CBI and Institute of Directors call for small business focus in budget

first_imgMonday 10 February 2020 12:01 am “Long-overdue upgrades to broadband, rail and roads will be crucial, but the Government also needs to create the conditions for companies to take risks and innovate today to raise our game on productivity and sustainability.” CBI and Institute of Directors call for small business focus in budget whatsapp CBI director general Carolyn Fairbairn added: “This historic budget offers the chance to turn rising optimism into a surge in investment across the UK. The Institute of Directors (IOD) also submitted its budget wish list today, calling for an increase in investment for “scale-ups and start-ups”, the creation of tax incentives for growing small to medium enterprises, a delay of the touted digital services tax and investment into “regional business support hubs”. The CBI and Institute of Directors unveiled its budget submission to the Treasury today, urging Sajid Javid to prioritise small business investment. (Getty Images) The CBI and Institute of Directors unveiled its budget submission to the Treasury today, urging Sajid Javid to prioritise small business investment. (Getty Images) Also Read: CBI and Institute of Directors call for small business focus in budget “Backed by a pro-enterprise Budget for skills, infrastructure and innovation, business can help kickstart a new decade of UK growth and job creation.” whatsapp The CBI and Institute of Directors unveiled its budget submission to the Treasury today, urging Sajid Javid to prioritise small business investment. (Getty Images) Also Read: CBI and Institute of Directors call for small business focus in budget center_img Tej Parikh, chief economist at the IOD, said Javid’s budget had an opportunity to set out a long-term path for the British economy. The CBI unveiled its budget submission to the Treasury today, urging the government to review business rates and the apprenticeship levy, commit to building HS2 in full, increase R and D tax credits and increase skills investment across all the regions. “The Prime Minister has talked about ‘levelling up’ the regions,” he said. Stefan Boscia The advocacy group said “private sector investment that will lift productivity” should be chancellor Sajid Javid’s priority. Share Two of the UK’s leading business advocacy groups have urged the government to increase private sector investment and slash red tape in next month’s budget to help small businesses. Show Comments ▼last_img read more

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Sitkans gather to demand the relocation of controversial Baranov Statue

