MTNs We Believe Video Contest Winner Receives Ushs 10 Million in Cash

first_imgAdvertisement MTN Uganda recently provided Ugandans with the opportunity to win Ushs 10 million in cash by simply developing and shooting a music video using the official MTN Uganda Cranes song – ‘We believe’; On Wednesday, 25th September 2013, MTN handed over the Grand Prize to Mr. Vincent Sekyanzi who emerged as the overall winner after a thorough judging exercise.Launched in August, the contest attracted several entries from enthusiastic Ugandans who saw the initiative as an opportunity to demonstrate their creativity and get rewarded for it. The competition ran from the 21st of August to the 30th of August 2013 and clearly demonstrated Uganda’s ability to work under severe pressure delivering quality results.Handing over the Grand prize money, MTN’s Chief Marketing Officer, Mr. Ernst Fonternel said the contest is one way in which MTN is leading the delivery of a bold, new Digital World by offering customers the ability to produce digital music videos for upload onto Youtube and to get exposure to our more than 190,000 Social Media fans. By offering World-class connectivity, all Ugandans will now be able to view Vincent’s video and also aspire to take part in the numerous exciting offers, competitions and promotions that MTN continue to bring to the market. “We hope that this win plus the prize money opens many doors of opportunity for Vincent. With over 1,300 views of his video on MTN’s Youtube channel, I believe Mr. Sekyanzi’s professional ambitions have been greatly boosted and MTN continues to succeed on our mission of making our customers’ lives a whole lot brighter.” – Advertisement – “With so many views in just over one week, it demonstrates the communication power of social media and MTN is making sure we are getting part of the action. Through Social media we are leading the delivery of a bold, new Digital World to our customers to make their lives a whole lot brighter”  Fonternel concluded.The winner was chosen by a special panel of advertising experts who considered creativity and originality of the video idea as part of the selection criteria.On his part, Sekyanzi thanked MTN Uganda for coming up with the music video contest saying, “This promotion gave creative Ugandan minds, the opportunity to put their creativity to use. I’m confident that fellow contestants came up with very interesting videos, from which MTN Uganda chose mine. I’m therefore grateful and honored to have won in what I’m sure was a very close contest”Sekyanzi appealed to other Ugandan companies to pick a leaf from MTN Uganda, and use their businesses to promote innovation by creating opportunities for people to put their talent in practice.last_img read more

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Alliance for Affordable Internet launches to stimulate global policy reform

