LIAT Chairman Stepping Down

first_img Sharing is caring! 147 Views   no discussions Share Share BusinessLocalNewsRegional LIAT Chairman Stepping Down by: – December 19, 2019center_img Share Tweet                                                                      Dr Jean Holder(Caribbean360) Regional airline LIAT will have to start looking for a new chairman.The Antigua-based company announced in a statement yesterday that, after 16 years in the position, Dr Jean Holder is retiring.He informed shareholders at LIAT’s Annual General Meeting held in Antigua on Monday, that he would not be available for nomination as a Director of LIAT’s Board for the next term.“Dr Holder stated that it was fulfilling to perform this role in such a critical regional institution. He thanked the shareholders and customers for their continued support; the employees for their hard work and commitment to continuous improvement and all the other stakeholders who through their patience, contributed to the ongoing safe operation of LIAT,” the LIAT statement said.Prime Minister of St Vincent and the Grenadines, Dr Ralph Gonsalves thanked Dr Holder on behalf of all shareholders, “for his outstanding contribution in the oversight of the Board of Directors in some extraordinarily difficult times”.He said working with the LIAT chairman had enriched him and he expressed immense gratitude.“LIAT wishes Dr. Holder the very best in his future endeavours and with the shareholders, join in thanking him for his long and dedicated service to the company,” the statement concluded.last_img read more

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Hill Dickinson sadly announces the death of Patrick Hawkins

first_imgIt is with great sadness that Hill Dickinson announces the untimely passing of the managing partner of its Greek office, Patrick Hawkins. Patrick died in hospital on Thursday 20 August 2020, having suffered a heart attack in early July. His funeral took place in Athens on Monday (August 24). Tributes to the 59-year-old industry giant have been flooding in from clients, colleagues and maritime associates. In addition to an outpouring of respect for this “extremely knowledgeable”, “dedicated” and “principled practitioner of the law”, many recall with fondness Patrick’s “charm, modesty and tremendous sense of humour”. While being a leading practitioner in his own right he is particularly remembered within Hill Dickinson for his mentoring skills and his ability to nurture young talent. Many former colleagues have recalled the important influence he has had on their careers. Hill Dickinson colleague and partner in the Piraeus office, Maria Moisidou, remarked: “According to Patrick, success is measured by the number of the partners of the future he or she has mentored and created. Based on his own definition, Patrick was extremely successful, having shared his practice, knowledge and experience with the future generations by building up lasting relationships based on unlimited trust. So many of us would not be where we are now without Patrick.” Sea News, August 27 Fluent in Greek, Patrick was heavily involved in both wet and dry litigation for the Greek shipping market. He regularly handled complex work in the High Court in the UK and in London-based arbitration proceedings. He had a particular expertise in salvage work, acting both for owners and their insurers as well as a number of leading salvors in the Greek market. Awarding him its ‘Leading Individual’ award in 2019, Legal 500 described Patrick as ‘a leading figure in the market for many years’. “Patrick had a very solid foundation in terms of knowledge of the law and could deploy that quickly, which is an asset in complex situations. Coupled with that was the intellectual rigour to adopt a methodical and forensic approach as and when the case required it. This was a winning combination.” “That shock will be shared by all of you who worked with Patrick over his 33 years of association with Hill Dickinson and Hill Taylor Dickinson and in particular the last 26 years as founding partner and head of our Piraeus Office. Our thoughts at this time are with Vicky, his two daughters Myrto and Thalia, his brother Mike and all members of his family in Greece and the UK. He will be greatly missed in both countries by so many of us in the marine industry.” Announcing his death, David Wareing and Tony Goldsmith, heads of Hill Dickinson’s Marine and Trade Group, said: “It is with enormous sadness that we have to inform you of the passing of our much loved colleague Patrick Hawkins. Patrick’s total commitment to his work and clients continued until the day he was taken ill which makes his passing even more of a shock to all his colleagues and friends in Hill Dickinson. (Image Courtesy: Hill Dickinson) Patrick Hawkins was educated at Cambridge University and the College of Law, gaining first class honours in the Law Society finals. He qualified in 1987 and joined Hill Dickinson’s Liverpool office in the same year. On qualification as a solicitor he headed to Athens where he joined Greek law firm Vgenopoulos & Partners, leaving there in 1993 to set up the Piraeus Office of Hill Taylor Dickinson. In 2005 Hill Taylor Dickinson remerged with Hill Dickinson and Patrick continued to lead the Piraeus Office until his death. David Pitlarge, Hill Dickinson partner, who was recruited by Patrick in Piraeus in 2005, recalled: “As a practitioner Patrick was extremely knowledgeable, quick and tremendously versatile. He had a genuine mastery of the various esoteric aspects of shipping law, knowledge of which is required to advise shipping clients. He also understood – very well – all aspects of the law of marine insurance – most recently successfully taking the landmark, and important, case of the Renos to the Supreme Court. This was reflected in his wide client base which included some of the world’s leading shipowners, P&I insurers and salvors. Author: Baibhav Mishra Piraeus colleague and partner Andrew Dyer stressed Patrick’s “particular ability of being able combine a deep legal knowledge with an equally deep commercial appreciation of his clients’ objectives and the necessary commercial angle to resolving their legal problems.” David Wareing noted: “The strength and significance of our Greek office is a lasting legacy to Patrick’s supreme professionalism.” International maritime law specialist Hill Dickinson announces the death of Patrick Hawkins, head of its office in Greece, and pays tribute to this industry giant. David Pitlarge added: “What made him so exceptional was the combination of his humility and unselfishness – often expressed by his willingness to involve others, often younger, more junior or less experienced than him, and give genuine respect to their views. I think one measure of his achievement and distinction is that not only did he succeed himself, showing great professional virtuosity in doing so, but also enabled many others to follow in his footsteps.” Hill Dickinson has opened a virtual Book of Remembrance on its website www.hilldickinson.com and a commemorative service will be held in Greece as soon as pandemic restrictions are safely lifted.last_img read more

