as the activation of health and continental tourism.”.Photo: MintIn addition, Minister Cappelli stressed that the issue of tourist land and the activation of military property has already been resolved. “We will also amend the Sojourn Tax Act in order to use part of the earmarked funds more efficiently, and we are also talking to HBOR about the possibilities of lending to the tourism sector, which will enable a better quality tourist offer. Through the implementation of quality improvement measures, we will find it easier to break into the market and become even more recognizable”, Added Minister Cappelli. As a conclusion of the panel, it was stated that tourism changes every day and in order to maintain and increase competitiveness, it is necessary to plan for the long term.The round table entitled “Human Capital in the Croatian Hotel Industry” was attended by Minister Cappelli and Acting Director of the Croatian Employment Service (CES) Ante Lončar, Assistant Minister of Labor and Pensions Mario Bebić, President of the European Association of Hoteliers and Restaurateurs HOTREC Susanne Kraus-Winkler. Slovenian Minister of Economic Development and Technology Zdravko Počivalšek and Minister of Environment and Tourism in BiH Edita Đapo, and the discussion was moderated by Kristian Šustar, HUP Zagreb. The round table discussed the challenges related to the workforce in tourism in Croatia, but also in the surrounding countries.Seasonality is one of the key problems in the context of the workforce in Croatian tourism and how long-term solutions must be found, Cappelli points out and adds: “We are working on developing competence centers that we will finance with EU funds. The funds will be able to finance regional centers that will modernize vocational education for tourism and hospitality in accordance with the needs of the labor market and raise its quality in order to increase the employability of students and opportunities for further education. We will also focus on the marketing approach and actions to promote occupations in tourism”, Concluded Minister Cappelli.last_img read more

Read More »

Josip Zaher, Croatian Chamber of Commerce: We must provide a complete experience of Croatia as a safe and attractive destination for adventure tourism

first_imgToday, in the adventure park Cadmos Village in Komaj, certificates were awarded for attending training programs for holders and organizers of tourist facilities in nature, which was held as part of a joint cooperation between the Croatian Chamber of Commerce and the Croatian Mountain Rescue Service.”Adventure tourism in the world is one of the fastest growing segments, so it is important to offer the best and safest service and provide tourists with a complete experience of Croatia as a safe and attractive destination for adventure tourism.”, Said the Vice President of the Croatian Chamber of Commerce for Tourism, Trade and Finance Josip Zaher at the awarding of certificates of attendance for training programs for holders and organizers of tourist facilities in nature and further warned that current legislation does not define the obligation to certify adventure guides. terrains, therefore the expertise of the guide is essential.”HGSS pays great attention to education and prevention, ie prevention and avoidance of accidents, while HGK recognized the importance of such education, the main purpose of which is to create a tourist offer without consequences for the health of tourists.. ”Pointed out the head of the Croatian Mountain Rescue Service Vinko Prizmić.The Croatian Chamber of Commerce, in cooperation with the Croatian Mountain Rescue Service, has been holding workshops for training holders and organizers of outdoor tourist facilities since 2004. A total of 2004 participants completed the training program in Croatia from 2016 to 729, and this year’s training cycle, which took place in 7 cities, was attended by more than 200 participants.Related news:HGSS KEEPS VISITORS IN KOPAČKI RIT NATURE PARK AS WELLMINISTRY OF TOURISM SIGNED AGREEMENT ON FINANCING THE WORK OF HGSSlast_img read more

Read More »