first_imgAdvertisement Global sponsors Google, Omidyar Network, UK DFID and USAID joined by a host of governments, tech companies and civil society organisations from developed and developing countries in launch of new initiative, backed by Web inventor Sir Tim Berners-Lee.Alliance for Affordable Internet (A4AI) executive director, Sonia JorgeToday, a diverse group of private and public sector players came together to launch the Alliance for Affordable Internet (A4AI), a coalition to lead policy and regulatory reform and spur action to drive down artificially high internet prices in developing countries. By advocating for open, competitive and innovative broadband markets, A4AI aims to help access prices fall to below 5% of monthly income worldwide, a target set by the UN Broadband Commission. Reaching this goal can help to connect the two-thirds of the world that is presently not connected to the internet (source: ITU) and make universal access a reality.A4AI’s 30+ members reach across boundaries of geography, industry, and organisation type and include governments, companies, and civil society organisations from both developed and developing countries. Members share a belief that that policy reform, underpinned by robust research and genuine knowledge-sharing, is one of the best ways to unlock rapid gains in internet penetration rates. The Alliance was initiated by the World Wide Web Foundation, and its honorary chairperson is Dr. Bitange Ndemo, the immediate former Permanent Secretary of Kenya’s Ministry of Information and Communications, who is widely regarded as the father of Broadband in Kenya. – Advertisement – A4AI has a strong focus on action and announced the following plans today at the Commonwealth Telecommunications Organisation’s Annual Forum in Abuja, Nigeria, witnessed by communications ministers, policy makers and industry leaders from around the globe:The Alliance will begin in-country engagements with three to four States by the end of 2013, expanding to at least twelve countries by the end of 2015.Members have committed to a set of policy best practices (enclosed) that will guide advocacy work at the international level. Key policy levers to drive prices down include allowing innovative allocation of spectrum, promoting infrastructure sharing, and increasing transparency and public participation in regulatory decisions.A4AI will produce an annual ‘Affordability Report’, with the first edition being unveiled in December 2013. “The reason for the Alliance is simple – the majority of the world’s people are still not online, usually because they can’t afford to be,” said Sir Tim Berners-Lee, inventor of the Web and founder of the World Wide Web Foundation.“In Mozambique, for example, a recent study showed that using just 1GB of data can cost well over two months wages for the average citizen,” he added.“The result of high prices is a widening digital divide that slows progress in vital areas such as health, education and science. Yet with the advent of affordable smartphones, new undersea cables and innovations in wireless spectrum usage, there is simply no good reason for the digital divide to continue. The real bottleneck now is anti-competitive policies and regulations that keep prices unaffordable. The Alliance is about removing that barrier and helping as many as possible get online at reasonable cost,” concluded Sir Tim Berners-Lee.Dr. Bitange Ndemo, honorary chairperson of A4AI, added:“In Kenya, we saw the number of internet users more than double in a single year after we liberalised markets. Now we need to spark the same revolution on broadband costs and access, not only in my country but around the world. To achieve this, we will use our combined voices, leadership and expertise to press for fair, competitive and socially responsible markets.”Quotes from Global Sponsors of A4AIJennifer Haroon, Access Principal at Google, said: “Nearly two out of every three people don’t have access to the Internet – this is a massive challenge that can’t easily be solved by a single solution or player. The world needs technical innovation and vision to bring more people online, but we also need a strong policy foundation that allows new ideas to flourish. By working alongside Alliance partners, we can help lay the groundwork needed to drive innovation and bring the power of the Internet to more people.”Ory Okolloh, director of investments, Omidyar Network, added: “The lack of affordable internet access in emerging markets is a key barrier to large-scale innovation, which in turn stifles social and economic advancement. Omidyar Network is delighted to help lead the formation of the Alliance for Affordable Internet to address this problem. The Alliance has the potential to help millions of people in the developing world come online, unlocking opportunities for them to access information and services that can meaningfully improve their lives.”Dr. Rajiv Shah, administrator of USAID said:“The growing digital divide is a global issue that can only be tackled collaboratively, and we are thrilled to be working with the diverse and committed group of the Alliance for Affordable Internet to enable even the most remote and impoverished communities to access the wealth of knowledge and connection that exists in the digital world.”Professor Tim Unwin, Secretary General, CTO’s:“In a world where information sharing and communication is increasingly dominated by the internet, it is essential that everyone should have access to it at prices they can afford.  The rapid expansion of all types of ICTs is nevertheless currently leading to ever-greater inequalities in the world, and so the creation of the Alliance for Affordable Internet is timely and important. By working together in carefully crafted partnerships, we can seek to redress this balance and turn rhetoric into reality.” Download the Full List of Alliance Members: http://www.apo-mail.org/131007.pdflast_img read more

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ZTE Launches the water proof LTE enabled GH800

first_imgAdvertisement ZTE Corporation, on saturday launched the GH800, an LTE-enabled large-screen smart-broadband trunking mobile handset, at GITEX TECHNOLOGY WEEK in Dubai.It has a 4-inch 480×800 WVGA LCD multi-point touch capacitive screen and can be submerged in water up to a metre deep for about 30 minutes without disrupting its performance.It has shock and vibration absorption and the capacity to withstand solar radiation, making it highly reliable, especially in extreme environments. – Advertisement – The GH800’s LTE-enabled GoTa 4G intelligent platform and customised secure operating system supports wireless broadband, near field communication and global positioning.The GH800 can facilitate the efficient running of multimedia trunking applications and provides an improved user experience for people working in challenging environments, making it ideal for use in a large number of industries including government, public security, transportation, logistics, oil, electricity, mining, factories and other enterprises and institutions.“LTE is the mainstream choice for 4G network construction. The successful launch of mature commercialised terminals such as the GH800 consolidates our position as leaders in the LTE market,” says Miao Wenguang, Marketing Director at ZTE.multimedia services.Source: itp.netlast_img read more