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Dairy Regional Recap: California cow honored as 2015 Holstein Association USA Star of the Breed

first_imgTo find news in your region, click on its link below.advertisementadvertisementSOUTHWESTEASTMIDWEST NORTHWEST—advertisementSOUTHWESTCalifornia cow honored as 2015 Holstein Association USA Star of the BreedA California cow has been named the 2015 “Star of the Breed” by Holstein Association USA. The award combines factors for milk production, classification score and show ring placings during the year.Air-Osa Redbull 12417 EX-95 2E is bred and owned by the Airoso family of Air-Osa Dairy in Pixley, California. She is a daughter of KHW Redbull, out of Cache-Valley Lea Septst2-ET VG-85.Air-Osa Redbull had a great year in the show ring in 2015, being named grand champion of the California State Holstein Show; placing first in the aged cow class and named reserve grand champion at the Western Spring National Holstein Show; and going on to be the fourth-place “150,000-Pound Cow” at the 2015 World Dairy Expo International Holstein Show.Her milk production has been equally as impressive. In her last lactation, calving in at six years and three months of age, Air-Osa Redbull produced 61,020 pounds of milk, with 2,491 pounds of fat and 1,975 pounds of protein (3X). Her lifetime milk production totals 166,190 pounds of milk, 6,086 pounds of fat and 5,284 pounds of protein in four lactations.The Airoso family has been farming outside of Tulare, Calif., since 1912. Today the family partnership includes Joe and Diane Airoso, their son Joey and his wife Laurie, Joey and Laurie’s son, Joseph and wife Kelci, with their two children, Ruby and Phillip. They milk 2,900 registered and identified Holstein cattle with a rolling herd average over 28,000 pounds of energy-corrected milk and farm 1,500 acres of alfalfa, wheat, oats and corn.Read more about the Star of the Breed award.advertisementHistoric Texas Tech dairy barn commemoratedThe Lubbock County Historical Commission and Texas Tech University’s student government have dedicated a state historical marker commemorating the college’s legendary dairy barn.According to the Texas Tech website, construction of the barn started in 1925. It was completed in 1927, at a cost of $29,461 with room for 40 cows. It served not only as an educational facility, but in the early years also housed dairy cattle owned by students. Students could house up to three cows and sell milk and dairy products to cover college costs.The dairy barn is also listed on the National Register of Historic Places.EASTCase studies highlight dairy farm ‘transformation’Case studies showcasing dairy business transformations are now available online through the Pennsylvania Center for Dairy Excellence (CDE). The studies document the decision-making processes of eight farm families using team concepts.Transformation areas include herd expansion, robotic milking systems, renewable energy, business planning, succession planning, direct marketing and employee management.See videos from the families and look at the case studies.FarmStart raises investment levelFarmStart increased the size of investments in beginning farmers’ businesses to $75,000. The increased investment is available to new applicants only.FarmStart, initiated by Farm Credit East and CoBank, invests working capital to help new farming ventures get their business started. Yankee Farm Credit joined the program in 2011.In celebration of the program’s tenth year, Farm Credit East released Investing in the Success of Beginning Farmers: Ten Years of FarmStart profiling 11 FarmStart participants.University of Maine cow sets state butterfat record Holstein Association USA verified the recent production record of UM Eden Padme as a new Maine state record for butterfat production in her age group.At 2 years and 8 months of age, Padme produced 34,280 pounds of milk, with 1,649 pounds of butterfat and 973 pounds of protein in a 350-day lactation.Padme is a member of the dairy herd at the University of Maine’s J.F. Witter Teaching and Research Center in Orono, Maine. The herd is cared for by the University of Maine Applied Dairy Cooperative of Organized Working Students (UMADCOWS).MIDWESTGopher Dairy Camp is June 12-14The 2016 University of Minnesota Gopher Dairy Camp will be held June 12-14 on the St. Paul farm campus. The camp is organized by Gopher Dairy Club and the Minnesota 4-H Dairy Project Committee.Open to youth who have completed grades sixth through ninth (but have not yet started 10th grade), the camp provides dairy youth the opportunity to strengthen their dairy knowledge and skills. Registration fee is $90 and is limited to the first 100 students.Visit the website or call Nicole Krumrie at (320) 296-8603 for more information.NORTHWESTWestern snowpack melting at record speed
The western snowpack dropped at record speed in April, according to data in the latest forecast from USDA Agriculture’s Natural Resources Conservation.Low precipitation and high temperatures led to a dramatic reduction in the Pacific Northwest, said NRCS Hydrologist Cara McCarthy.In western states where snowmelt accounts for the majority of seasonal water supply, information about snowpack serves as an indicator of future water availability. NRCS has installed and maintains more than 800 high-elevation weather stations, known as SNOTEL sites, which transmit hourly updates on snowpack conditions. NRCS will continue monitoring conditions throughout the year.Read the full western forecast or view information by state.  PD Dave NatzkeEditorProgressive DairymanEmail Dave Natzkedave@progressivepublish.com This Dairy Regional Recap includes information on an award-winning California Holstein, a historic Texas dairy barn, the northeast’s FarmStart program for beginning farmers and more. This and other U.S. region-by-region dairy news can be found here.last_img read more