first_imgHistory | Local Government | SoutheastSitkans gather to demand the relocation of controversial Baranov StatueJune 25, 2020 by Katherine Rose and Erin McKinstry, KCAW Share:Alaska Native Sisterhood Grand President Paulette Moreno speaks to a crowd gathered around the Alexander Baranov statue in front of Sitka’s Harrigan Centennial Hall on Tuesday. Protesters are asking the city to relocate and replace the monument. (Berett Wilber/KCAW)The question of what we choose to honor with statues and memorials in this country has resurfaced in recent months. All over Alaska, people have been arguing for the removal of statues of European colonists because they represent a painful history of colonization for Alaska’s Native communities. And this week, conversation over a controversial memorial reemerged in Sitka.Around 90 people gathered around a statue in front of Harrigan Centennial Hall on June 23, ahead of the city assembly meeting. The statue of Russian settler Alexander Baranov was donated to the city in 1989 and often captures the attention of tourists’ cameras.Over the years, people have damaged the statue. The current group of protesters is asking the city to relocate it to a less prominent spot and replace it with a more inclusive monument. Dionne Yeidikoo’aa Brady-Howard spoke about why at Tuesday’s gathering.“This monument is not about telling our history, it’s not about acknowledging it. It’s a monument, it’s a place of honor for someone who does not deserve our honor,” Brady-Howard said.A handful of police officers, city assembly members and counter protesters also stood in the mix. At one point, Alaska Native Sisterhood Grand President Paulette Moreno made a plea directly to Mayor Gary Paxton, who came forward to hear her comments.“Symbols can evoke great pride, unity, fairness and life. Symbols–just like words and actions and violence–can hurt in a profound way,” Moreno said.In response, Mayor Paxton said, “We’re all one community. We take care of each other, and we’ll sort this out.”The peaceful gathering ended with a song that translates roughly as “We Are Still Here.”Dionne Brady-Howard, whose Tlingit name is Yeidikoo’aa, drums and leads a song after speaking to the crowd about why she wants the city to relocate the statue of Alexander Baranov: “No, it is not about political correctness. It is about accuracy. The teaching of accurate history is the only thing that keeps us from repeating those mistakes.” (Berett Wilber/KCAW)The tension over the statue then moved indoors to the Sitka Assembly meeting. Doug Osborne presented a petition of around 900 signatures, and public comment followed.During persons to be heard, Nicholas Galanin was one of over a dozen residents who called for the removal or replacement of the monument.“Baranov is a historic figure who is responsible for murder, enslavement, rape and a perpetrator of genocide. This history is still felt by our Indigenous communities today. Indigenous women are statistically highest in missing and murdered cases across North America. Our languages have to be revitalized because they were violently taken from us,” Galanin said. “Use this opportunity to be on the just side of history.”Galanin also shared a section of an email Assembly Member Valorie Nelson sent to another community member earlier that day.“Valorie says ‘Maybe we should remove the totem poles and the war canoes,’ and then goes on to say ‘When is this going to end, if you don’t like our town there are other places that might make you happier,” he quoted.Galanin then called for Nelson to step down from her assembly seat. “I don’t think that she’s capable of serving the community with words like that,” he said.Under assembly rules, assembly members aren’t allowed to respond during persons to be heard. Once in a while, however,  a member will step away from the table and speak as a member of the public. Member Valorie Nelson used this opportunity to defend her comments and to take a policy argument and make it deeply personal.“I’ve been a community member for over 60 years. I was raped at 7 years old as a child by two Native community members. Never was it reported, never was anything done,” she said. “I hold no animosity towards what happened back then. I hold no animosity towards the Tribe. And I’m kind of tired of all the crap that’s going on.”Nelson said she found the debate over the Baranov statue to be divisive, and she supported placing a statue of civil rights activist Elizabeth Peratrovich at the Sawmill Creek roundabout.The question of the Baranov statue wasn’t on the assembly’s published agenda, which makes it difficult to estimate public support for keeping it in place. Nevertheless, word of the demonstration had reached members of the family who donated the sculpture to the community. Andrew, Roger Lloyd, and Brian Hames spoke on behalf of their grandparents, Lloyd and Barbara Hames, who commissioned the piece in the 1980s. The family has historically stayed silent on the statue, but Brian Hames said they agreed that the future of the statue was a public decision.“Our family is grieved to know that the statue offends or makes any members of our community feel uncomfortable in any way. We value and appreciate the rich diversity of Sitka’s people, and we feel that whether the statue stays in its current location or is moved elsewhere is not our decision to make,” he said. “The statue was a gift, and like any gift, whatever is ultimately done with it is up to the recipient, the city of Sitka.”The Hames brothers had one caveat: They asked that if the statue is removed, that it not be defaced or destroyed out of respect for the sculptor,  Joan Bugbee-Jackson. They hoped it might be  displayed in a museum where it could be treated as a work of art, and where the history of Alexander Baranov could be more accurately represented.Share this story:last_img read more

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Major Boost for JCF’s Breathalyzer Programme