Anorexia is an illness – not something we can simply blame on the media

first_imgShare on Facebook Email Not a lifestyle choiceIn western Europe, around 0.5% of adults are thought to be affected by anorexia nervosa. In around 10% of these cases, the sufferers are men. These figures, however, are likely to be an underestimation. It has the highest mortality rate of any psychiatric illness, mostly due to organ failure and suicide.Yet, the illness is often mistaken by many as a lifestyle choice with an external cause. Despite accounts of the disorder pre-dating the fashion industry, the view that anorexia is caused by comparing oneself to a catwalk model remains popular. Likewise, while pro-ana websites insist that anorexia is a commitment, not an illness, they are highly exclusive online communities, created by and for those already showing signs of the illness. The merely curious are not welcome.Instead, the link between media endorsement of extreme thinness and the development of anorexia is neither simple nor clear. Research mentioned by Jackson did find that women evaluated their bodies more negatively after viewing images of thin models. However, this effect was small and mostly determined by women’s pre-existing opinions of their figures – women who were already dissatisfied with their body were most affected.As this effect was only measured at one point in time, the effects of prolonged exposure are not known, but when more images were used there was a tendency for the effect to be smaller. Perhaps, as the authors suggested, these images activated, rather than cultivated, beauty ideals.Whether the effects of media exposure on body dissatisfaction leads to changes in eating behaviour is also unclear. Another study, also cited by Jackson, looked for a link between a person’s real-life media exposure and eating disorder symptoms. The results were fairly inconsistent, with some factors – such as body dissatisfaction – only corresponding to some types of media, and others – such as self-worth – showing no relationship.More importantly, the research showed correlation, not causation – it is just as plausible that women already unhappy with their bodies seek out thinness-promoting media more often. After all, if such a simple causal relationship did exist, the pervasiveness of these images in our culture raises the question of why the majority of our population is overweight, rather than underweight.Model bans but no supportMost researchers currently view the cultural value placed on thinness as a “background risk factor”. Meanwhile, several psychological and biological factors are implicated.High levels of perfectionism, a need for organisation and a focus on details are often observed in those with anorexia. Recent research suggests there is a lower reward response to food in the brain, even after recovery. Some of these factors seem to be influenced by genetic inheritance. Stressful experiences may then influence whether these existing factors then lead to developing the disorder. More than one risk factor will be necessary.So the legislation is likely to have little effect on the prevalence of anorexia in the general population, but it also offers no support to the models themselves. The law requires a medical certificate proving that a model has a BMI of at least 18. This is still underweight, according to the World Health Organisation. Regular weigh-ins have been only vaguely suggested and there’s been no mention of an obligation to offer support to a model who fails a weigh-in.While there is some debate over whether models are at a higher risk of developing eating disorders, this career certainly encourages unhealthy behaviour. Thinness of this degree has hugely damaging effects on the internal organs, bones and brain. It can cause obsessiveness and social withdrawal even in psychologically healthy people. France has already lost a high-profile model to anorexia – yet the new laws almost encourage agencies to wash their hands of models who fall ill.In the same way, while pro-ana content is undoubtedly harmful, the new laws punish those who are in need of help. This exclusively punitive approach is likely to drive these sites further undergound.If the measures are enforced – if spot checks continue, weigh-ins aren’t cheated and other countries are supportive – they may be a positive move. They may be a first step towards a culture that prioritises health over aesthetics – whether that means a dangerously small or unhealthily large body. Nonetheless, this will mostly benefit the worried well – those who, regrettably, are unhappy with their bodies, but are otherwise unlikely to develop anorexia nervosa. Claiming that these laws address one of the most treatment-resistant mental illnesses is far too optimistic.This article was co-written by Lexie Thorpe, an MSc in Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience at Durham UniversityBy Rachel Cole-Fletcher, Durham UniversityThis article was originally published on The Conversation.Read the original article. Share on Twitter LinkedIncenter_img France has joined Italy and Israel in passing laws banning the promotion of extreme thinness in the fashion industry. The health reforms, which include fining agencies employing models with a BMI under 18 and criminalising pro-anorexia web content, have now passed through the upper house of parliament.An analysis of the reforms by Sarah Jackson on The Conversation suggested that censoring images of ultra-thin models may ease their adverse effects on young women, such as concerns about body image and behaviours such as unhealthy eating.But while some have been hailing the legislation as a “crackdown on anorexia”, the laws may be unlikely to have any such effect. Pinterest Sharelast_img read more

Read More »