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China: The elephant in the dairy barn

first_imgEditor’s note: The full version of this article is available in a downloadable ebook format. China has been the elephant in the dairy barn for the past 20 years. Robert Collier, professor and former chairman of the Department of Animal Sciences at the University of Arizona, describes it as an “overnight phenomenon.”advertisementadvertisementWhile statistics tell part of the story, what’s the view from inside the country?Progressive Dairyman recently asked five experts to share their experience and insight. From the alfalfa-growing regions of inner Mongolia to the urban metropolis of cities like Shanghai, they have lived and worked in country while witnessing unimaginable change.China’s importance to the worldwide dairy industryA large and growing demand for dairy products in China cannot currently be met with domestic production. The country relies heavily on imports, and the impact is felt by U.S. dairy farmers, dairy-related businesses and academia.With 1.3 billion people, or almost 19 percent of the world’s population, China is the most populous country in the world. And this population is growing with 16 million babies born annually – babies usually fed imported infant formula.“Foreign companies are investing in China because they realize that the demand for milk is not going away, and it is not sustainable to keep importing,” says independent nutritionist Frank Delfino.advertisementDairy-related businesses have their eye on the monstrous potential for sales. “This market seems to be a great place for the major milking equipment manufacturers to roll out new technology, as well as companies with heat detection, rumination and activity tools,” Delfino says.Academia is also seeing the benefit of the expanding dairy industry in China with their growing hunger for both knowledge and trained people. The Chinese respect U.S. expertise in addition to American milk.History of dairy in ChinaThe death of Chairman Mao Zedong in 1976 made private ownership of cows a possibility for the modern Chinese dairy farmer. Over the next 30 years, China began emulating many of the developed world’s habits, including their consumption of dairy products.“In China, the perception is that if you buy milk products, you’re doing well,” explains Jeffrey Elliott of Balchem Corporation.By 2006, China’s Premier Wen Jiabao, head of the government, said, “I have a dream, and my dream is that each Chinese person, especially the children, can afford to buy one jin (500 grams) of milk to drink every day.” His comment changed world dairy markets instantaneously.Dairy nutritionist Walter Chen is a native of China and vividly remembers Jiabao’s comment. “I felt that government finally recognized the importance of dairy products as part of the diets,” he recalls.advertisementWithin two years, the fledgling dairy industry was rocked when more than 300,000 children experienced debilitating kidney stones and renal failure from melamine-tainted milk products. Approximately 12,000 children were hospitalized, and at least six died.More than 20 Chinese companies were found to have added melamine, high in nitrogen, to milk products in order that they would appear to have higher protein content and thus higher value.Chinese consumption of domestic dairy products slowed and imports, especially of infant formula, rose dramatically.Since then, the dairy industry has gone through an entire restructuring process with greater attention devoted to safety.“The large-scale dairies didn’t really take off until the melamine scandal,” Delfino explains. “At that point, the Chinese government made the decision to promote size and safety.From the government’s perspective, it is much easier to control a 5,000-head operation than 500 10-cow operations.”Ultra high-temperature (UHT) processed milk also grew in popularity as the Chinese people viewed the products safer than other forms of pasteurization and storage. As a result, the larger grocery stores of the major metropolitan cities offer Chinese consumers much more milk product variety than is available in the U.S. “Their dairy sections are huge,” Elliott describes.Current state of China’s dairy industryThere are currently three groups of dairy farms in China – backyard cooperatives, medium farms and large, vertically integrated corporate enterprises. Elliott describes each group in greater detail.Chinese backyard farmers who own from five to 50 cows pool their herds on community farms commonly called “cow hotels” (yangzhi xiaoqu). Generally, those dairies don’t have very high milk production. In Elliott’s words, “They’re milking the way we did 50 years ago.” The average production is generally less than 25 kilograms per cow or 55 pounds per day.The second type of Chinese dairy today is medium farms that milk up to 500 cows. More than likely, the same person owns all the cows on a medium-sized farm.At this point, Elliott stops to explain a key difference in addressing herd size. “When you ask how many cows a farmer has, U.S. producers answer with the number of milking cows in their herd,” he explains.“In China, dairymen include every animal on the farm – milking cows, dry cows, growing heifers, baby calves, goats, dogs and cats. The larger their numbers, the more successful they at least appear to be.”Chinese dairy farms that are vertically integrated usually have herds larger than 500 cows. Average production per cow is 28 to 35 kilograms or 62 to 77 pounds per day. These farms own the milk processing plant, the feed mills and the cows.“There are a lot of similarities between large dairies in China and in the U.S. in terms of dairy facilities, milking equipment and feeding practices,” Chen says.Some of the vertically integrated dairies may not own enough cows to supply all their milk processing needs. Therefore, these dairies may also be buying milk in order to meet demand.These large Chinese dairies are targets for the allied industry companies. “The highest-producing dairy operation that I know of in China is averaging 36 kilograms (79 pounds), milking 36,000 head on six dairies,” Delfino says. “They have control over their crop land for silage, import quality forages from the U.S. and Australia, and have identified consistent quality suppliers of feed grains and concentrates.”One thing common to almost all Chinese dairies today is expensive feed. “Feed cost is roughly 50 to 60 percent of milk revenue,” Chen explains.With local production, quality forage and silage is a huge concern.