first_imgAdvertisements RelatedMajor Boost for JCF’s Breathalyzer Programme RelatedMajor Boost for JCF’s Breathalyzer Programme RelatedMajor Boost for JCF’s Breathalyzer Programmecenter_img FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail The Jamaica Constabulary Force’s (JCF) breathalyzer programme has received a major boost, with the commissioning into service of 20 new state-of-the-art breathalyzer equipment by Minister of National Security, Derrick Smith on (Dec. 20).The equipment, purchased at a cost of $US 230,000.00 will be handed over to some 17 police divisions in Kingston and St. Andrew, St. Catherine, Manchester, Westmoreland, Hanover, Montego Bay, St. Ann, Portland and St. Thomas. Speaking at the commissioning ceremony at the JCF’s Traffic Division headquarters on Lower Elletson Road in Kingston, Minister Smith said the new machines will help law enforcement officers to carry out their duties more effectively and reduce the incidences of drunk driving on the nation’s roadways.He pledged to ensure that more machines are purchased in the new financial year.In the meantime, Minister Smith said that while there has been some level of reduction in the number of motor vehicle accidents, there is need for further reduction. “We are heading in the right direction. Things are improving although it is not at the level we are comfortable with and it is not at the level we are satisfied with. We are still having some 13,000 persons affected annually by motor vehicle accidents, which would average out at about 35 a day,” he stated.The Minister cited the failure of passengers to wear seat belts, speeding and the overloading of vehicles, as major causes of road accidents. As such, Mr. Smith appealed to the members of the JCF to be vigilant in enforcing safety regulations.He further urged drivers, especially operators of public passenger vehicles, not to overload their cars. “What you are doing is wrong. You are endangering your life and the lives of innocent persons. What happens when we have these crashes on our streets is that we lose scores of lives out of recklessness and carelessness,” the Minister pointed out.Commenting on the impact of road fatalities on the economy, the Minister pointed out that road accidents create a severe strain on the health sector, with costs estimated at some $2 billion. This sum, he pointed out, could be used in other critical areas. Head of the Traffic Division, Senior Superintendent of Police (SSP) Elan Powell, said the new breathalyzer machines are a significant improvement over the previous equipment.“One of the problems with those machines is they were not well suited for the climatic conditions.there has been advancement in technology so we are now getting the most modern equipment. They are pretty useful,” he stated.He noted further that the new machines are portable. “You can put in on the backseat of a car. and conduct your tests, the others you had to depend on having an office. There is no such requirement here.”The JCF’s breathalyzer programme, which was instituted a few years ago, has been almost inactive due to the need for proper equipment. Only 20 of 200 instruments acquired by the JCF at the inception of the programme were functional and the majority of the non-functional instruments have been at the Bureau of Standards for a considerable period and the Bureau has not been able to restore them to proper working order. Major Boost for JCF’s Breathalyzer Programme UncategorizedDecember 20, 2007last_img read more

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How It Works: Hydrogen fuel cells