The key to reducing pain in surgery may already be in your hand

first_imgLinkedIn Pinterest Share on Twitter Imagine a hand-held electronic device – accessible, portable and nearly universal – that could reduce pain and discomfort for patients, and allow doctors the freedom to use less powerful and potentially risky medications to complement anesthesia.Now reach in your pocket, because chances are you already own one.According to new research from a team led by Communications and Information Science Professor Jeff Hancock and Cornell doctoral student Jamie Guillory (now at RTI International), the simple act of texting someone on a mobile phone during a minor surgical procedure done under local anesthetic can significantly reduce a patient’s demand for narcotic pain relief. Make that text buddy a stranger, and the odds a patient will ask for medications to take the edge off could be as little as one-sixth of those who go under the knife with empty hands. Emailcenter_img Share on Facebook Share “These findings suggest that the simple act of communicating with a companion or stranger provides an analgesic-sparing effect,” the authors write in the journal Pain Medicine. “The data also suggest that text-based communication with a stranger is more effective.”Building on research that has shown social support before and during medical procedures can reduce anxiety and perceptions of pain, Hancock and his team decided to test whether mobile phones that allow patients to send text messages or play games could bring that support benefit into settings where the company of family members or friends is not possible.Together with Hancock and Guillory, physicians Christopher Woodruff and Jeffrey Keilman from McGill University working at LaSalle Hospital in Montreal used an experiment to track four groups – patients receiving standard mobile phone-free perioperative treatment, those using a mobile phone to play the game Angry Birds, patients using a mobile phone to text with a close friend or family member, and others invited to text with a research assistant instructed to focus on “getting to know you” conversations. Neither the 98 patient volunteers who took part from January to March 2012, the research assistant texting nor nine of the 10 treating anesthesiologists (the lone exception being co-author Woodruff) were aware of the nature of the research, and treatment in all cases was left entirely to the discretion of the physicians.Still, when the research team analyzed the results, they found that patients receiving “standard therapy” – meaning those not using mobile phones during surgery – were almost twice as likely to receive supplemental pain relief as patients who played the game Angry Birds before and during the procedure. The same patients were more than four times as likely to receive additional analgesic as those texting a companion and – most notably – more than six times as likely to receive additional narcotic relief as patients who engaged in a texting conversation with a stranger.To verify that latter effect and explore its source, the team took the additional step of analyzing the language of the two groups allowed to text during their surgeries. Hancock and his team found that, while the text conversations with companions related more to biology, the body and negative emotions; the texts with a stranger included more words expressing positive emotions, with patients writing more often about self-affirming topics.The authors say this study provides the first evidence that texting offers this benefit beyond traditional treatment or even “distraction” methods such as playing a video game. The team called for new work to explore exactly what type of conversations work best, and how far this benefit can be developed to assist patients and doctors.“Our findings suggest that text messaging may be a more effective intervention that requires no specialized equipment or involvement from clinicians,” the authors write. “Even more importantly, text-based communication may allow for the analgesic-sparing benefits of social support to be introduced to other clinical settings where this type of support is not otherwise available.”last_img read more

Read More »