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SolarNow SunFunder Announce 9M Debt Financing to Reach 17500 Customers in Uganda

first_imgAdvertisement Solar energy company, SolarNow has announced raising $9 million in debt arranged by SunFunder, a longtime debt financier for the company alongside co-lenders responsAbility and Oikocredit.The $9 million facility is SolarNow’s third structured asset finance instrument, or SAFI, arranged by SunFunder. It will enable the company to deploy 17,500 new off-grid solar systems to customers in Uganda, along with a range of appliances.SolarNow CEO Willem Nolens commented: “This syndication and the SAFI structure allow us to minimize the fundraising burden and to focus on our business instead. By selecting the right clients and treating them well, our credit portfolio remains healthy and we create a strong foundation for sustainable growth.” – Advertisement – This new investment also marks the 5th anniversary of SolarNow’s partnership with SunFunder, and their debt facility together as well as the second time that Oikocredit and a responsAbility-managed private debt fund have participated with SunFunder to finance the company, after a similar $6m syndication 14 months ago.According to the announcement, the new systems will amount to around 2.5MW of new installed off-grid solar capacity, resulting in over 210,000 tons of greenhouse gas emissions avoided through displaced kerosene for lighting.As far as impact is concerned, SolarNow estimates that over 70,000 women will gain improved energy access in Uganda. Oikocredit’s Renewable Energy Manager David ten Kroode commented: “Their [SolarNow’s] strategy of offering a wide range of solar products and services to energy-poor communities is perfectly aligned with Oikocredit’s mission to help alleviate poverty by improving access to energy.”The SAFI product is a tailored receivables financing structure designed by SunFunder for solar companies deploying systems through pay-as-you-go and solar leasing models. SAFI finances their credit offerings directly, allowing them to reach more customers.[related-posts]last_img read more

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STARTERS ORDERS Wednesday

first_img[dropcap]W[/dropcap]elcome to Starters Orders. Our daily midday update from the trading room at Star Sports with our key market movers for the day across all sports.Wednesday 1 JanuaryRACING1.35 MusselburghUpsilon Bleu 4/1 > 11/41.55 CheltenhamFlorafern attracting interest at 10’s3.10 SouthwellExceeding Power 7/4 > 11/10What’s your view?CALL STAR SPORTS ON 08000 521 321last_img

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STARTERS ORDERS Saturday

first_imgHORSE RACING3.00 HaydockJust Hiss 9/1 > 6/17.10 LingfieldQueens Royale 8/1 > 11/4 Stopdworldnletmeof 22/1 > 7/17.30 KilbegganA Rated 10/1 > 6/18.50 AyrQuestion Of Faith 12/1 > 8/1PREMIER LEAGUEPremier League12:30 Sky Sports Premier League / Sky Sports Main Event / Sky Sports Ultra HD4/1 Watford 8/15 Liverpool 11/4 DRAWPremier League17:30 BT Sport 1 / BT Sport 4K UHD9/1 Brighton & Hove Albion 1/3 Man City 9/2 DRAWBET WITH STAR SPORTS 08000 521 321 [dropcap]W[/dropcap]elcome to Starters Orders. Our daily midday update from the trading room at Star Sports with our key market movers for the day across all sports.Saturday 12 Augustlast_img read more

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SIMON NOTT Was what Ed said Balls