“Many of the large Chinese dairies don’t have control over enough land to guarantee their feed supplies, and there isn’t a ‘culture of quality’ in the farming community,” Delfino says. “The local farmers just want to produce tons, not necessarily tons of top-quality forages.”Historically, Chinese labor has been relatively inexpensive, but that too is changing.“A full-time parlor worker was paid $200 per month in 2008; today, that person is making $500 per month,” Chen explains. “A farm manager of 3,000 cows used to get paid $1,500 per month; in 2016, it’s $4,500 to $5,000 monthly.” With a farm of 5,000 cows employing 160 to 180 people, total labor cost today is high.Like many businesses in the country, corruption is widespread throughout the Chinese dairy industry. Often, milk passing a test is more dependent on the amount of money paid rather than the science.Elliott knows the system. “Giving money to someone to get something done is normal in China,” he explains. “In fact, it’s expected.” Once while having tea, a dairy manager told the U.S. nutritionist he would try their product for 5,000 U.S. dollars. “That money would go directly to him, not the dairy,” Elliott says.And finally, while waste management is a concern for both U.S. and European dairies, the Chinese have found an alternative solution. “They’ve built big digesters that make methane from manure,” Willis says. “They don’t put manure back on the land.”Future challenges for the Chinese dairy industryThe five experts agree that China faces five significant challenges as their dairy industry strains to meet the demands of their people. These challenges are feed quality, production costs, infrastructure, milk integrity and management skills.“China’s greatest limiting factor is accessibility of high-quality forage,” Elliott says. Hay grown in China has widespread quality issues. “Local hay is often all rain-damaged,” explains Willis.Although labor has traditionally been a cheaper expense for Chinese dairies, the future challenges include labor efficiency. Elliott says, “Everything in China is based on hand labor.”Genetics is another production cost that challenges Chinese dairymen. “They have to improve genetics in order to increase milk production,” Willis says.Infrastructure is a third challenge. “I’ve seen dairies less than 5 years old that were already requiring headlock and freestall loop replacement,” Delfino says. Concrete issues and rapid deterioration occurs throughout China.The experts agree the Chinese dairy industry must continue working to address quality issues with regard to milk and milk products. The melamine scare of 2008 must still be overcome.But perhaps the greatest challenge for the Chinese dairy industry is the management skills of their employees. “The Chinese are really, really smart,” Elliott says. “What they are lacking is experience.”Reproduction is a specific challenge. “While they have a huge number of animals, they also have low reproductive success rates,” Collier says. “A 3,000-cow dairy may only be milking 300 animals due to repro problems.”Larger farms are constantly looking for managers from outside of China. “Building a facility is not any guarantee of success if they can’t manage the animals,” Collier says.The experts agree the Chinese dairy industry must continue working to address quality issues with regard to milk and milk products. The melamine scare of 2008 must still be overcome; people remain concerned.Some of the large, vertically integrated corporate dairies are addressing this challenge head-on, such as the Chinese dairy where Willis consults. “They built a new showplace, two rotary parlors milking Jerseys and Holsteins,” he describes.“They invite the public to come there so they can present the image of a healthy, good environment including on-site lab analysis.” The mega dairies are trying to show that they take care of the cattle and make a good, clean milk product. “You can watch the cattle ride on the carousel,” he says. “Their message is clear: You shouldn’t be afraid of the milk you drink.”ConclusionAs the world’s most populous country, China remains the elephant in the dairy barn. Backed by their government, the dairy industry will continue experiencing growing pains as they seek to meet a created demand for milk protein.“It will take years for China to compete,” Collier says. But Chinese native Chen banks on milk’s staying power in China.“More and more people recognize the nutrition of dairy products, especially among the young Chinese,” he says.During the next decade, watch how China handles feed quality, production costs, infrastructure challenges, milk integrity and management skills. Take note of their domestic production and whether their imports continue to grow. Sooner or later, the U.S. dairy industry will be unable to ignore the elephant in the dairy barn.  PDPHOTO 1: “Bulk feed” often arrives at Chinese dairies in bags. Because their economy is based on manual labor, efficiency is one of the greatest challenges facing the industry.PHOTO 2: As recent as six years ago, Chinese dairy farmers would purchase silage from corn farms often transported by bicycle. Since no one farmer owned a lot of ground, as many as 100 different people would bring their silage to the farm as stalks, normally with the corn ears already off. Today, large farms obtain silage by truck similar to U.S. dairies.PHOTO 3: Larger Chinese grocery stores offer consumers much more milk product variety than is available in the U.S. Note the dairy section is labeled “Daily.”PHOTO 4: Flavored UHT milks such as banana are wildly popular in China. UHT milk grew in popularity as the Chinese people viewed the products safer than other forms of pasteurization and storage. The question remains if organic in China means the same as in the U.S. Photos courtesy of Jeffrey P. Elliott.Beyond Print: Click here to get to know the sources used in this feature story.last_img read more