Einstein and Hitler, the hero and the villain of world history

first_imgPinterest Share on Twitter There is greater disparity of opinion about the villainsThe university students had to rate on a scale from 1 to 7 how positive and how negative the events and figures presented were. This study has produced a significant piece of data: regarding the negative events, there is clear consensus as to which the negative ones in world history are. But this consensus does not emerge when we are talking about historical figures. “There is greater disparity of opinion about the villains. The same figure may be very negatively rated in one country, or not very negatively or even very positively in another part of the world. That would be the case of Osama bin Laden, for example”.Another significant piece of data displayed by this research is that “when the surveyees were asked to respond spontaneously about who the most important figures in history were, names of political or military leaders were given because the things that occurred to the students were wars, conflicts and power struggles. But when the questions were closed ones and they sat down to think about them, the same students attached greater importance to scientists and other humanitarian figures. Likewise, when we asked about historical events, facts with a long time span such as the industrial revolution, the French revolution or the development of science were regarded as important as or more than wars”.Political, Machiavellian or pragmatic realistsA strange thing about the work is that it confirmed the tendency of a group of people in the sample analysed to evaluate ‘heroes’ positively but not to denigrate the ‘villains’. “They are those people defined as political, Machiavellian or pragmatic realists and when one considers that Hitler, Stalin or Saddam Hussein wielded power at some moment, these individuals don’t have to be rated negatively because they were successful in their struggle for power. This “Confucian” view emerges strongly in Asian countries,” says Prof Darío Páez.The cultural inheritance received since childhood and throughout our lives influences the view we have of History, according to this researcher. “Above all, this variability is shown in the ‘villains’ because there is a certain cultural consensus on the ‘heroes’ suggested in this study; most of them agree that Einstein and Mandela are heroes. For example, the view of Osama bin Laden is more positive in Arab culture, and that of George W. Bush is much more negative and, conversely, if one takes American culture into consideration”.So the results obtained in this study conducted across the world confirm that there is fairly clear consensus between the different cultures as to who the ‘heroes’ in world history are, but there is much greater discrepancy about who the ‘villains’ are. “The heroes are clearly scientists, discoverers and people who fought for liberties and progress. By contrast, the differentiation among the villains is much greater. Even if in almost all cultures the top villain, the worst rated, is Hitler, there is variability in some cultures in which he is evaluated less negatively, above all among the more recent villains like Saddam Hussein, Osama bin Laden or George W. Bush, the latter being clear proof of the loss of symbolic power of American society worldwide,” concluded Darío Páez. Email Sharecenter_img Share on Facebook What do Einstein, Mother Teresa, Gandhi, Martin Luther King Jr., Newton, Jesus, Mandela, Edison, Lincoln and the Buddha all have in common? They all make up the top 10 heroes in world history. As regards the villains, the first 10 positions are occupied by Adolf Hitler, Osama bin Laden, Saddam Hussein, George W. Bush, Stalin, Mao, Lenin, Genghis Khan, Saladin, the emperor Qin and Napoleon.This classification into heroes and villains is the result of a study carried out jointly across the world by various universities, including the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country. 6,902 university students voluntarily participated in this international research; their average age was 23 and they were drawn from 37 countries, such as Argentina, Australia, Pakistan, South Korea, USA, India, Tunisia, Italy, Japan. The work was based on the evaluation that these young adults have made of 40 figures and significant events in world history. The results of the evaluation have been published in the Plos One scientific journal and assert that historical figures help to create the base for building the transmission of moral lessons and that the facts constitute ways of acting.“This study is linked to a previous piece of work carried out in 30 countries and in which young adults were asked to name the most important figures and events in world history. After that, we got together a group of figures and events gathered by all cultures, although with a reduced presence of facts and personalities from Arab and African cultures, as there were fewer surveys from these cultural areas,” explained Darío Páez, a lecturer in the UPV/EHU’s Department of Social Psychology and Methodology of Behavioural Sciences of the Faculty of Psychology. LinkedInlast_img read more

Read More »