first_img[dropcap]T[/dropcap]here has been some conversation on social media on what ITV’s Ed Chamberlin said at the Gimcrack dinner then reported in the Racing Post. In a nutshell it wasn’t controversial at all, just common sense, racing needs to modernise and attract new people. It’s pretty obvious that if it doesn’t it’s going to be in serious trouble in a generation.People on-line have been screaming the place down saying that events held at racecourse on the same day as racing don’t attract people that are interested in racing, it dilutes the sport and deters ‘real racing fans’ from attending. It’s actually not new, if you go back far enough in racing history it soon becomes apparent that in the (very) old days, ‘race day’ was an all-encompassing jolly up for the entire community. A lost of towns came to a halt with a public holiday for all. The races went ahead as did a whole lot of other stuff did in parallel, something for everyone. It would probably be to the detriment of local business if Southwell followed suit with the holidays, but you know what I’m saying.Back to the concerts, I always thought that they were a good idea, they certainly get people into a racecourse that wouldn’t have thought about going racing otherwise, bingo. However, the original conception was to then try and sell racing to those people once they were in, but it doesn’t seem to happen. To the contrary, I have heard racecourse announcers almost apologetically inform patrons that ‘there are only three races to go before the concert’. People need to be engaged, depending on the act booked and that is where racecourses need to think carefully too, different angles need to be used. If for argument’s sake a teeny bopper band are booked then gambling can’t be the main incentive, nor drink, surely the latter should never be. The excitement of a horse race can still be instilled in those under 18’s. It needs to be treated as an investment for the future. How about something simple like each kid on arrival has to pick a horse in the feature race, those that pick the winner then go into a free draw for a couple of them to meet the band backstage? Something along those lines? I’m sure it wouldn’t take much brainstorming to come up with a more sophisticated idea than mine. One thing is for sure, there should be discounted non-band tickets for racegoers who are interested and bookmakers that don’t benefit from racegoers that don’t bet.I wrote about attracting the nightclub set and the habits they bring with them at weekends previously here sentiments haven’t changed. Instead of plying them with booze, getting them to bet with the bookies or fair’s fair (they’ll soon realise where the value lies) the Tote should they wish, should be the way forward. Don’t give them free pints but free punts, the bookies/tote to be squared up afterwards, at least then some interest has been taken by the new racegoer in actually looking at the horse names and the mechanics of having a bet. I’m not so sure that for a first timer fan-faring of jockeys and talking heads giving their expert opinion would be of much value. Of course, that’s open for debate, though certainly not the latter, giving people, an instant inferiority complex isn’t the way forward and something lost on some in the industry. Everyone who has now classed themselves as a ‘real racing fan’ will remember the day they first went racing, or their first trip to the betting shop that hooked them. Let’s pool those ideas and see if there’s an angle there.To conclude, Ed’s not talking balls he is talking sense. Racing has a massive amount to offer. Where do you start? It’s got colour, excitement, characters, glamour, world class sport, adrenaline on tap and was ahead of its time as a social melting pot. Where else can you go in the UK even and (almost) rub shoulders with the Queen. Racing should be a PR company’s wet dream. Racing needs to get a decent tank together and put their brand publicity up for tender. A top-class PR company, in no way racing affiliated, should be able to transform the image and fortunes of the sport and relish the challenge of doing so. There’s so much to sell, PR gurus form an orderly queue.Simon NottSimon Nott is author of Skint Mob!: Tales from the Betting RingCLICK HERE FOR MORE DETAILSlast_img read more

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Barnett Named Chair of Rice Board of Governors

first_imgAddThis ShareContact: Kathryn Costello Vice President University Advancement (713) 527-4650 Michael Cinelli Director, News Office(713) 831-4794 BARNETT NAMED CHAIR OF RICE BOARD OF GOVERNORSE. William “Bill” Barnett, managing partner of the Baker & Botts law firm, has been chosen as chair ofthe Rice University Board of Governors effective July 1, 1996. Barnett, 63, will succeed Charles W. Duncan, Jr., who is retiring after serving as board chair for the past 14 years at the private university. During this time, Duncan successfully led the effort to strengthen and enhance the university’s national andinternational reputation.“Bill Barnett will be a distinguished and able chairman,” Duncan said. “He brings broad experience, a thoughtful approach, a great deal of knowledge about Rice and, importantly, a deep commitment to the university. He is a Rice graduate who has demonstrated excellent leadership capabilities. I believe Rice will continue to prosperunder his chairmanship.” Rice President Malcolm Gillis said, “The selection of Bill Barnett ensures a high degree of continuity with the immensely successful chairmanship of Charles Duncan. Charles’ years as board chair have been extremely fruitful. His tenure was marked by notabledevelopments that will shape the future of Rice for decades to come. Not least of these was Rice’s 1985 admission to the Association of American Universities, the highly influential organization of top echelon research universities. Rice University will be forever inhis debt.“Bill Barnett brings to the chair a deep knowledge of and affection for his alma mater, along with a well-developed appreciation of the university’s very substantial potentialities in teaching and research in the coming century,” Gillis added. “No university has had a more distinguished succession of board chairsthan Rice. Bill Barnett is squarely in that elite company.” Barnett received his B.A. from Rice in 1955 and his LL.B. in 1958 from the University of Texas at Austin. He has led a distinguished career as an attorney and as a civic leader. He is former chairman of the Antitrust Section of the American Bar Association and is a fellow of the American College of TrialLawyers. He is past chairman and current board member of the Greater Houston Partnership, past chairman and current board member of Central Houston, Inc., and serves on the board of directors of Texas Commerce Bancshares. He is a trustee of Baylor College of Medicine and is a life trustee of the University of Texas Law SchoolFoundation. Barnett joined the Rice Board of Governors in 1991 as a term member. He was elected a trustee in 1994. He is also a contributing life member of the Rice Associates, a member of the Rice UniversityFund Council, and a member of the Friends of Fondren.“I am honored by this opportunity,” Barnett said. “If one looks at the history of Rice, three chairmen stand out as truly great- Capt. James A. Baker, George R. Brown and Charles Duncan. Charles is an imposing act to follow, but he has positioned the university very favorably. Within the last few years, particularly with the arrival of Malcolm Gillis, Rice is moving more aggressively toward an international presence, the faculty in several areas are on the cutting edge, and the student body is as strong as any university inthe country. This is a very exciting time to be involved at Rice.” During Duncan’s tenure as board chair the university’s endowment has grown to $1.7 billion from $434 million.Since 1983 nine buildings have been added to the campus landscape or are currently under construction: George R. Brown Hall, Alice Pratt Brown Hall, Herring Hall, the Mudd Building, the Mechanical Engineering Building, the Computational Engineering Building, the future home of the James A. Baker III Institute forPublic Policy, the building that will house the Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, and the campus police building. Barnett is married to Peggy Mauk Barnett, a 1955 Rice graduate. They have two children, Margaret Ann Barnett Stern and Edward William Barnett, Jr., both of Houston.The Rice Board of Governors is comprised of seven trustees, eight term governors and four alumni governors. There are also seven trustee emerti and 47 governor advisors. ###last_img read more