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Dairy loses bid for manure insurance coverage

first_imgA group of insurance companies don’t have to cover a dairy operation’s costs to defend or settle a lawsuit alleging groundwater contamination by the inadequate handling of manure. U.S. District Judge Thomas O. Rice, in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Washington, ruled such coverage is barred under a pollution exclusion in the insurers’ policies, according to Tiffany Dowell Lashmet, assistant professor and extension specialist in agricultural law with Texas A&M Agrilife Extension.advertisementadvertisementIn 2013, several nonprofit groups filed a lawsuit against Cow Palace, located in the lower Yakima Valley, contending manure was improperly stored and managed, and therefore a pollutant under the federal Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA). When the lawsuit was filed, the dairies’ insurance carriers denied a duty to defend or indemnify, claiming that a pollution exclusion clause in the insurance policy excluded this claim.During the course of litigation, the trial court sided with the plaintiffs, finding that manure met the definition of solid waste. In a May 2015 settlement, Cow Palace agreed to take a number of manure management steps.After the settlement was reached with the environmental groups, the dairies filed their own suit in 2016, seeking a declaratory judgment by a court that the insurance companies were required to defend and indemnify the dairies pursuant to the policy. Specifically, the dairies argued that the pollution exclusion did not apply to manure and, even if it did, there was an efficient proximate cause that would require coverage by the insurers (Dolsen Cos. et al. v. QBE Insurance Co. et al., case number 1:16-cv-03141).On Sept. 11, Judge Rice ruled an insurance policy “absolute pollution exclusion” meant the insurers had no duty to defend or indemnify Cow Palace. The reason for this, the judge held, was that in the circumstances surrounding the intitial lawsuit against the dairies, the manure, which allegedly contaminated groundwater did constitute a pollutant, was expressly excluded from the insurance policy’s coverage. Further, the court rejected the dairies’ attempt to argue that the actual cause of the damage was a covered event, rather than a pollutant.This case is now the second time in the last couple of years that a court has held manure contamination of groundwater to be excluded from coverage based upon a pollutant exclusion clause in an insurance policy. A similar result was reached by the Wisconsin Supreme Court in 2014 (Wilson Mutual Insurance Co. v. Falk).advertisementFor more on environmental insurance policies, read: Insurance shortcomings may leave you exposed to costly environmental liability.   Dave NatzkeEditorProgressive DairymanEmail Dave Natzkedave@progressivepublish.comlast_img read more

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The State of Dairy in 2018

first_imgCalifornia in transitionadvertisementadvertisementUncertainty in the MidwestNorthwest turning to short-term Two forms of concentration in the SoutheastApprehension in the Northeast Texas and New Mexico optimisticadvertisement Dave NatzkeEditorProgressive DairymanEmail Dave Natzkedave@progressivepublish.com Last year’s cautious optimism has been replaced by financial concern and worry for many U.S. dairy farmers. Here’s Progressive Dairyman’s “State of Dairy” regional snapshots for early 2018.last_img read more