first_imgHow It Works: What type of gasoline is right for your car?Once the electrons and ions make their way to the cathode, they combine with the oxygen to create water, which is channelled away. Along with heat, water is the only byproduct of the process, and the only emission that comes out of the tailpipe is water vapour.An average fuel cell only creates about one volt of electricity, and so multiple ones are packed together to make a fuel cell stack capable of providing enough power for a vehicle. The stack includes modules that control the flow of hydrogen and water, along with the coolant needed to regulate the temperature in the fuel cells, but there are no moving parts.Rather than a gas tank, a fuel cell vehicle has a hydrogen tank. Refuelling takes less than five minutes — comparable to filling a conventional gasoline vehicle — and while mileage depends on how you drive, Hyundai says its Tucson FCV gets more than 400 kilometres to a tank. But for those who don’t get subsidies, FCVs are not cheap to fill. According to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), hydrogen is currently $13 to $16 (US) per kilogram. Further research is underway to bring it down to less than $4 per kilogram by 2020.Toyota Mirai Trending Videos While hybrid and electric cars have become a common sight on our roads, there’s another alternative that’s much harder to spot: the hydrogen fuel cell vehicle (FCV).While several automakers are working on them, only a few have made it to the North American market. Hyundai’s Tucson FCV is available to lease in limited quantities in British Columbia, while Californians can drive Toyota’s Mirai, and will be getting the Honda Clarity later this year.The biggest issue is the chicken-and-egg situation of refuelling infrastructure. It’s tough to build hydrogen stations when there aren’t enough cars that need them, and people won’t buy the cars because there aren’t enough places to fill them up. But they’re still a fascinating technology, and have the potential to become as popular as electrics or hybrids, at the very least, once the fuel is widely available. How It Works: All-wheel and four-wheel drive A kilo of hydrogen has roughly the same energy density as a gallon of gasoline, but the DOE says it’ll take you almost twice as far, because a fuel cell is twice as efficient as a gas engine. Hydrogen can be burned in an internal combustion engine, a process BMW tested several years ago in its experimental Hydrogen 7 sedan, but it’s far more efficient when used in a fuel cell.The cars themselves aren’t cheap, either, primarily because their systems don’t have the benefit of volume production as gasoline engines do. The starting MSRP on a Toyota Mirai is $57,500 (US), almost $33,000 more than a base Prius.And while nothing more than water comes out the tailpipe, there’s still a question of how environmentally friendly the hydrogen itself is. It occurs naturally, but to obtain enough at reasonable cost, it has to be separated from other elements. There are several ways of doing this, but currently, most hydrogen is made from natural gas, which uses a fossil fuel and generates carbon dioxide. Some companies also make it from wood, in a process called charcoal gasification, which creates hydrogen and carbon monoxide.Of course, it can also be made by splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen, but right now, that process can be four times pricier than using natural gas. It also requires electricity, and in the United States, about 33 per cent of power generation uses coal. Along with hydrogen cars themselves, the process for making their fuel has to evolve as well. The Rolls-Royce Boat Tail may be the most expensive new car ever COMMENTSSHARE YOUR THOUGHTS Trending in Canada The Tucson FCEV gets refueled at Metro Vancouver’s only public hydrogen station, located at Powertech Labs in Surrey advertisementcenter_img See More Videos RELATED TAGSFeature StoryHow it worksNewsAutomotive ReviewsCars and Car DesignCulture and Lifestyle We encourage all readers to share their views on our articles using Facebook commenting Visit our FAQ page for more information. PlayThe Rolls-Royce Boat Tail may be the most expensive new car everPlay3 common new car problems (and how to prevent them) | Maintenance Advice | Driving.caPlayFinal 5 Minivan Contenders | Driving.caPlay2021 Volvo XC90 Recharge | Ministry of Interior Affairs | Driving.caPlayThe 2022 Ford F-150 Lightning is a new take on Canada’s fave truck | Driving.caPlayBuying a used Toyota Tundra? Check these 5 things first | Used Truck Advice | Driving.caPlayCanada’s most efficient trucks in 2021 | Driving.caPlay3 ways to make night driving safer and more comfortable | Advice | Driving.caPlayDriving into the Future: Sustainability and Innovation in tomorrow’s cars | Driving.ca virtual panelPlayThese spy shots get us an early glimpse of some future models | Driving.ca Many years ago, I asked an auto executive why his company, which was experimenting with several types of alternative fuels, was spreading itself over so many. “We don’t know what’s going to be the one, and we want to be ready when we find out,” was his reply. Whether hydrogen will be the fuel that takes us to the next level remains to be seen, but the fact that these vehicles are actually on the road means it’s at least a viable challenger. FCVs are electric vehicles, but unlike those that need to be plugged in, they generate their own power using on-board fuel cell stacks. Like electrics and hybrids, they contain storage batteries and use regenerative braking to capture the kinetic energy otherwise lost during deceleration, then store it as electricity. However, the storage battery is generally only used to provide extra power during starting or hard acceleration.A fuel cell consists of an anode and a cathode, separated by a thin membrane that looks like a piece of cellophane. Hydrogen from the vehicle’s tank is pumped into the anode side, while air, which contains the oxygen necessary to the process, is sent into the cathode side.The electricity is created through a chemical process. The hydrogen reacts with a catalyst at the anode, splitting into positively charged ions and negatively charged electrons. Only the positively charged ions can get through the membrane, and they pass through unimpeded to the cathode. But the electrons have to make their way over via an external circuit, creating an electrical current.RELATED ‹ Previous Next › Buy It! Princess Diana’s humble little 1981 Ford Escort is up for auction An engagement gift from Prince Charles, the car is being sold by a Princess Di “superfan”last_img read more

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Career And Disability Services Join Together For Nace/Chevron Award

first_img Published: June 15, 1997 Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail The offices of Disability Services and Career Services at the University of Colorado at Boulder were the first runners-up for the Unique Career Fair Concept Merits NACE/Chevron Award for their project entry titled “Career Program for Students with Disabilities.” The two offices produced the project together to introduce students with disabilities to various employers. For the past year the program has successfully helped students with disabilities acquire job skills and gain experience adapting in the workplace. They also receive a fixed payment funded by the university’s learning disabilities program and members of the administrative staff. Lynne Boyle, assistant director of career services, was awarded $250 for submitting the project idea. Others involved in planning include, Henry Claypool and Jayne MacArthur from Disability Services, and Michael Deragisch and Judith Moore from Career Services. “This program serves as a model because it can be easily duplicated on most university campuses that have a career services office and a knowledgeable disability professional,” Boyle said. The NACE/ Chevron award was initiated in 1983. The winner receives a check for 1,000 and a plaque. The winning entry was submitted by Russ Everhart, Johnson County Community College career coordinator, on innovative programming in career services.last_img read more