Study examines association of genetic variants with cognitive impairment

first_imgShare Of the 7,877 in the Estonian cohort, the researchers identified 56 carriers of recurrent large CNVs associated with known syndromes. Many of these individuals had phenotypic features similar to symptomatic individuals ascertained in previous clinical studies.A genome-wide evaluation of rare intermediate size CNVs (frequency ? 0.05 percent; ? 250 kb) identified 831 carriers (10.5 percent) in the tested population sample. This group of carriers had increased prevalence of intellectual disability and decreased education attainment. Eleven of 216 (5.1 percent) of carriers of a deletion of at least 250 kb and 5.9 percent of carriers of a duplication of at least l Mb had an intellectual disability compared with 1.7 percent in the Estonian cohort without detected CNVs.Of the deletion carriers, 33.5 percent did not graduate from high school while 39.1 percent of duplication carriers did not graduate high school compared to 25.3 percent in the Estonian population at large. These evidences for an association between rare intermediate size CNVs and lower educational attainment were further supported by analyses of cohorts including an intellectually high-functioning group of Estonians and 3 geographically distinct populations in the United Kingdom, the United States and Italy.“Replication of these findings in additional population groups is warranted given the potential implications of this observation for genomics research, clinical care, and public health.” LinkedIn Individually rare but collectively common intermediate-size copy number variations may be negatively associated with educational attainment, according to a study in the May 26 issue of JAMA. Copy number variations (CNVs) are regions of the genome that differ in the number of segments of DNA.The Database of Genomic Variants catalogs approximately 2.4 million DNA CNVs. Some of them have been previously implicated as causal of a wide variety of traits and conditions. According to background information in the article large (defined as larger than 500 kb), recurrent CNVs have been particularly associated with developmental delay and intellectual disability (characterized by limited intellectual functioning and impaired adaptive behavior in everyday life) in symptomatic individuals ascertained in clinical settings.Alexandre Reymond, Ph.D., and Katrin Männik, Ph.D., of the University of Lausanne, Switzerland, and colleagues used the population biobank of Estonia, which contains samples from 52,000 participants to explore the consequences of CNVs in a presumptively healthy population. General practitioners examined participants and filled out a questionnaire of health- and lifestyle-related questions, as well as reported diagnoses. For example, information was available regarding attained level of education for participants. Copy number variant analysis was conducted on a random sample of 7,877 individuals and genotype-phenotype associations with education and disease traits were evaluated. Phenotype is a characteristic of an individual that is the result of the interaction of the person’s genetic makeup (genotype) and his or her environment. Share on Facebookcenter_img Email Share on Twitter Pinterestlast_img read more

Read More »

Everyday activity more beneficial than occasional strenuous exercise for Parkinson’s disease

first_imgShare Share on Facebook Pinterest Email LinkedIncenter_img New University of Michigan research finds people with Parkinson’s disease may want to consider attempting to do the dishes, fold the laundry and take strolls around the neighborhood in their quest to control their symptoms.Parkinson’s patients often become sedentary because of motor symptoms such as gait, balance problems or falls, said study principal investigator Nicolaas Bohnen, M.D., Ph.D., director of the U-M Functional Neuroimaging, Cognitive and Mobility Laboratory.Once patients feel unstable on their feet, they may develop a fear of falling and then get scared to do any activity at all. Bohnen’s team investigated whether participation in exercise, like swimming or aerobics, could help alleviate the motor symptoms that made these patients want to stay sedentary in the first place. Share on Twitter “What we found was it’s not so much the exercise, but the routine activities from daily living that were protecting motor skills,” Bohnen said. “Sitting is bad for anybody, but it’s even worse for Parkinson’s patients.”The imaging study, now available online in Parkinsonism and Related Disorders, was conducted by U-M faculty who hold appointments in both radiology and neurology.Researchers investigated the relationship between the duration of both non-exercise and exercise physical activity and motor symptom severity for 48 Parkinson’s disease patients over a 4-week period. They performed PET brain imaging to measure dopamine levels and used a questionnaire to learn about how physically active the patients were, including both exercise and non-exercise activity. They found that non-exercise physical activity was linked to less severe motor symptoms.Although loss of dopamine is a key brain change for Parkinson’s patients, and has been thought to be the main reason why Parkinson’s patients become more sedentary, the researchers found non-exercise physical activity protected motor skills even among patients with differing levels of dopamine.“This may have a big impact for Parkinson’s patients,” said co-author Jonathan Snider, M.D., clinical lecturer of neurology at the University of Michigan. “Not only worsening Parkinsonism but also increasingly sedentary behavior may explain more severe motor symptoms in advanced Parkinson’s disease.”“I tell my patients to stand up, sit less, and move more,” said Bohnen, also professor of radiology and neurology at the University of Michigan, VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System staff physician and investigator in U-M’s Udall Center for Excellence in Parkinson’s Disease Research.last_img read more

Read More »