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Cheese Advent 2019

first_imgThe grocery store chain ALDI made headlines last year when it released a cheese advent calendar. Given all the buzz, we decided to create our dream advent calendar with cow and goat milk cheeses from farms across the country. Nominations were provided by Progressive Dairy producer bloggers and staff. They are listed in no particular order.advertisementadvertisementDid we miss your favorite? Email Emily Gwinemily@progressivepublish.com, and we’ll add it to next year’s calendar.About the cheeses we chose:1. Cave Aged AlpineMarcoot Jersey CreameryGreenville, IllinoisMarcoot Jersey CreameryFrom the website: “‘Asiago meets Swiss’ to create this complex cheese, which features a unique sharpness with age. Ideal for grating over pasta or melting into a creamy alfredo sauce or enjoying as a table cheese.”advertisement“This is one of my favorites as it can sit on a cheeseboard OR can be used in a creamy alfredo sauce. I also love that this cheese is made by fellow female Jersey breeders. Their story is so cool to watch, and they even had an episode on FarmHer’s TV show!”PHOTO: Courtesy Marcoot Jersey Creamery.—Nominated by Pennsylvania dairy farmer Renée Norman-Kenny2. Jeffs’ Select GoudaCaves of FaribaultFaribault, MinnesotaCaves of Faribault“Joint ventures are nothing new in the dairy industry, but it is unique that a delicious cheese resulted from one. Two states and two Jeffs combined to create Caves of Faribault. Made from pasteurized cows’ milk in Wisconsin and cave aged in Minnesota, Jeff’s Select Gouda is like taking a bite of a surprise! The natural, annato-rubbed rind gives it a vibrant orange color with an unexpected bold taste that is just a bit salty and delicious. The rich yellow cheese inside is slightly sweet with nutty caramel undertones and a smooth creamy finish.”advertisementPHOTO: Courtesy Caves of Faribault.—Nominated by Indiana dairy farmer Sam Schwoeppe3. DaganoMichigan State University Dairy StoreLansing, MichiganMichigan State University Dairy StoreFrom the website: “An invention of the MSU dairy. Inspired by Dutch cheeses Gouda & Edam; it is a brined, semi-soft cheese with a smooth elastic body and mild flavor. Like a Swiss, eyes form while aging and contribute to Dagano’s unique aesthetic.”“Dagano is in the Havarti family (which is my favorite). It’s a little harder than the traditional Havarti and has a yellow color, but it has the smooth, delicious taste these cheeses are known for.”PHOTO: Courtesy Michigan State University Dairy Plant.—Nominated by Michigan dairy farmer Ashley Messing-Kennedy4. Tomato Bacon Basil Cheese CurdsDecatur DairyBrodhead, WisconsinDecatur Dairy“I love Decatur Dairy’s fresh and multi-flavored cheese curds. They have so many flavors, it is hard to pick a favorite. This one is their muenster curd with tomato bacon basil flavoring. They are also well-known for their award-winning havarti, muenster and brick cheeses.”—Nominated by PD Editor Karen Lee5. Little Lucy BrieRedhead CreameryBrooton, MinnesotaRedhead CreameryFrom the website: “This smooth and creamy little wheel of brie cheese is extra special to all of us at Redhead Creamery. It’s small, cute and simply irresistible… just like a sweet little girl we know. It’s named after Alise and Lucas’ daughter, Lucy. It’s the perfect sized appetizer for two or three people to enjoy on the grill, baked or simply at room temperature. Enjoy with a glass (or two) of Chardonnay or Frontenac.”“My favorite brie.”PHOTO: Courtesy Redhead Creamery.—Nominated by Wisconsin dairy farmer Amber McComish6. MarscaponeCrave Brothers Farmstead CheeseWaterloo, WisconsinCrave Brothers Farmstead CheeseFrom the website: “Our farmstead Mascarpone is crafted from fresh, sweet cream. Luxurious and velvety, perfect for sweet and savory culinary applications. Stir into soups, sauces, pasta, risotto or coffee. Pair with strawberries, honey, ginger snaps, chocolate or lemon.”PHOTO: Courtesy Crave Brothers Farmstead Cheese. —Nominated by PD staff7. Muranda BlueMuranda Cheese CompanyWaterloo, New YorkMuranda Cheese CompanyFrom the website: “The strongest of our cheeses, this cows’ milk blue is one-of-a-kind in the Finger Lakes. Aged for about two months, enjoy this blue with any full-bodied red for a taste that will knock your socks off.”“Muranda Blue is one of my favorite blue cheeses as it is creamy and delicious if you love a blue cheese! It is delicious to enjoy in their beautiful event barn with a glass of red wine.”PHOTO: Courtesy Muranda Cheese Company.—Nominated by Pennsylvania dairy farmer Renée Norman-Kenny8. Pleasant Ridge ReserveUplands CheeseDodgeville, WisconsinUplands CheeseFrom the website: “an aged, alpine-style cheese. [It] is made only in the summer months, while our cows are grazing fresh pasture. The sweetness born from the grass-fed milk combines with the savory flavors developed by the cheese’s natural, washed rind. The resulting complexity – rich and salty, with a long, fruity finish – has made Pleasant Ridge one of the most distinctive and celebrated cheeses in the country.”PHOTO: Courtesy Uplands Cheese.—Nominated by Wisconsin dairy farmer Amber McComish9. Sweet GrassBroadrun FarmsBeaver Falls, PennsylvaniaBroadrun Farms“My brother and sister-in-law started making cheese from their organic grazing herd in 2017. Sweet Grass is their newest and best-tasting product to date, in my humble and unbiased opinion. It’s a Gouda style, and a great snacking cheese, as all of the adults and kids in our family can attest.”PHOTO: By Emily Gwin.—Nominated by PD Editor Emily Gwin10. Gouda agedEden CreameryKuna, IdahoEden CreameryFrom the website: “Smooth and creamy texture and yet elastic texture.”PHOTO: Courtesy Eden Creamery. —Nominated by Progressive Publishing IT specialist Tor Osthed11. Chevre Pear Cardamom with cinnamonSweet Pea CheeseNorth Granby, ConnecticutFacebook: Sweet Pea Cheese“If there was ever a perfect cheese for fall, I think this is it. I love the way the sweet pear balances the saltiness of the goat cheese and the cardamom adds a little spice to make the perfect snack with crackers and a glass of fresh apple cider.”PHOTO: By Leslie Hurty.