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April is Asian Pacific American Awareness Month at CU

first_img Published: April 11, 2017 April is Asian Pacific American Awareness Month at CU Boulder. Get to know the Asian American Pacific Islander (AAPI) community on the CU Boulder campus with a variety of events scheduled now through April 27.CollaborAsian, the Cultural Events Board and the Cultural Unity & Engagement (CUE) Center invite you to learn about the experiences of the AAPI community by attending a series of free educational and cultural events during the month of April.For more information on the events below or to RSVP, please visit the Facebook event page.Living in Vocal Empowerment [L.I.V.E.] featuring Blasian NarrativesSaturday, April 15, 5 p.m.Center for Community, JD Abrams Lounge (ENVD 134)Share your work, art and talents during this open mic session with Blasian Narratives, a multimedia docu-theater project that intimately explores the intersection and identities of mixed race black and Asian individuals through live performances and film. Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Passport to Asia (Hosted by Asian Unity)Sunday, April 23, 6 p.m.University Memorial Center, Glen Miller BallroomCome get a sample of various ethnic Asian foods while watching cultural performances by students and community members. CUE Center Chili PotWednesday, April 19, noonCenter for Community, Flatirons RoomThis will be one of the last Chili Pots with the CUE Center for the entire semester! Come as we discuss tropes and misrepresentation of AAPI in media with a focus on recent media like Ghost in the Shell and Great Wall.center_img People of Color PotluckMonday, April 24, 6:30 p.m.Rec Center, Ice Rink Overlook RoomMeet the members of the AAPI community and get involved with other student groups. Please bring a dish to share.  Femme a Femme featuring Sad Asian GirlsThursday, April 27, 4:30 p.m.University Memorial Center, rooms 415–17Sad Asian Girls generate dialogues on important, contemporary subjects for young Asian femmes to be exposed via documenting and personal experiences. Come with an open mind and leave with a meaningful piece.CollaborAsian is a student-led group that provides a space for the AAPI community to collaborate and celebrate their heritage as well as increase exposure on the CU Boulder campus.The Cultural Events Board facilitates opportunities for students that develop their understanding of culture, diversity and social awareness.The CUE Center provides facilitated educational experiences, resources and involvement opportunities to improve the campus climate for first-generation students, international students and students of color.Events are hosted in collaboration with the Arts and Sciences Student Government (ASSG), Asian Unity, Black Student Alliance, Japanese Student Association, Vietnamese Student Association, and Women and Gender Studies.Categories:Arts & CultureEvents & Exhibitslast_img read more

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Beat the summer heat with professional development opportunities beginning in June