Language about climate change differs between proponents and skeptics

first_imgShare Share on Facebook Proponents of climate change tend to use more conservative, tentative language to report on the science behind it, while skeptics use more emotional and assertive language when reinterpreting scientific studies, says research from the University of Waterloo.Tentative language would include words such as “possible,” “probable” or “might.” The terms “alarmist” and “wrong” are examples of emotional language.Using a series of computational text analysis tools to measure the use of hedging or emotional words, Srdan Medimorec and Gordon Pennycook, both PhD candidates in the Department of Psychology at Waterloo, examined two recent reports of opposing groups. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) holds that climate change is unequivocal and that humans influence climate, while the Nongovernmental International Panel on Climate Change (NIPCC) is skeptical of the human impact on climate change. Email LinkedIncenter_img Pinterest Share on Twitter Although the IPCC clearly warns of the threat of climate change, the text analysis showed that their report used more cautious, less explicit language to present their claims. This finding coincides with work indicating that the IPCC has tended to provide overly conservative estimates of the impact of climate change in previous publications. By contrast, the NIPCC report reinterprets the scientific findings with more certain, aggressive language to advance the case that human-made climate change is a myth.“Given the scientific consensus that climate change represents a real threat, we might expect the IPCC report to exhibit a more assertive style, yet they don’t,” said Medimorec. “This may be because the charged political atmosphere has made climate scientists cautious in their choice of words.”The study found substantial differences between the IPCC and NIPCC reports despite the fact that they were both intended to be comprehensive assessments of climate science research and each have many authors.“The language style used by climate change skeptics suggests that the arguments put forth by these groups may be less credible in that they are relatively less focused upon the propagation of evidence and more intent on refuting the opposing perspective,” said Pennycook. “Although there are many factors that determine which words scientists decide to use, the results of our study are consistent with the idea that political context is an important factor for science communication.”Those who study science communication agree that the nuances in the language may reflect a difference in the function of the two groups.“When people communicate as advocates, they tend to use more certainty in their language than may be warranted,” said Vanessa Schweizer, a professor with the Department of Knowledge Integration in the Faculty of Environment at Waterloo, and who is also affiliated with the Interdisciplinary Centre on Climate Change. “In contrast, scientists are more tentative when presenting their findings because they don’t want to oversell what can be concluded from the science.”The two reports the researchers analyzed are “Working Group 1: The Physical Science Basis” by the IPCC and “Climate Change Reconsidered II: Physical Science” by the NIPCC. The Waterloo researchers did not evaluate the accuracy of the reports, which are both available online. The study appears in the peer-reviewed journal Climatic Change.last_img read more

Read More »

Light therapy effective for depression, study finds

first_imgLinkedIn Share New research finds that light therapy can treat non-seasonal depression and improve the overall wellbeing of people suffering from the disease.“These results are very exciting because light therapy is inexpensive, easy to access and use, and comes with few side effects,” said Dr. Raymond Lam, a UBC professor and psychiatrist at the Djavad Mowafaghian Centre for Brain Health, a partnership between UBC and Vancouver Coastal Health. “Patients can easily use light therapy along with other treatments such as antidepressants and psychotherapy.”The research, published today in JAMA Psychiatry, is the first placebo-controlled trial that shows that light therapy is an effective treatment for depression that is not brought on by seasonal affective disorder. Pinterest Share on Facebookcenter_img Lam and his colleagues followed 122 patients and evaluated whether light therapy improved the mood of patients when it was used both with and without the commonly prescribed antidepressant fluoxetine. Light therapy involved 30 minutes of exposure to a fluorescent light box soon after waking up every day for eight weeks. Some study participants were given placebo pills and placebo devices instead of the real therapies. The researchers found that light therapy helped many patients and provided the most benefit to those who were also taking antidepressants.Depression affects one in 20 people and is among the leading causes of disability worldwide.Depression can cause significant problems in family and personal relationships, work attendance and productivity, and overall quality of life. It is also associated with an increased risk of death.According to the researchers, medications are effective for treating depression but only work in about 60 per cent of cases.“More and more people are seeking help because there is less stigma about having depression,” said Lam. “It’s important to find new treatments because our current therapies don’t work for everyone. Our findings should help to improve the lives of people with depression.” Email Share on Twitterlast_img read more

Read More »