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Rice University to host An Evening with Mignon R Moore

first_imgAddThis ShareDavid Ruth713-348-6327david@rice.eduAmy Hodges713-348-6777amy.hodges@rice.eduRice University to host ‘An Evening with Mignon R. Moore’Author, sociologist to discuss race, class, sexual orientation at Feb. 1 lectureAuthor and sociologist Mignon Moore will discuss how gay identities, relationships and motherhood shape the lives of black women when Rice University hosts “An Evening with Mignon R. Moore” Feb. 1 at 6 p.m.What: “An Evening with Mignon R. Moore.”When: 6 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 1.Where: Room 100 in Rice University’s Herring Hall, 6100 Main St.Moore is an associate professor of sociology at the University of California-Los Angeles and author of “Invisible Families: Gay Identities, Relationships and Motherhood Among Black Women.”. A reception and book signing will follow the lecture.The event will be co-sponsored by Race Scholars at Rice, part of the Kinder Institute for Urban Research, Rice’s Center for the Study of Women, Gender and Sexuality, Rice’s Department of Sociology, OutSmart magazine, KPFT’s “Queer Voices” and the Houston Public Library.For more information, visit http://kinder.rice.edu/rsr/iflecture. To schedule an interview or obtain media credentials, contact Amy Hodges at 713-348-6777 or amy.hodges@rice.edu.For a map of Rice University’s campus, go to www.rice.edu/maps/maps.html.-30-Kinder Institute for Urban Research: http://kinder.rice.edu.last_img read more

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Study Ocean acidification already slowing coral reef growth