first_imgPublished: May 12, 2021 Emotional IntelligenceDates: May 10 & 17 Time: 9:00 am -11:00 am, each day Virtual SessionEmotional Intelligence (EI) is the ability to recognize and understand emotions in yourself and others, and your ability to use this awareness to manage your behavior and relationships. EI has been shown to increase job performance, productivity, and personal excellence.Cost: There is no cost for this course. Register for Emotional Intelligence Crucial ConversationsDates: June 7, 9, 11, 14, 16, 18, 21 & 23 ​Time: 9:00 am -11:00 am each day Virtual SessionCrucial Conversations is a eight-session course that teaches skills for creating alignment and agreement by fostering open dialogue around high-stakes, emotional, or risky topics – at all levels of the organization.  By learning how to speak and be heard (and encouraging others to do the same), you’ll surface the best ideas, make the highest-quality decisions, and then act on your decisions with unity and commitment. Cost: $195 per personRegister to Attend Crucial Conversations Managers Academy, EMCE Blended VersionDates: June 8, 15, 22 & 29 Time: 9:00 am-11:00 am, each day (4 total per Blended Course) Virtual SessionThe Employee Management and Compliance Essentials course provides a comprehensive overview for managers and uspervisors of legal guidelines, campus policies, and CU-Boulder practices related to employee management and development.Cost: There is no cost for this course.Register to Attend Managers Academy, EMCE Blended Version Making Virtual Meetings Inclusive: Exploring Equity GapsDates: June 21 Time: 2:00 pm-3:00 pm Virtual SessionMaking Virtual Meetings Inclusive: Exploring Equity Gaps, will provide staff and faculty with an opportunity to unpack the challenges and gaps that may exist in virtual meetings. Learners will explore four common equity barriers to inclusive meetings and will gain strategies to mitigate barriers to intentionally create more inclusive spaces in virtual meetings.Cost: There is no cost for this course.Register to Attend Making Virtual Meetings Inclusive FranklinCovey: The 6 Critical Practices of Leading a TeamDates: July 13, 14 & 15 Time: 9:00 am-11:30 pm, each day Virtual SessionThe program is ideal for supervisors and managers who need to transition successfully from individual contributors to leaders of others. It also applies to leaders who have been in their roles for some time and are looking for practical and relevant guidance on how to effectively lead and manage their teams.CostOne-time charge of $90.38 for enrollment in the FranklinCovey All Access Pass, which unlocks a ton of virtual content and learning resources and allows you to take additional FC classes with CU Boulder for no cost through August 30Register to Attend 6 Critical Practices Leading at the Speed of TrustDates: July 19 – 22 Time: 9:00 am-11:00 am, each day Virtual Session Trust is not merely a soft, social virtue; rather, trust is a pragmatic, hard-edged, economic, and actionable asset that you can create. There is a compelling business case for trust. Teams and organizations that operate with high trust significantly out-perform teams and organizations with low trust. This has been proven in dozens of studies, across a multitude of industries and sectors. The Speed of Trust Practice helps organizations better manage change and create high-performing teams that are agile, collaborative, innovative, and engaged.  CostOne-time charge of $90.38 for enrollment in the FranklinCovey All Access Pass, which unlocks a ton of virtual content and learning resources and allows you to take additional FC classes with CU Boulder for no cost through August 30Register to Attend Leading at the Speed of Trust Getting Things DoneDates: July 27 & 29 Time: 9:00 am-11:00 am and 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm each day Virtual Session Trust is not merely a soft, social virtue; rather, trust is a pragmatic, hard-edged, economic, and actionable asset that you can create. There is a compelling business case for trust. Teams and organizations that operate with high trust significantly out-perform teams and organizations with low trust. This has been proven in dozens of studies, across a multitude of industries and sectors.The Speed of Trust Practice helps organizations better manage change and create high-performing teams that are agile, collaborative, innovative, and engaged.  Cost$150 Register to Attend Getting Things DoneTags:Newslast_img read more

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City Puts Forward Proposal For New Street Vending Ordinance