—Nominated by PD Editor Jenna Hurty-Person12. Marinated FetaBrazos Valley CheeseWaco, TexasBrazos Valley CheeseFrom the website: “Our craft feta cheese marinated in olive oil with tomatoes, garlic, and basil, topped off with a pinch of sea salt. Great for salads, snacks, toppings, or straight out of the jar.”PHOTO: Courtesy Brazos Valley Cheese.—Nominated by Progressive Cattle Editor David Cooper13. Bay BlueChapel’s Country CreameryEaston, MarylandChapel’s Country CreameryFrom the website: “Our natural-rind, beautifully veined blue is a Stilton-style variety with creamy undercurrents.”PHOTO: Courtesy Chapel’s Country Creamery. —Nominated by PD staff14. Dilly GirlMuranda CheeseWaterloo, New YorkMuranda CheeseFrom the website: “This medium sharp cheddar with fresh homegrown dill weed and roasted garlic is made from raw milk and offers a mouth full of flavor in every bite. This cheese is a great complement to any full-bodied red, and great on fish.”PHOTO: Courtesy Muranda Cheese Company.—Nominated by Pennsylvania dairy blogger Rebecca Shaw15. ApfelhellerHelvetia CreameryHelvetia, OregonHelvetia CreameryFrom the website: “Our family is now the 6th generation to farm and raise Brown Swiss cows and carry on the tradition of producing Bergkäese (Swiss Alpine cheese) in Helvetia. Apfelheller is a Gruyere style with a delightfully nutty undertone and full-flavored.”PHOTO: Courtesy Helvetia Creamery. —Nominated by PD Editor Audrey Schmitz16. Amish CreameryHeritage Ridge CreameryMiddlebury, IndianaHeritage Ridge CreameryFrom the website: “a mild cheese that uses selected cultures to develop a ‘buttery’ flavor.”“This cheese is a great eating cheese. It has a slightly sharp flavor but is so delicious. I love eating it with meat and a well-paired wine.”PHOTO: Courtesy Michigan Milk Producers Association.—Nominated by Michigan dairy farmer Ashley Messing-Kennedy17. Idaho Golden Greek Grillin’ CheeseBallard Family Dairy and CheeseGooding, IdahoBallard Family Dairy and Cheese“During a 2015 company meeting, the Progressive Publishing staff was able to visit Ballards’ family farm and sample their cheese. There’s just something seriously cool about being able to fry up cubes of cheese in a pan or throw it on the grill.”PHOTO: Courtesy Molly’s Mills.—Nominated by PD Editor Emily Gwin18. Marieke Gouda (Plain Young)Marieke GoudaThorp, WisconsinMarieke GoudaFrom the website: “Creamy, buttery and mild with slightly sweet notes. Pair with peach preserves and toasted almonds, buttery Chardonnay or Amber beer.”“This is my favorite cheese to use when I have guests.”PHOTO: Courtesy Marieke Gouda, LLC.—Nominated by Wisconsin dairy farmer Amber McComish19. North Fork Whiskey Washed MunsterRedhead CreameryBrooton, MinnesotaRedhead CreameryFrom the website: “This award-winning munster cheese was named after our township and the North Fork of the Crow river, based in Redhead Creamery’s back field. Our North Fork Whiskey Washed Munster is a French-style munster that has been washed with local Minnesota 14 Whiskey made at nearby Panther Distillery (Osakis, Minnesota). Its creaminess, stink and pungency are exactly what we are going for. And as a side note… North Fork makes a great grilled cheese and appetizer when warmed up.”PHOTO: Courtesy Redhead Creamery.—Nominated by PD Editor Dave Natzke20. Cheddar cheese B. Kurt DairyBarneveld, WisconsinFacebook: B. Kurt DairyFrom the website: “Bryanna and Dylan Handel started dairy farming in 2014 with 16 cows and a rented barn. In the last four years, they have grown their family, herd and land base. They started making cheese in 2018.”PHOTO: By Bryanna Handel.—Nominated by Wisconsin dairy farmer Brittany Olson21. Estero GoldValley Ford CreameryValley Ford, CaliforniaValley Ford CreameryFrom the website: “Estero gold is handmade in the style of an Asiago, reminiscent of a Montasio, two of the famous cheeses from the Swiss-Italian dairy country. Its subtle, creamy and buttery taste nicely complements other foods. Its fine rustic flavor can be paired with any wine. It also melts wonderfully in pastas and polenta, or try it shredded on a salad.”—Nominated by PD staff22. ChandokaLaClare Family CreameryMalone, WisconsinLaClare Family CreameryFrom the website: “Mild, fruity cheese with rich, cheddary notes. The cow milk develops sweet buttery characteristics, as the goat milk develops sweet tangy notes, creating a wonderfully flavorful cheese.”“This mixed-milk cheese is just right. Not too hard, not too soft. And the goat milk blend deepens and diversifies the flavor beyond what one would expect from a regular cheddar. As a caveat, you can go see for yourself how the cheese is made right at the creamery.”PHOTO: By Peggy Coffeen.—Nominated by PD Editor Peggy Coffeen23. Organic Rogue River BlueRogue CreameryCentral Point, OregonRogue CreameryFrom the website: “On October 18, Rogue River Blue was named World Champion at the World Cheese Awards in Bergamo, Italy, besting 3,800 of the world’s finest cheeses from 42 countries on 6 continents. This is the greatest honor a cheese can receive, and the first time an American-made cheese has been honored with this distinction.”PHOTO: Courtesy Rogue Creamery.—Nominated by Progressive Publishing photographer Mike Dixon24. Smoked CheddarKimberly’s BestKimberly, IdahoKimberly’s Best CreameryFrom the website: “Kimberly’s Best Creamery’s extraordinary milk comes from well-cared-for goats and A1-free milk-producing cows eating only the best quality forages.”“Try it in ‘Carmel Apple Pie with Smoked Cheddar Crust’ – the recipe can be found on the website.”PHOTO: Courtesy Kimberly’s Best. —Nominated by Progressive Publishing Copyeditor Kelly McCoyDownload our cheese advent calendar.last_img read more