first_imgAddThis Share3David Ruth713-348-6327david@rice.eduJade Boyd713-348-6778jadeboyd@rice.eduStudy: Ocean acidification already slowing coral reef growthExperiment dials back clock to test ocean reef growth in preindustrial conditions HOUSTON — (Feb. 25, 2016) — An international team of scientists from the Carnegie Institution for Science, Rice University and other institutions has performed the first experiment to manipulate seawater chemistry in a natural coral-reef community to determine the effect that excess carbon dioxide released by human activity is having on coral reefs.The research, which is published in this week’s issue of Nature, was conducted in a lagoon on the southern Great Barrier Reef in Australia in 2014. By controlling the alkalinity on a portion of the reef, the team was able to examine how fast the reef is growing today and compare that with growth rates in less acidic conditions that existed prior to the Industrial Revolution.By controlling the alkalinity on a portion of the Great Barrier Reef, a team that included Rice University BioSciences researcher Kai Zhu was able to examine how fast the reef is growing today and compare that with growth rates in less acidic conditions that existed prior to the Industrial Revolution.“Our work provides the first strong evidence from experiments on a natural ecosystem that ocean acidification is already causing reefs to grow more slowly than they did 100 years ago,” said study lead author Rebecca Albright, a marine biologist in Carnegie’s Department of Global Ecology in Stanford, Calif. “Ocean acidification is already taking its toll on coral reef communities. This is no longer a fear for the future; it is the reality of today.”The research team included Rice’s Kai Zhu, an expert in ecological statistics who joined Rice as a Huxley Faculty Fellow in the Department of BioSciences in January following a postdoctoral appointment at Carnegie’s Department of Global Ecology.“The data analysis for the experiment was complicated by the natural variation of conditions in the reef,” Zhu said. “Statistically speaking, there was a great deal of noise in the data, and as scientists we needed to filter out the noise so that we could examine only the signal, the change in the growth rate that resulted from the change in alkalinity.”Zhu designed a statistical model that was capable of quantifying the variation that occurred both naturally — in a portion of the reef that was measured as an experimental control — and as a result of the experiment. The data showed that the reef grew about 7 percent faster when seawater acidity approximated that of preindustrial conditions.The carbon dioxide that is released into the atmosphere from fossil-fuel consumption acts as a greenhouse gas and negatively impacts the world’s oceans, said Carnegie’s Ken Caldeira, the study’s lead scientist. Ocean impacts of carbon dioxide are partially due to overall warming caused by climate change. But in addition, most atmospheric carbon dioxide is eventually absorbed by oceans and reacts with seawater to form an acid that is corrosive to coral reefs, shellfish and other marine life. This process is known as “ocean acidification.”Kai ZhuCaldeira said coral reefs are particularly vulnerable to ocean acidification, because reef architecture is built by the accretion, or buildup, of calcium carbonate through a process called calcification. Calcification becomes increasingly difficult as acid concentrations increase and the surrounding water’s pH decreases. Scientists have predicted that reefs could begin dissolving within the century if acidification continues and reefs switch from carbonate accretion to carbonate dissolution.Previous studies have demonstrated large-scale declines in coral reefs over recent decades. Work from another team led by Caldeira found that rates of reef calcification were 40 percent lower in 2008 and 2009 than they were during the same season in 1975 and 1976. But it has been difficult to pinpoint exactly how much of the decline is due to acidification and how much is caused by warming, pollution and overfishing.In the current study, the team manipulated the alkalinity of seawater flowing over a reef flat off Australia’s One Tree Island. They brought the reef’s pH closer to what it would have been in the preindustrial period based on estimates of atmospheric carbon dioxide from the era. They then measured the reef’s calcification in response to this pH increase. They found that calcification rates under these manipulated preindustrial conditions were about 7 percent higher than they are today.Caldeira said some researchers have proposed increasing the alkalinity of ocean water around coral reefs through geoengineering to save shallow marine ecosystems. The results of the new study show that this idea could be effective, but he said it would likely be impractical to implement on all but the smallest scales.“The only real, lasting way to protect coral reefs is to make deep cuts in our carbon dioxide emissions,” Caldeira said. “If we don’t take action on this issue very rapidly, coral reefs — and everything that depends on them, including both wildlife and local communities — will not survive into the next century.”Additional study co-authors include Carnegie’s Lilian Caldeira, Lester Kwiatkowski, Jana Maclaren (also of Stanford University), Yana Nebuchina, Julia Pongratz (now at Max Planck Institute for Meteorology), Katharine Ricke, Kenny Schneider (now at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem) and Marine Sesboue; as well as Jessica Hosfelt and Aaron Ninokawa of the University of California, Davis; Benjamin Mason of Stanford University; Tanya Rivlin of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem; Kathryn Shamberger of both Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and Texas A&M University; and Kennedy Wolfe of the University of Sydney.The research was supported by the Carnegie Institution for Science and the Fund for Innovative Climate and Energy Research.-30-High-resolution IMAGES are available for download at:http://news.rice.edu/files/2016/02/0229_REEF-zhu88-lg-1o6c39t.jpgCAPTION: Kai Zhu(Photo by Jeff Fitlow/Rice University)Additional photos are available at:http://dge.stanford.edu/labs/caldeiralab/OneTreePress/OneTreePressPhotos.htmlA video about the research is available at:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fEqCqZId39MThe DOI of the Nature paper is:10.1038/nature17155A copy of the paper is available at:http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nature17155.html Located on a 300-acre forested campus in Houston, Rice University is consistently ranked among the nation’s top 20 universities by U.S. News & World Report. Rice has highly respected schools of Architecture, Business, Continuing Studies, Engineering, Humanities, Music, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences and is home to the Baker Institute for Public Policy. With 3,910 undergraduates and 2,809 graduate students, Rice’s undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is 6-to-1. Its residential college system builds close-knit communities and lifelong friendships, just one reason why Rice is ranked No. 1 for best quality of life and for lots of race/class interaction by the Princeton Review. Rice is also rated as a best value among private universities by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance. To read “What they’re saying about Rice,” go to http://tinyurl.com/AboutRiceUniversity.last_img read more

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