first_img1:45 | Play story Add to My ListIn My List After months of legal battles, Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed has introduced a proposal for a new public street vending ordinance, which could be in place as early as next week.The proposal, which the mayor promised to introduce by year’s end, regulates what vendors can sell, what their carts can look like and where they can hawk their wares.As heard on the radio1:45Deputy Chief Operating Officer Hans Utz says the city worked with vendors on the proposal and looked at policies in other cities, like New York City, Los Angeles, Portland and Charlotte, when drafting it. Utz says the new plan simplifies the application and enforcement process while also leveling the field between brick-and-mortar stores and street vendors, at a lower cost to the vendors.“The changes that we’ve made in the program should straighten all of that out, as well as move away from that unhygienic swap-meet aesthetic that we were suffering under previously,” Utz said.Under the proposal, vendors could sell at 31 spots downtown – 19 permanent, city-owned kiosks and 12 other designated locations – with about 50 more potential spots to come starting next year. MARTA stations, particularly the Five Points stop, and Turner Field, however, would be off limits, the city says vendors could apply for private vending permits to sell at the latter.“It’s like taking my business up out of the middle of downtown and kicking me out at a fishing hole and leaving me to try to make the same money,” says Larry Miller, president of the Atlanta Vendors Association, who used to set up his stands around Turner Field.The proposal also bans tables, tents and other “semi-permanent or permanent structures” other than the 19 kiosks; only mobile carts would be allowed.  That’s a point Miller also takes issue with, because he says it will limit how much merchandise he can cart around and sell, cutting into his profits.“It’s kind of hard to take a position that it’s a good thing when the administration themselves put us out of business, and not even taking under consideration all the hardship they have put on these vendors,” Miller says. “And now they want us to hug them and tell them thank you for an ordinance that does not include all of us.”Vendors have been out of work March, when they were cleared out while the city crafted a new plan after the standing ordinance, which was established under former-Mayor Shirley Franklin, was found unconstitutional. That’s despite orders from a Fulton County judge to issue permits under the prior ordinance.The city is currently appealing that order with the Georgia Supreme Court.Utz says the city plans to move forward with the appeal, but hopes the new proposal can solve the ongoing legal dispute.“What we’re hoping to demonstrate with all of the work that’s gone into this proposal historically, as well as our hope that the vendors will continue to work with us going forward, is that frankly it will render all of that moot,” Utz said.The proposal was introduced and passed Tuesday at a committee meeting – and now head’s to Monday’s city council meeting for a full vote.  Legal Advocate Discusses Medical Abuse At Shut Down Georgia ICE Facility Share For Whom The Bell Rings Related Stories ‘It’s Fractured’: Georgia Lt. Gov. Geoff Duncan On Healing Republican Partylast_img read more

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VR Developers Conference advisory boards announced

first_imgVR Developers Conference advisory boards announcedNew event will be part of GDC 2016 in San FranciscoRachel WeberSenior EditorTuesday 27th October 2015Share this article Recommend Tweet ShareThe VR Developers Conference (VRDC) is a new event that will make its debut during the 2016 Game Developers Conference in San Francisco and its inaugural advisory boards have just been announced. “The Game VR/AR track will feature a number of lectures featuring practical takeaways for exciting, current work happening in VR and AR game development,” said event organiser UBM Tech Game Network.The Advisory Board for the Game VR/AR Track:Colin Northway – Northway GamesAlex Schewartz – Owlchemy Labs Robin Hunicke – Funomena Chris Pruett – Robot InvaderDan Hurd – Playful Corps”Of course, virtual and augmented reality development extends beyond the realm of games. VRDC organizers recognize this. The Entertainment VR/AR track of talks at VRDC will encompass VR and AR applications, design, implementation and development across multiple industries including entertainment, travel, fitness, journalism, and sports.”The Advisory Board for the Entertainment VR/AR Track:Pete Isensee – HBO Code Labs Aaron Lemke – Unello DesignIkrima Elhassan – Kite & LightningEthan Stearns – Legendary EntertainmentCelebrating employer excellence in the video games industry8th July 2021Submit your company Sign up for The VR & AR newsletter and get the best of GamesIndustry.biz in your inbox. Enter your email addressMore storiesEA Play Live set for July 22Formerly E3-adjacent event moves to take place a month and half after the ESA’s showBy Jeffrey Rousseau 9 hours agoGenesis Noir nabs four nominations in 2021 IGF AwardsOther games in the running for Seumas McNally Grand Prize include Paradise Killer, Teardown, Chicory: A Colorful Tale, Umurani Generation, and SpiritfarerBy Brendan Sinclair 4 days agoLatest comments Sign in to contributeEmail addressPasswordSign in Need an account? Register now.last_img read more

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Adviser moves are hopping as 2020 — finally — comes to a close

first_imgYou have read 571 of 3 free articles this week. Register now for increased access.Register for free access to this article.By registering, you can read up to 3 articles per week.RegisterAlready registered? Sign in to continue reading or subscribe for unlimited access.,MOST READ InvestCloud to acquire Advicent and NaviPlan planning software Why Tony Robbins, tax shelters and financial advisers don’t mix 5 4 The Gates divorce: Lessons for financial advisers 1 House panel unanimously passes SECURE 2.0 2 House committee poised to advance SECURE 2.0 retirement savings bill 3 Subscribe for original insights, commentary and analysis of the issues facing the financial advice community, from the InvestmentNews team. Newsletterslast_img read more

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