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Ultra-Thin Wireless Charging Smartphone Antenna Delivers 10+ Watts

first_imgNuCurrent has introduced the world’s first ultra-thin, fast charging, 10 watt multimode wireless charging antenna assemblies (coil + ferrite). As the first of its series, the antenna targets ultra-thin, battery maximizing smartphones and other functionality rich connected devices. NuCurrent is delivering a full production version A4WP + Qi phone receiver antenna which provides nearly 80 percent efficiency at 10 watts with its Qi coil, combined with a 10 watt, fully uniform, orientation-free A4WP resonator on the same 0.3 millimeter printed substrate. From a systems perspective, this series of break-through antennas finally bridges the gap between all the standards in an environment hungry for space and power.The new, certifiable NC21-R76M13E-87670R30 enables fast charging with lower heat due to the use of NuCurrent patented technology, design expertise and proprietary modeling. Supporting standards from Wireless Power Consortium (Qi) and AirFuel™ Alliance (previously A4WP/PMA). New multi-mode antennas deliver the highest Q Factor, lowest heat at 0.3mm thinness for medium power applications. This product is available for immediate production or customization.NuCurrent will be demonstrating its leading, high-efficiency antennas at the upcoming Wireless Power Summit, to be held November 5-6 in San Diego, California. Schedule a meeting with NuCurrent at the event to learn how they can help custom-design, rapid-prototype and integrate the optimal antenna for your application.last_img read more

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IEEE Working Group to Develop Aerial Communications and Networking Standards

first_imgIEEE and the IEEE Standards Association (IEEE-SA), announced the formation of the IEEE Aerial Network Communications Working Group. Members of the new working group, working under the sponsorship of the IEEE Communications Society Standards Development Board (COM/SDB), will initially launch project IEEE P1920.1 to develop standards to enhance the situational awareness of aircraft and enable air-to-air communications in an ad hoc aerial network that includes manned, unmanned, civil and commercial aircraft.The growing utilization of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) is driving a need to ensure safety through increased situational awareness and direct air-to-air communications for all types of aircraft. Creating standards for Aerial Network Communications brings many benefits, such as safer and more coordinated use of UAVs in emergency or natural disaster situations, greatly enhanced tracking of commercial and civil aircraft, and overall safer operation with more advanced collision avoidance data being shared directly between all aircraft.Sponsored by the IEEE Communications Society, the IEEE Aerial Network Communications Working Group will hold their first formal meeting in September 2016 to open discussions on the IEEE P1920.1 project.last_img read more

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Raytheon Designs GaN-Based AESA LTAMDS Radar for U.S. Army

first_imgRaytheon has given the U.S. Army a look into the future of missile defense technology, with their vision for the next generation of air and missile defense radar. The information was supplied to the Army as part of their process to define the requirements for a future Lower Tier Air and Missile Defense Sensor (LTAMDS).Raytheon’s solution for the LTAMDS is based on the Gallium Nitride (GaN) powered Active Electronically Scanned Array (AESA) technology. Over the years Raytheon has spent over $200 million on researching this technology. At the AUSA Tradeshow in March 2016, Raytheon showed that they can quickly and affordably design, build, test and field a GaN-based AESA radar capable of defeating all threats.Their GaN-based AESA LTAMDS radar is designed to serve as a sensor on the Integrated Air and Missile Defense Battle Command System network. It will be fully interoperable with NATO, and also retain backwards compatibility with both the current Patriot system and any future system upgrades fielded by any of the 13-nations that currently own Patriot.”Others may draw on lesson learned from the terminated MEADS air and missile defense project or repeatedly re-baselined naval radars; Raytheon’s LTAMDS solution builds on successful programs such as the U.S. Navy’s Next Generation Jammer and the Air and Missile Defense Radar,” said Doug Burgess, director of Integrated Air and Missile defense AESA programs. “Our response, and our AESA GaN radar rollout at AUSA show there doesn’t need to be a wait of a decade or longer to get the sensor of the future. It will be available much, much sooner.”last_img read more

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